View Poll Results: Should there be a death penalty?

Voters
138. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    65 47.10%
  • No

    53 38.41%
  • Under certain circumstances, please explain

    20 14.49%
Page 20 of 82 FirstFirst ... 1018192021223070 ... LastLast
Results 191 to 200 of 819

Thread: Death Penalty

  1. #191
    Sage
    Ikari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 01:05 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    54,124

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Fletch View Post
    I dont think we surrender our humanity by destroying evil.
    Depends on how we're defining evil here. Particularly when we have use of a prison system which provides the same amount of relative "safety" to society on whole as does the death penalty.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fletch View Post
    Saying, in effect, that if you intentionally take the life of an innocent you have forfeited your own, shows the value we place upon innocent human life. If a dog mauls a human, we put the dog down. There is less moral justification for that than putting down a murderous human.
    A dog isn't human and thus is not morally equivalent. And by using the death penalty, you KNOW that eventually you're going to consume innocent life. So you really aren't showing the value you place upon innocent human life because you are invoking a system which takes it.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

  2. #192
    Educator
    taxigirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Last Seen
    10-21-16 @ 06:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Socialist
    Posts
    1,205

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    1. Cameron Todd Willingham—In 1992, Willingham was convicted of arson murder in Texas. He was believed to have intentionally set a fire that killed his three kids. In 2004, he was put to death. Unfortunately, the Texas Forensic Science Commission later found that the evidence was misinterpreted, and they concluded that none of the evidence used against Willingham was valid. As it turns out, the fire really was accidental.

    2. Ruben Cantu—Cantu was 17 at the time the crime he was alleged of committing took place. Cantu was convicted of capital murder, and in 1993, the Texas teen was executed. About 12 years after his death, investigations show that Cantu likely didn’t commit the murder. The lone eyewitness recanted his testimony, and Cantu’s co-defendant later admitted he allowed his friend to be falsely accused. He says Cantu wasn’t even there the night of the murder.

    3. Larry Griffin—Griffin was put to death in 1995 for the 1981 murder of Quintin Moss, a Missouri drug dealer. Griffin always maintained his innocence, and now, evidence seems to indicate he was telling the truth. The first police officer on the scene now says the eyewitness account was false, even though the officer supported the claims during the trial. Another eyewitness who was wounded during the attack was never contacted during the trial, and he says Griffin wasn’t present at the crime scene that night.

    4. Carlos DeLuna—In 1989, DeLuna was executed for the stabbing of a Texas convenience store clerk. Almost 20 years later, Chicago Tribune uncovered evidence that shows DeLuna was likely innocent. The evidence showed that Carlos Hernandez, a man who even confessed to the murder many times, actually did the crime.

    5. David Wayne Spence—Spence was put to death in 1997 for the murder of three teenagers in Texas. He was supposedly hired by a convenience store clerk to kill someone else, but he allegedly killed the wrong people by mistake. The supervising police lieutenant said “I do not think David Spence committed this crime.” The lead homicide detective agreed, saying “My opinion is that David Spence was innocent. Nothing from the investigation ever led us to any evidence that he was involved.”

    6. Jesse Tafero—In 1976, Tafero was convicted of murdering a state trooper. He and Sonia Jacobs were both sentenced to death for the crime. The main evidence used to convict them was testimony by someone else who was involved in the crime, ex-convict Walter Rhodes. Rhodes gave this testimony in exchange for a life sentence. In 1990, Tafero was put to death. Two years later, his companion Jacobs was released due to a lack of evidence…the same evidence used to put Tafero to death.

    7 & 8. Thomas Griffin and Meeks Griffin— The oldest case on this list dates back to 1915. The Griffin brothers, two black men, were convicted of the murder of a white man. The reason they were convicted is because Monk Stevenson, another black man suspected of committing the murder, pointed to the brothers as having been responsible. He later admitted the reason he blamed them is because they were wealthy, and he assumed they had the money to beat the charges. The Griffin brothers were completely innocent, but they were put to death nonetheless.
    Ikari,

    These are all good cases that stand a chance of having their innocence proven (the Griffin brothers were pardoned after execution). That has not happened yet. One thing to think is why would the government, especially the prosecutor's office (which is most likely to do the investigating), admit that there has been a wrongful execution?

