View Poll Results: What do you think about "planned obsolescence"?

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  • It's real

    17 70.83%
  • It's a myth

    0 0%
  • It's real but as an exception

    1 4.17%
  • Dunno

    3 12.50%
  • I don't care

    3 12.50%
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Thread: Planned obsolescence

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    Planned obsolescence

    Planned obsolescence, is it real or a myth?


    P.S. Before somebody tries to move this thread somewhere else, please keep in mind that planned obsolescence, if proved, is deeply troubling political issue.

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    ttwtt78640's Avatar
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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by Canell View Post
    Planned obsolescence, is it real or a myth?


    P.S. Before somebody tries to move this thread somewhere else, please keep in mind that planned obsolescence, if proved, is deeply troubling political issue.
    An example (or two) would make this post at least make some sense. ;-)
    “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists to adapt the world to himself.
    Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” ― George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    I'm not sure if it's real or not, but it certainly seems like it could be. I notice it with my cell phones. It seems like they start running a lot slower and having more problems when I get within a couple months of being able to get a new phone. But it could just be a matter of perception as well.
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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by ttwtt78640 View Post
    An example (or two) would make this post at least make some sense. ;-)
    Well, there are even films on the topic, like "Surplus. Therorozed into being consumers".

    Besides, I had to change my car's ignition cables today (there were sparks) and never stopped wondering: how in the world is it possible that something so basic has to be changed? I mean, it's a cable, come on! There is no electronics, no moving parts. Why didn't they make the insulation thicker so it endures? And then, why do I have to change all cables when there is only one sparking? Things like that. I'm quire unhappy with this story.
    Last edited by Canell; 07-02-12 at 01:31 PM.

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by molten_dragon View Post
    I'm not sure if it's real or not, but it certainly seems like it could be. I notice it with my cell phones. It seems like they start running a lot slower and having more problems when I get within a couple months of being able to get a new phone. But it could just be a matter of perception as well.
    That's a perfect example. Cellphones. Goes for computers, as well. Before new technology is released to the consumer, there's already "a better one" in the pipeline. Big screens the same thing. In fact, most technology products are designed and released for planned obsolescence. For that matter, so is clothing. I think I could go on and on . . .
    The devil whispered in my ear, "You cannot withstand the storm." I whispered back, "I am ​the storm."

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by Canell View Post
    Well, there are even films on the topic, like "Surplus. Therorozed into being consumers".

    Besides, I had to change my car's ignition cables today (there were sparks) and never stopped wondering: how in the world is it possible that something so basic has to be changed? I mean, it's a cable, come on! There is no electronics, no moving parts. Why didn't they make the insulation thicker so it endures? And then, why do I have to change all cables when there is only one sparking? Thing like that. I'm quire unhappy with this story.
    Ah, now we are getting somewhere. That is a good example, indeed. What you are seeing is "minimalism" or using the cheapest solution to the problem possible. Cars are made "cheaply" for a few valid reasons, one is to simply save weight, causing better fuel economy, another is to reduce production costs to help increase profit. As long as the auto part will survive the warranty period and pass minimal gov't safety standards it is likely to be used. The advantage of making cars that wear out soon after warranty is obvious, they will need replacement sooner. If you make a product that costs WAY more yet lasts longer, you make less profit per unit sold, sell fewer units and must wait a long, long time to sell your old customers a new one. ;-)
    Last edited by ttwtt78640; 07-02-12 at 01:35 PM.
    “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists to adapt the world to himself.
    Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” ― George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by ttwtt78640 View Post
    Cars are made "cheaply" for a few valid reasons, one is to simply save weight, causing better fuel economy, another is to save production cost to help increase profit.
    I don't think that adding 1 mm more insulation (worth $1-2) on the ignition cables would save that much energy or rubber. But it may have saved me the tens of dollars and the pollution of throwing the old cables out.

    Quote Originally Posted by ttwtt78640 View Post
    The advantage of making cars that wear out soon after warranty is obvious, they will need replacement sooner.
    Advantage for who? Certainly not me.

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by MaggieD View Post
    That's a perfect example. Cellphones. Goes for computers, as well. Before new technology is released to the consumer, there's already "a better one" in the pipeline. Big screens the same thing. In fact, most technology products are designed and released for planned obsolescence. For that matter, so is clothing. I think I could go on and on . . .
    Yep. Those that buy the latest electronic gizmo, also get soaked for all of the R&D costs, get to find the bugs first and have to wait for many apllications to "catch up". I find that my real needs are satisfied by using technology that has passed its prime a bit, yet still works just fine, so its costs are reduced to basically the production costs alone. That 46" 1080dpi HD TV that sold for $2K when it was "the new thing" only a few years ago now sells for $300, its true production cost, and is still compatable with MOST broadcast, cable, computer, CD and DVD/Blueray players. Just as you get a much better deal buying a 5 to 7 year old car, you get a better deal on "old tech" too, let the other guy pay the R&D costs, discover the "bugs", suffer the masive depreciation and get what you NEED later for about 1/3 (or less) of the cost. ;-)
    Last edited by ttwtt78640; 07-02-12 at 01:58 PM.
    “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists to adapt the world to himself.
    Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” ― George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by Canell View Post
    I don't think that adding 1 mm more insulation (worth $1-2) on the ignition cables would save that much energy or rubber. But it may have saved me the tens of dollars and the pollution of throwing the old cables out.



    Advantage for who? Certainly not me.
    The advantage is for the manufacturers and their retail outlets. If you intend to keep that vehicle going you will find and replace many, many parts - eventually you will have a good vehicle, but for 2x what a new one would have cost. That keeps the parts guys happy and profitable too. As you can see, it is not the comsumer that they care about. Making that ONE part last longer, at $2 per unit produced, is a lot of money, for very little gain (on their end); multiply that "tiny" cost increase by 1000 parts, on 100,000 units produced and you can then see the "problem" from their point of view. ;-)
    “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists to adapt the world to himself.
    Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” ― George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

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    Re: Planned obsolescence

    Quote Originally Posted by ttwtt78640 View Post
    The advantage is for the manufacturers and their retail outlets. If you intend to keep that vehicle going you will find and replace many, many parts - eventually you will have a good vehicle, but for 2x what a new one would have cost. That keeps the parts guys happy and profitable too. As you can see, it is not the comsumer that they care about. Making that ONE part last longer, at $2 per unit produced, is a lot of money, for very little gain (on their end); multiply that "tiny" cost increase by 1000 parts, on 100,000 units produced and you can then see the "problem" from their point of view. ;-)
    Yeah, the broken window fallacy. I don't like screwing up Nature for a fallacy.

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