View Poll Results: Is it racist to prevent Africa from getting GM Foods?

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  • Yes, it's racist.

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Thread: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

  1. #11
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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by clownboy View Post
    Because you may be borrowing from Peter to pay [feed] Paul. Feeding a bunch of folks on something that may cause a spike in illness down the road just pushes problems down the road. Not to mention the dangers of monoculture. They could easily set themselves up for greater sufferring in a generation or two.

    They're doing the right thing asking for the info up front.
    I do not think the dangers of these foods (if they exist for certain crops) outweighs the danger of starvation that many nations in Africa currently face. I highly doubt that eating the foods is going to somehow cause an equal number of deaths to starvation.
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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    As an entertainer and performer, Penn Jillette is world-class.

    As a political analyst, he's hit-or-miss. His quasi-religious adherence to doctrinaire libertarianism (ironic given his atheism) makes him mostly Miss.
    I've moved on to a better forum (scienceforums.net). Facts matter, and I don't have the time or energy for putting up with the pretense that they don't. PM me if you'd like me to get in touch with you when I'm done developing my own forum system, likely towards the end of 2013.

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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Food for human consumption is ARTIFICIALLY scarce, not genuinely scarce.

    It is made artificially scarce by basing access to it upon purchasing power.

    THAT's the source of present starvation. Not crop yields, not tariffs or other national policies. Not organic vs. GMO.

    People starve today because profit is treated as more important than need, whether on the scale of individual consumers, countries, or whole industries.

    GM foods are not presumptively safe, nor are they presumptively unsafe. The hazards must be assessed on a case-by-case basis, using actual science (not ideology). The obvious catch is that there is a massive and incredibly powerful global commercial interest in pushing GM foods, based largely upon mass theft (i.e. patenting staple crops, charging subsistence farmers royalties on their own crops, and all manner of political maneuvering to FORCE GM foods upon populations that are neither informed nor consenting). This is not an issue of starvation versus survival, but of violence vs. autonomy.
    I've moved on to a better forum (scienceforums.net). Facts matter, and I don't have the time or energy for putting up with the pretense that they don't. PM me if you'd like me to get in touch with you when I'm done developing my own forum system, likely towards the end of 2013.

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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by cmakaioz View Post
    Food for human consumption is ARTIFICIALLY scarce, not genuinely scarce.

    It is made artificially scarce by basing access to it upon purchasing power.

    THAT's the source of present starvation. Not crop yields, not tariffs or other national policies. Not organic vs. GMO.

    People starve today because profit is treated as more important than need, whether on the scale of individual consumers, countries, or whole industries.
    People starve today, because of the same reasons people have starved throughout history, and because of corrupt politicians. Zimbabwe was once considered the breadbasket of Africa, until Mugabe started confiscating the property of white farmers, and now millions of his own people are starving, when they weren't before. It's not profit-driven so much as human depravity and corruption driven.
    "God is the name by which I designate all things which cross my path violently and recklessly, all things which alter my plans and intentions, and change the course of my life, for better or for worse."
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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by digsbe View Post
    Genetically modified food is perfectly fine. It usually is crossbred or seeds are given genes to help them survive in different climates or to grow faster. The sheer lack of information and ignorance at the word "genetic" is probably going to result in people starving to death.
    yep.

    and for those who are convinced GM food will kill them, there's nothing you can do to convince them that it won't.

    it's sad, too, because with predicted population growth, 70 percent of the new food is going to have to come from technology or from cutting waste, which also requires chemicals that some idiot blog like natural news will make false claims about.

    i run into the same thing with vaccines all of the time. i'm not against natural; i'll just point out that the natural human lifespan is 40, and it's perfectly natural to starve to death before reaching that age.