    "You know, when they came and took away my fourth amendment I kept my yap shut, what the hell, I really didnít have anything to hide anyway. When they grabbed up my second amendment I sat still and bit my tongue because, truth be told, Iím allergic to guns. But here we are, you with your cold hard fingers wrapped around the neck of my first amendment and Iíve got to shout as loud as I can, because if I donít, before you know it, you wonít let me say nothing at all"
    --Randolph J. Dworkin

    ďReading makes a full man, meditation a profound man, discourse a clear man.Ē
    -- Ben Franklin

    "It has been said that something as small as the flutter of a butterfly's wing can ultimately cause a typhoon halfway around the world"
    -- Chaos Theory

  3. #193
    Light△Bender

    grip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    ☚ ☛
    Last Seen
    12-13-17 @ 02:42 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    17,224
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Fletch View Post
    I dont think we surrender our humanity by destroying evil. Saying, in effect, that if you intentionally take the life of an innocent you have forfeited your own, shows the value we place upon innocent human life. If a dog mauls a human, we put the dog down. There is less moral justification for that than putting down a murderous human.
    If you kill even one innocent person was the justification for killing thousands of guilty worth it?
    Einstein, "science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind."

  4. #194
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Prague, Czech Rep.
    Last Seen
    10-10-12 @ 02:44 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    1,880

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    1. Cameron Todd Willingham—In 1992, Willingham was convicted of arson murder in Texas. He was believed to have intentionally set a fire that killed his three kids. In 2004, he was put to death. Unfortunately, the Texas Forensic Science Commission later found that the evidence was misinterpreted, and they concluded that none of the evidence used against Willingham was valid. As it turns out, the fire really was accidental.

    2. Ruben Cantu—Cantu was 17 at the time the crime he was alleged of committing took place. Cantu was convicted of capital murder, and in 1993, the Texas teen was executed. About 12 years after his death, investigations show that Cantu likely didn’t commit the murder. The lone eyewitness recanted his testimony, and Cantu’s co-defendant later admitted he allowed his friend to be falsely accused. He says Cantu wasn’t even there the night of the murder.

    3. Larry Griffin—Griffin was put to death in 1995 for the 1981 murder of Quintin Moss, a Missouri drug dealer. Griffin always maintained his innocence, and now, evidence seems to indicate he was telling the truth. The first police officer on the scene now says the eyewitness account was false, even though the officer supported the claims during the trial. Another eyewitness who was wounded during the attack was never contacted during the trial, and he says Griffin wasn’t present at the crime scene that night.

    4. Carlos DeLuna—In 1989, DeLuna was executed for the stabbing of a Texas convenience store clerk. Almost 20 years later, Chicago Tribune uncovered evidence that shows DeLuna was likely innocent. The evidence showed that Carlos Hernandez, a man who even confessed to the murder many times, actually did the crime.

    5. David Wayne Spence—Spence was put to death in 1997 for the murder of three teenagers in Texas. He was supposedly hired by a convenience store clerk to kill someone else, but he allegedly killed the wrong people by mistake. The supervising police lieutenant said “I do not think David Spence committed this crime.” The lead homicide detective agreed, saying “My opinion is that David Spence was innocent. Nothing from the investigation ever led us to any evidence that he was involved.”

    6. Jesse Tafero—In 1976, Tafero was convicted of murdering a state trooper. He and Sonia Jacobs were both sentenced to death for the crime. The main evidence used to convict them was testimony by someone else who was involved in the crime, ex-convict Walter Rhodes. Rhodes gave this testimony in exchange for a life sentence. In 1990, Tafero was put to death. Two years later, his companion Jacobs was released due to a lack of evidence…the same evidence used to put Tafero to death.

    7 & 8. Thomas Griffin and Meeks Griffin— The oldest case on this list dates back to 1915. The Griffin brothers, two black men, were convicted of the murder of a white man. The reason they were convicted is because Monk Stevenson, another black man suspected of committing the murder, pointed to the brothers as having been responsible. He later admitted the reason he blamed them is because they were wealthy, and he assumed they had the money to beat the charges. The Griffin brothers were completely innocent, but they were put to death nonetheless.
    Going back a century, I will concede that. The rest are cases championed by anit-dp activist who search for anyone who is to be executed where there might me some discrepancy in the trial, ignoring all other evidence. This in no way proves innocence. Once convicted, the presumed innocent doctrine obviously no longer applies. In fact it is telling of the weakness of the argument that Willingham is the poster boy of the anti-dp crowd. He would have easily been convicted even without the arson forensics. The are courts and objective people do not automatically accept the findings of dp activists.

