View Poll Results: Should a rape victim be able to take the morning after pill?

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  • Yes, it protects her from bearing the rapist's child

    106 92.98%
  • No, that pill is unethical

    8 7.02%
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Thread: Should a rape victim be able to take the morning after pill?

  1. #551
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    roguenuke's Avatar
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    Re: Should a rape victim be able to take the morning after pill?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    Sin must be absolved, one way or another.

    That article simply shows what is being said, the evidence is split. If it could be proved it cannot cause abortion, as defined as killing any zygote after conception, then I'd except its use in these circumstances. But the academic evidence is split right now.
    And, if in the afterlife, those taking Plan B are judged to have sinned, then they will face that punishment given to them from heaven. Since the Catholic church cannot prove though that something they consider a sin has occurred, then they cannot prove that the person did anything wrong or sinned at all. The person taking Plan B could be completely innocent of taking any life at all. Then they would have been punished for nothing more than petty speculation so the church could save face with their position.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I get to point out obvious aspects of the religion. If a Methodist says he prays to Mecca then I can point out he is confused somewhat about the basis of the Methodist branch of the Christian faith.

    At the heart of Catholic belief is also Papal Supremacy, the importance of the Magisterium of the Church and the Sacred Tradition. You do not get to dissent from doctrines like these.
    We're not talking about a major differentiation of beliefs here though, as with your Methodist/Mecca example. In fact, even that Methodist/Mecca example could show you wrong if the person were simply praying to God while in Mecca. Last I checked, the Christian God didn't ban Christians from praying in Mecca. And I'm pretty sure most people see Allah and God as one and the same, but the beliefs as different.

    Catholics can still disagree with the Pope. Only very devout Catholics agree with everything the Pope decrees and does. I wouldn't even say that every Catholic priest, bishop, or cardinal always agrees with the Pope, Papal Supremacy or not.
    "A woman is like a teabag, you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water." - Eleanor Roosevelt

    Keep your religion out of other people's marriages.

  2. #552
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    Wessexman's Avatar
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    Re: Should a rape victim be able to take the morning after pill?

    Quote Originally Posted by roguenuke View Post
    And, if in the afterlife, those taking Plan B are judged to have sinned, then they will face that punishment given to them from heaven. Since the Catholic church cannot prove though that something they consider a sin has occurred, then they cannot prove that the person did anything wrong or sinned at all. The person taking Plan B could be completely innocent of taking any life at all. Then they would have been punished for nothing more than petty speculation so the church could save face with their position.
    Actually this all depends on what the Church teaches. I believe it teaches that while the evidence is split on whether the morning after pill can cause abortion it is wrong to use it in any case. Indeed it makes no sense for any usual pro-lifer to accepts it use while this state o affairs remains.

    It is of course a sin to use it in almost any other context but rape, as it is a sin to use contraceptives in general.

    We're not talking about a major differentiation of beliefs here though, as with your Methodist/Mecca example. In fact, even that Methodist/Mecca example could show you wrong if the person were simply praying to God while in Mecca. Last I checked, the Christian God didn't ban Christians from praying in Mecca. And I'm pretty sure most people see Allah and God as one and the same, but the beliefs as different.

    Catholics can still disagree with the Pope. Only very devout Catholics agree with everything the Pope decrees and does. I wouldn't even say that every Catholic priest, bishop, or cardinal always agrees with the Pope, Papal Supremacy or not.
    You simply misunderstand the issue. These doctrines do not mean you have to agree with the Pope that is will rain tomorrow. But on issues of birth control and abortion, and such moral and doctrinal issues, you cannot dissent and certainly cannot ignore the Church's teaching. It simply makes no sense for you to hold yourself a Catholic and simply and blithely ignore Church doctrine on these issues.

    Authority and Dissent in the Catholic Church | Dr. William E. May | IgnatiusInsight.com

    'According to her own understanding of the term, the Church teaches that the magisterium is the authority to teach, in the name of Christ, the truths of Christian faith and life (morals) and all that is necessary and/or useful for the proclamation and defense of these truths (see Dei verbum, 8). This teaching authority is vested in the college of bishops under the headship of the chief bishop, the Roman Pontiff, the "concrete center of unity and head of the whole episcopate," [2] the successor of the Apostle Peter (see Vatican Council II, Lumen Gentium, 22; Vatican Council I, DS 3065-3074).

    This magisterium, moreover, demands assent to its teachings by the faithful in virtue of the divine authority vested in it and not simply in virtue of the contents of the message it teaches (Vatican Council I, DS 3020). It has authority in teaching all the faithful in keeping with the inner constitution of the Church itself (Lumen gentium, 23-24). Its teaching, moreover, is an exercise of its pastoral office, its munus (a term much richer in connotation than our English "office," connoting a privileged honor and mission [3]), to care for the "souls" of all the faithful, i.e., to safeguard the divine life within them....

    .....I have argued that the central core of Catholic moral teaching has been infallibly proposed by the ordinary magisterium. Even if one were to disagree with this argument (which I believe is sound), one must acknowledge that the magisterium does teach with a more than merely human authority on moral questions. Moreover, it proposes moral norms not as legalistic rules but as truths of Christian life. Moral teachings authoritatively but not infallibly proposed as true are binding upon the consciences of the faithful, including pope, bishops, theologians, and ordinary laypeople. All the faithful are to give these teachings a religious submission (obsequium religiosum) of will and mind. Teachings authoritatively proposed are proposed as true, not as opinions or "prudential guidelines."'
    Last edited by Wessexman; 01-06-12 at 07:14 PM.
    "It is written in the eternal constitution that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." - Edmund Burke

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