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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by Wake View Post

    What do you guys think? Is it racist to not have genetically-modified food shipped to Africa? How about the fact the WE tend to eat more modified food than natural, organic stuff?
    Frankly, I think it has nothing to do with racism, and everything to do with the need of Africans, and the supply on the end of those who donate. If I'm ****ing starving, and someone offers me food, I'm likely to take it. If I can afford to be choosy about whether or not my food is GM, then I'm really not that hungry.
    "God is the name by which I designate all things which cross my path violently and recklessly, all things which alter my plans and intentions, and change the course of my life, for better or for worse."
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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by digsbe View Post
    Genetically modified food is perfectly fine.
    No, it's not. Actually, it's pretty dangerous (unintended, long term consequences) and it's a manifestation of man's arrogance.

  8. #18
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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by cmakaioz View Post
    Food for human consumption is ARTIFICIALLY scarce, not genuinely scarce.

    It is made artificially scarce by basing access to it upon purchasing power.

    THAT's the source of present starvation. Not crop yields, not tariffs or other national policies. Not organic vs. GMO.

    People starve today because profit is treated as more important than need, whether on the scale of individual consumers, countries, or whole industries.

    GM foods are not presumptively safe, nor are they presumptively unsafe. The hazards must be assessed on a case-by-case basis, using actual science (not ideology). The obvious catch is that there is a massive and incredibly powerful global commercial interest in pushing GM foods, based largely upon mass theft (i.e. patenting staple crops, charging subsistence farmers royalties on their own crops, and all manner of political maneuvering to FORCE GM foods upon populations that are neither informed nor consenting). This is not an issue of starvation versus survival, but of violence vs. autonomy.
    When I read the OP my first thought was that Africa was not really rejecting GMO due to health concerns but due to fears of Neo-neocolonialism. I think they are right to fear it, Monsanto would set themselves up as the world tyrant of the food supply if they could. It's one of the aspects of advancing technology about which to be seriously concerned, the tendency of the developer of the technology to insist on absurd levels of exclusivity.
    The morality of abortion is not a religious belief, any more than the morality of slavery, apartheid, rape, larceny, murder or arson is a religious belief. These are norms of the natural law of mankind and can be legislated even in a completely religionless society.

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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzie View Post
    Frankly, I think it has nothing to do with racism, and everything to do with the need of Africans, and the supply on the end of those who donate. If I'm ****ing starving, and someone offers me food, I'm likely to take it. If I can afford to be choosy about whether or not my food is GM, then I'm really not that hungry.
    I agree it has nothing to do with racism. However, I'll give you a good example of how "charitable" giving sometimes leads to a greater problem. Nestle for decades gave away baby formula to mothers of newborns in poor areas of the world. Sounds good, right? However, the giveaway only extended to the first few months of the baby's life. Just long enough for the mother to stop lactating. Then, in order to feed their child they had to buy formula. The mothers would then buy the amount of formula they could afford, and have to water it down to make it last. The end result was a lot of sick and starving infants.

  10. #20
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    Re: Africa, Genetically-Modified Food, and Racism

    Most GMO food is TREATED AS IF SAFE for the same reasons the folks walking around unprotected in the first nuclear test zones treated it as safe...they had/have no sense of the effects, and were only beginning to consider them.

    We're past that original naivety already. Now we've moved on into the "Hey maybe we should test this out first?!?" (public) vs. "Nah F*** That Testing, It Will Interfere With Our Stolen Profits" (Big AgriBusiness) stage.

    Here's how we know that we DON'T know the long-term consequences of mass-scale industrial GMO agriculture:

    There hasn't yet BEEN a long-term time period for mass-scale industrial GMO agriculture.

    So the general question is:

    Do we adopt the usual approach to radically invasive technologies, which would be the Precautionary Principle?

    or

    Do we resign ourselves to profit supremacy, and piss all over the conscientious scientific approach (Precautionary Principle) for the sake of protecting private profit?

    The default response is the latter, because we live under profit supremacy.

    As usual, there is a massive conflict between what makes sense (health and sustainability-wise) vs. who (or more appropriately what is in charge).
    I've moved on to a better forum (scienceforums.net). Facts matter, and I don't have the time or energy for putting up with the pretense that they don't. PM me if you'd like me to get in touch with you when I'm done developing my own forum system, likely towards the end of 2013.

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