  5. #195
    Sage
    Ikari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 01:05 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    54,124

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by taxigirl View Post
    Ikari,

    These are all good cases that stand a chance of having their innocence proven (the Griffin brothers were pardoned after execution). That has not happened yet. One thing to think is why would the government, especially the prosecutor's office (which is most likely to do the investigating), admit that there has been a wrongful execution?
    This list contains names of people who were found guilty of capital crimes and placed on death row who were later found to be wrongly convicted. Some people were exonerated posthumously.

    United States
    [edit] 1970-1979

    1973

    1. David Keaton Florida (Keaton v. State, 273 So.2d 385 (1973)). Convicted 1971.

    1974

    2. Samuel A. Poole North Carolina (State v. Poole, 203 S.E.2d 786 (N.C. 1974)). Convicted 1973.

    1975

    3. Wilbert Lee Florida (Pitts v. State 247 So.2d 53 (Fla. 1971), overturned and released by pardon in 1975). Convicted 1963.

    4. Freddie Pitts Florida (Pitts v. State 247 So.2d 53 (Fla. 1971), overturned and released by pardon in 1975). Convicted 1965.

    5. James Creamer Georgia (Emmett v. Ricketts, 397 F. Supp 1025 (N.D. Ga. 1975)). Convicted 1973.

    6. Christopher Spicer North Carolina (State v. Spicer, 204 SE 2d 641 (1974)). Convicted 1973.

    1976

    7. Thomas Gladish New Mexico. Convicted 1974.

    8. Richard Greer New Mexico. Convicted 1974.

    9. Ronald Keine New Mexico. Convicted 1974.

    10. Clarence Smith New Mexico. Convicted 1974.

    1977

    11. Delbert Tibbs Florida. Convicted 1974.

    1978

    12. Earl Charles Georgia. Convicted 1975.

    13. Jonathan Treadway Arizona. Convicted 1975.

    1979

    14. Gary Beeman Ohio. Convicted 1976.

    [edit] 1980-1989

    1980

    15. Jerry Banks.
    16. Larry Hicks.

    1981

    17. Charles Ray Giddens.
    18. Michael Linder.
    19. Johnny Ross.
    20. Ernest (Shuhaa) Graham.

    1982

    21. Annibal Jaramillo.
    22. Lawyer Johnson Massachusetts (Commonwealth v. Johnson, 429 N.E.2d 726 (1982)). Convicted 1971.

    1985

    23. Larry Fisher.

    1986

    24. Anthony Brown.
    25. Neil Ferber.
    26. Clifford Henry Bowen.

    1987

    27. Joseph Green Brown.
    28. Perry Cobb.
    29. Darby (Williams) Tillis.
    30. Vernon McManus.
    31. Anthony Ray Peek.
    32. Juan Ramos.
    33. Robert Wallace.

    1988

    34. Richard Neal Jones.
    35. Willie Brown.
    36. Larry Troy.

    1989

    37. Randall Dale Adams Texas (Ex Parte Adams, 768 S.W.2d 281) (Tex. Crim App. 1989). Convicted 1977.[3][4]
    38. Robert Cox.
    39. James Richardson.
    On April 8, 2010, former death row inmate Timothy B. Hennis, once exonerated in 1989, was reconvicted of a triple murder, thereby dropping him from the list of those exonerated. [1] Sentenced to death by military court-martial 15 April 2010

    [edit] 1990-1999

    1990

    40. Clarence Brandley Texas (Ex Parte Brandley, 781 S.W.2d 886 (Tex. Crim App. 1989). Convicted 1981.
    41. John C. Skelton.
    42. Dale Johnston.
    43. Jimmy Lee Mathers.

    1991

    44. Gary Nelson.
    45. Bradley P. Scott.
    46. Charles Smith.

    1992

    47. Jay C. Smith Pennsylvania. Convicted 1986.

    1993

    48. Kirk Bloodsworth Maryland. Convicted 1984. Exonerated 1993; first prisoner to be exonerated by DNA evidence. Serving life in prison when exonerated, as earlier death sentence was overturned.
    49. Federico M. Macias.
    50. Walter McMillan.
    51. Gregory R. Wilhoit Oklahoma. Convicted 1987. Along with Ron Williamson, Wilhoit later became the subject of John Grisham's 2006 non-fiction book The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town.[5]
    52. James Robison.
    53. Muneer Deeb.

