View Poll Results: Would it be ethical?

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  • Yes

    9 47.37%
  • No

    10 52.63%
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Thread: Would it be ethical?

  1. #31
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    First things first. I've long advocated studying sexual intercourse in space. We should send a male and a female astronaut up, have them have their fun, and monitor their vital signs and how their bodies react to sex in zero gravity.

    At some point we may be sending spacecraft on very long multi generational voyages which would require reproduction in space. That's why this kind of research is important.

  2. #32
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Quote Originally Posted by OhIsee.Then View Post
    I see what your angling for, you want the assistants job.
    With the problem I detailed, angles may be a major issue!

  3. #33
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    I would not find it ethically wrong if the woman is wilfully consenting to this process. I'm assuming that the woman would also be a scientist engaged in the research.

    Women trump embryos.

  4. #34
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Embryos need gravity to develop correctly. So, it would be unethical for humans to reproduce. If you want to argue that it doesn't matter if you don't plan to reproduce, just to see if the process (sex) works because you're terminating the pregnancy, then the same old arguments will arise that go along with abortion. There doesn't seem to be any problems with animals having sex in space, so I'm sure humans can figure it out just fine.

    Simulating gravity for development would be more ethical (just like any other thing you should do or not do for the health of your child).

    However, if humans only had the opportunity to reproduce in space - meaning, that's their only choice - then, it would be ethical and probably an imperative.

    I'd be curious as to how this question and discussion could be compared to places on the earth with severe hazards to offspring.
    The US is an odd ship. The captain yells out when he sees obtacles , but 535 individual propellers do the steering.

  5. #35
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Quote Originally Posted by GreenvilleGrows View Post
    Embryos need gravity to develop correctly. So, it would be unethical for humans to reproduce. If you want to argue that it doesn't matter if you don't plan to reproduce, just to see if the process (sex) works because you're terminating the pregnancy, then the same old arguments will arise that go along with abortion. There doesn't seem to be any problems with animals having sex in space, so I'm sure humans can figure it out just fine.

    Simulating gravity for development would be more ethical (just like any other thing you should do or not do for the health of your child).

    However, if humans only had the opportunity to reproduce in space - meaning, that's their only choice - then, it would be ethical and probably an imperative.

    I'd be curious as to how this question and discussion could be compared to places on the earth with severe hazards to offspring.
    I fail to see how this article supports what you say. While the clinostat mimics weightlessness it is not true weightlessness. In space there is no gravity. With the clinostat you have gravity pulling at ya from all directions. What a clinostat amounts to is a rubberband being pulled and pulled to near breaking point. The exact center of that rubber band may be "weightless" but it will still break due to being pulled apart at both ends.
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  6. #36
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    I see nothing unethical about sex in any environment.
    Ted Cruz is the dumbest person alive.

  7. #37
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Quote Originally Posted by coolwalker View Post
    Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    What's to be gained?

  8. #38
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Animal experiments have already occurred in zero G environments. With fish embryos there seemed to be no differences in the development. However in a rat, which is more related to us, the baby rats never developed the core musculature to be able to turn off their backs and onto their feet. You also would have the effects of gravity on bone growth and development missing. We already know what negative impacts there are on the fully developed human body when in a zero G environment for a period of time, I would assume that the effects would be felt even harder on a developing person. Another aspect of bone growth and strengthening is weight bearing. This doesn't matter in utero, but building bone density through daily activities through bearing weight through arms and legs is a part of the normal development model.

    Until we develop sufficient artificial gravity environments, long distance space travel and exploration/colonization is out of the question.
    "Loyalty only matters when there's a hundred reasons not to be-" Gen. Mattis

  9. #39
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kal'Stang View Post
    Why "obviously" defective? If you're thinking about radiation doing something there is no need to worry about that. Astronauts are shielded against radiation.

    And there is no need to dissect it. There are tons of tests that can be done without endangering its life and still get all the answers needed.
    He meant that either the child will have obvious defects (meaning you'll know them when you see them) or the child will have internal defects that would only be revealed through dissection -- and that unless you dissect the child, you'll never fully understand the risks of breeding in space.
    I'm already gearing up for Finger Vote 2014.

    Just for reference, means my post was a giant steaming pile of sarcasm.

  10. #40
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    Re: Would it be ethical?

    Experiments on reproduction in mice has already been conducted in zero-G on the International Space Station. From what I remember, the baby mice who were gestated in space, were brought back to Earth and experienced many developmental defects compared to their control subject "siblings" who were reared on the ground. Someone could Google it though, and get the specifics I'm sure.
    "Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence." - Dr. Carl Sagan

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