View Poll Results: Is the "Slippery Slope" a valid concept?

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Thread: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

  1. #41
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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    None of the above challenges the definitions I gave. If there was some hypocracy or willful/negligent misinterpretations that actually furthers my point.
    Sure it does, when did corporations become protected persons based on the amendment that freed slaves? Where do you come down on Citizens United and was that judicial activism or in the words of Roberts "calling balls and strikes". With the strike of a pen Russ Feingold was overturned. When exactly did Money=speech? Do you agree that's activism or is that just literal reading of the constitution?

    I don't even want to hear the WMD argument because it's a logical fallacy, so I will leave it alone.
    Not so, restrictions were made in the name of security to the Constitution. I think it's a pretty popular stance. So why can't a city outlaw the carrying of handguns on a person for security? When does it go from "proper wording" to "selective interpreation" using your words.

    Finally, if there are constitutional issues that need some governance there are ways to fix it using the logic of that which is necessary and proper.
    Once again necessary and proper...pretty subjective.
    “Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest good of everyone.” John Maynard Keynes

  2. #42
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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    Quote Originally Posted by iliveonramen View Post
    Sure it does, when did corporations become protected persons based on the amendment that freed slaves? Where do you come down on Citizens United and was that judicial activism or in the words of Roberts "calling balls and strikes". With the strike of a pen Russ Feingold was overturned. When exactly did Money=speech? Do you agree that's activism or is that just literal reading of the constitution?
    Corporations make decisions and contributions based on a consensus amongst the people who are incorporated into it. You upheld this as an example of judicial activism which it may or may not be but ultimately doesn't matter as I gave a definition independent of examples.



    Not so, restrictions were made in the name of security to the Constitution. I think it's a pretty popular stance. So why can't a city outlaw the carrying of handguns on a person for security? When does it go from "proper wording" to "selective interpreation" using your words.
    Now you are appealing to populism? I don't get what you can't understand about independence from the definition so I'm having trouble with this. First off, congress and the executive are supposed to make and approve laws respectively, the judicial is supposed to hear challenges from those laws. For laws to be proper that are not in the scope of the tenth amendment an amendment to the constitution must be passed. The handgun ban argument is an appeal to authority not found in the state's rights BTW, theres an amendment in the Bill of Rights barring prior restraint, therefore it is not within the federal, state, or local powers to do so.

    Once again necessary and proper...pretty subjective.
    No it isn't. Necessary is the opening argument, proper is whether or not it is allowable by the constitution OR that it's utilty is found outside the scope of a right which entails abuse of said right to infringe on the rights of others. There is no subjectiveness whatsoever as either a right has the scope of protection or it doesn't, personal opinions do not matter.
    Neither side in an argument can find the truth when both make an absolute claim on it.

    LMR

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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    So many things possess slippery slope effects. Tonight we had some small pieces of cake. All I should have had was one, but 3 are what I had. And the number of slippery slopes we slid down at a large corporation. Oh, so many slippery slopes. It may have something with being human.

  4. #44
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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    The validity of any theory involving people is based on the subject matter at hand and those involved. History shows it can be very real.

  5. #45
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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    Counciman, et al,

    Yes the question is about "validity" and NOT accuracy, truth, or expected outcomes. Historical evaluations and inductive reasoning are not a criteria (personal opinion).

    Quote Originally Posted by Councilman View Post
    The validity of any theory involving people is based on the subject matter at hand and those involved. History shows it can be very real.
    (COMMENT)


    The "Slippery Slope Concept" is deductively valid when the outcome logically follows from the premises. "Validity" has to do with the form (or format) being evaluated.

    • P1: All cats are dogs.
    • P2: Kermat the Frog is a cat.
    • THERFORE: Kermat the Frog is a dog.

    ----- OR -----
    • P1: .FALSE
    • P2: .FALSE
    • THEREFORE: FALSE


    Neither of the premises (P1 or P2) in this evaluation is TRUE; they are both unquestionably FALSE. The outcome is FALSE. But the premises are properly formed. The overall evaluation is properly shaped and formatted. However, IF the premises were both TRUE, then the conclusion would also have to be TRUE. Hence the position taken here (the formation of the decision process) is "valid;" even though we all know it is - in no way - the least bit "sound in its outcome." Validity has nothing to do with what the Premise stipulates or even whether the premises are TRUE.

    The "Slippery Slope" concept does not have to be foolproof to be valid. That is not what "to be valid means." As Condoleezza Rice once said, the process by which they made the decision to go to war was valid. What she implied (in absentia) was that the Premises (given as fact) were considered TRUE (later to be determined as FALSE). THUS: The position and outcome was FALSE; or NOT SOUND.

    The question of "Validity" is only half the question; the other half is "soundness." Each adoption or application of the "Slippery Slope" must be evaluated individually; against BOTH criteria (it must be both "sound" and "valid").

    Most Respectfully,
    R
    Last edited by RoccoR; 10-22-11 at 07:05 PM. Reason: Spelling

  6. #46
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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    Quote Originally Posted by RoccoR View Post
    Counciman, et al,

    Yes the question is about "validity" and NOT accuracy, truth, or expected outcomes. Historical evaluations and inductive reasoning are not a criteria (personal opinion).

    (COMMENT)


    The "Slippery Slope Concept" is deductively valid when the outcome logically follows from the premises. "Validity" has to do with the form (or format) being evaluated.

    • P1: All cats are dogs.
    • P2: Kermat the Frog is a cat.
    • THERFORE: Kermat the Frog is a dog.

    ----- OR -----
    • P1: .FALSE
    • P2: .FALSE
    • THEREFORE: FALSE


    Neither of the premises (P1 or P2) in this evaluation is TRUE; they are both unquestionably FALSE. The outcome is FALSE. But the premises are properly formed. The overall evaluation is properly shaped and formatted. However, IF the premises were both TRUE, then the conclusion would also have to be TRUE. Hence the position taken here (the formation of the decision process) is "valid;" even though we all know it is - in no way - the least bit "sound in its outcome." Validity has nothing to do with what the Premise stipulates or even whether the premises are TRUE.

    The "Slippery Slope" concept does not have to be foolproof to be valid. That is not what "to be valid means." As Condoleezza Rice once said, the process by which they made the decision to go to war was valid. What she implied (in absentia) was that the Premises (given as fact) were considered TRUE (later to be determined as FALSE). THUS: The position and outcome was FALSE; or NOT SOUND.

    The question of "Validity" is only half the question; the other half is "soundness." Each adoption or application of the "Slippery Slope" must be evaluated individually; against BOTH criteria (it must be both "sound" and "valid").

    Most Respectfully,
    R
    I agree wholeheartedly with this. It may or may not be valid that "baby steps" will lead to further outcomes however if the intent is for further restrictions down the road to use the example of regulations or laws then it is a sound theory that further steps will be taken. Very well stated.
    Neither side in an argument can find the truth when both make an absolute claim on it.

    LMR

  7. #47
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    Re: Is the "Slipper Slope Theory" a valid concept?

    "Slippery Slope," as far as escalating taxes and bloating bureaucracy goes, has long lost its validity as a descriptive concept. We have, for at least 50 years now, progressed way beyond the "slippery slope." Indeed, we have gone off the side of the mountain, fallen into into an icy fjord, were carried by currents out into the deep blue sea and drowned. We now lie at the bottom of the North Atlantic, not too far from the wreck of the Titanic.

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