    1994

    54. Andrew Golden.

    1995

    55. Adolph Munson.
    56. Robert Charles Cruz.
    57. Rolando Cruz.
    58. Alejandro HernŠndez.
    59. Sabrina Butler.

    1996

    60. Joseph Burrows. Joseph Burrows was released from death row after his attorney Kathleen Zellner persuaded the real killer to confess at the post-conviction hearing.
    61. Verneal Jimerson.
    62. Dennis Williams.
    63. Roberto Miranda.
    64. Gary Gauger
    65. Troy Lee Jones.
    66. Carl Lawson.
    67. David Wayne Grannis.

    1997

    68. Ricardo Aldape Guerra.
    69. Benjamin Harris.
    70. Robert Hayes.
    71. Christopher McCrimmon.
    72. Randall Padgett.
    It is later revealed, through additional research by Prof. Samuel Gross of the University of Michigan, that though James Bo Cochran was acquitted of murder, he did plead guilty to a robbery charge in an agreement made with prosecutors prior to his release. Therefore, Cochran is no longer on the list of those exonerated from death row. [2]

    1998

    73. Robert Lee Miller, Jr.
    74. Curtis Kyles.

    1999

    75. Shareef Cousin Louisiana (Louisiana v. Cousin, 710 So. 2d 1065 (1998)). Convicted 1996.
    76. Anthony Porter Illinois. Convicted 1983.
    77. Steven Smith.
    78. Ronald Williamson Oklahoma. Convicted 1988. Along with Gregory R. Wilhoit, Williamson later became the inspiration for and subject of John Grisham's 2006 non-fiction book The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town.[5]
    79. Ronald Jones.
    80. Clarence Dexter, Jr.
    81. Warren Douglas Manning.
    82. Alfred Rivera.

    [edit] 2000-2009

    2000

    83. Steve Manning.
    84. Eric Clemmons.
    85. Joseph Nahume Green.
    86. Earl Washington Virginia (pardoned). Convicted 1994 (1984, without life sentence).
    87. William Nieves.
    88. Frank Lee Smith (died prior to exoneration).
    89. Michael Graham.
    90. Albert Burrell.
    91. Oscar Lee Morris.

    2001

    92. Peter Limone.
    93. Gary Drinkard.
    94. Joachin Josť MartŪnez.
    95. Jeremy Sheets.
    96. Charles Fain.

    2002

    97. Juan Roberto Melendez-Colon Florida. Convicted 1984.
    98. Ray Krone Arizona (State v. Krone, 897 P.2d 621 (Ariz. 1995) (en banc)). Convicted 1992.
    99. Thomas Kimbell, Jr.
    100. Larry Osborne.

    2003

    101. Aaron Patterson.
    102. Madison Hobley.
    103. Leroy Orange.
    104. Stanley Howard.
    105. Rudolph Holton.
    106. Lemuel Prion.
    107. Wesley Quick.
    108. John Thompson.
    109. Timothy Howard Ohio. Convicted 1976.
    110. Gary Lamar James Ohio. Convicted 1976.
    111. Joseph Amrine.
    112. Nicholas Yarris Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania v. Yarris, No 690-OF1982, Court of Common Pleas, Delaware County, September 3, 2003. Order vacating conviction). Convicted 1982.

    2004

    113. Alan Gell.
    114. Gordon Steidl.
    115. Laurence Adams.
    116. Dan L. Bright.
    117. Ryan Matthews.
    118. Ernest Ray Willis.

    2005

    119. Derrick Jamison.
    120. Harold Wilson.

    2006

    121. John Ballard.

    2007

    122. Curtis McCarty.
    123. Michael McCormick.
    124. Jonathon Hoffman.

    2008

    125. Kennedy Brewer Mississippi. Convicted 1995.
    126. Glen Edward Chapman North Carolina. Convicted 1995.
    127. Levon "Bo" Jones[6] North Carolina. Convicted 1993.
    128. Michael Blair Texas.

    2009

    129. Nathson Fields Illinois. Convicted 1986.
    130. Paul House Tennessee. Convicted 1986.
    131. Daniel Wade Moore Alabama. Convicted 2002.
    132. Ronald Kitchen Illinois. Convicted 1988.
    133. Herman Lindsey Florida. Convicted 2006.
    134. Michael Toney Texas. Convicted 1999. (Toney later died in a car accident on October 3, 2009, just one month and a day after his exoneration.).[7]
    135. Yancy Douglas Oklahoma. Convicted 1997.
    136. Paris Powell Oklahoma. Convicted 1997.
    137. Robert Springsteen Texas. Convicted 2001.

    [edit] 2010-2019

    2010

    138. Joe D'Ambrosio Ohio. Convicted 1989. (While he was freed in 2010, but not yet exonerated, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal by the state of Ohio challenging the unconditional writ of habeas corpus and bar to D'Ambrosio's re-prosecution on January 23, 2012, nearly 2 years later, making D'Ambrosio the 140th death row exoneree since 1973. [3])
    139. Anthony Graves Texas. Convicted 1994.

    2011

    140. Gussie Vann Tennessee. Convicted 1994.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

  6. #196
    Sage
    Ikari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 01:05 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    54,124

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
    Going back a century, I will concede that. The rest are cases championed by anit-dp activist who search for anyone who is to be executed where there might me some discrepancy in the trial, ignoring all other evidence. This in no way proves innocence. Once convicted, the presumed innocent doctrine obviously no longer applies. In fact it is telling of the weakness of the argument that Willingham is the poster boy of the anti-dp crowd. He would have easily been convicted even without the arson forensics. The are courts and objective people do not automatically accept the findings of dp activists.
    So you're fine with discrepancies in trials so long as you get to execute the guy, eh? K. For me, it needs to be clean start to finish as that's the principles of our Republic. But whatever. The 2004 case wasn't any of that either, the fire was ruled an accident AFTER they killed a man for the crime.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

  7. #197
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Prague, Czech Rep.
    Last Seen
    10-10-12 @ 02:44 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    1,880

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    This list contains names of people who were found guilty of capital crimes and placed on death row who were later found to be wrongly convicted. Some people were exonerated posthumously.
    See, the system works. Btw, it is conventional to provide a link, assuming of course you did not compile the list yourself in the last 2 minutes.

  8. #198
    Finite and Precious
    Jredbaron96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    With you.
    Last Seen
    Today @ 10:29 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    7,882
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
    See, the system works.
    By that logic, we can plan a nuclear war everyday only to avert it at the last second.
    "Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough."
    -FDR

  9. #199
    Sage
    Ikari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 01:05 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    54,124

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
    See, the system works. Btw, it is conventional to provide a link, assuming of course you did not compile the list yourself in the last 2 minutes.
    Some were executed still, and look at all the names of the people on death row who were there for crimes they didn't commit. This is just a list of the ones we know about, the ones we're told about. It's likely greater than the list. This shows a disturbing trend in death penalty cases where it seems rather easy to be convicted of a capital crime without having committed the crime.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

  10. #200
    Educator
    taxigirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Last Seen
    10-21-16 @ 06:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Socialist
    Posts
    1,205

    Re: Death Penalty

    Quote Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
    Going back a century, I will concede that. The rest are cases championed by anit-dp activist who search for anyone who is to be executed where there might me some discrepancy in the trial, ignoring all other evidence. This in no way proves innocence. Once convicted, the presumed innocent doctrine obviously no longer applies. In fact it is telling of the weakness of the argument that Willingham is the poster boy of the anti-dp crowd. He would have easily been convicted even without the arson forensics. The are courts and objective people do not automatically accept the findings of dp activists.
    You asked for one and you got one.

    "Once convicted, the presumed innocent doctrine obviously no longer applies" Now it sounds like you believe we should not even be trying to exonerate others.

    "You know, when they came and took away my fourth amendment I kept my yap shut, what the hell, I really didnít have anything to hide anyway. When they grabbed up my second amendment I sat still and bit my tongue because, truth be told, Iím allergic to guns. But here we are, you with your cold hard fingers wrapped around the neck of my first amendment and Iíve got to shout as loud as I can, because if I donít, before you know it, you wonít let me say nothing at all"
    --Randolph J. Dworkin

    ďReading makes a full man, meditation a profound man, discourse a clear man.Ē
    -- Ben Franklin

    "It has been said that something as small as the flutter of a butterfly's wing can ultimately cause a typhoon halfway around the world"
    -- Chaos Theory

Page 20 of 82 FirstFirst ... 1018192021223070 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •