View Poll Results: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

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    11 42.31%
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    15 57.69%
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Thread: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

  1. #91
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by LesGovt View Post
    I may have erred, but I set up a new thread under Philosophical Discussion under Non-Political Forums.
    To err is human!
    A screaming comes across the sky.
    It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now.
    Pynchon - Gravity's Rainbow

  2. #92
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker View Post
    To err is human!
    So true, but to forgive is divine.

  3. #93
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by LesGovt View Post
    So true, but to forgive is divine.
    But never pay full price for late pizza.
    Liberté. Égalité. Fraternité.

  4. #94
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by MusicAdventurer View Post
    Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct and an accurate reflection of good ethics or is it a good piece of work that constantly needs to be altered? Is it good practice to sight part(s) of the constitution and its amendments as solid evidence for one's argument on an ethical position?
    The Constitutional amendments are pretty important, that's why any intention of changing them, must be done through a complicated process.
    Any argument to the contrary is clearly ridiculous.

    The traditional "living document" theory is bunk and would require us not to read the rules, in order for it to be true.
    I was discovering that life just simply isn't fair and bask in the unsung glory of knowing that each obstacle overcome along the way only adds to the satisfaction in the end. Nothing great, after all, was ever accomplished by anyone sulking in his or her misery.
    —Adam Shepard

  5. #95
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by LesGovt View Post
    We got change in 2008 and look what that has wrought. Please no more change for a century or two.
    Umm .. when did we make needed changes to the founding documents that help arrange our governmental system in 2008 ... must have missed that one .. holy crap .. fill me in please, please please

  6. #96
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by deltabtry View Post
    I am a conservative and the meaning of it in my terns is, that I live and breath the constitution as it was written. I believe the men of that day our founding father's drafted the constitution with no hidden agenda in mind. The constitution a document that isn't perfect yet our founding father's allowed a avenue for change if need be. I am also a Libertarian which I also categorize as conservative, we live in a republic which in my mind allows us to live as we see fit, so long as it doesn't hurt the very society we live in. I can go on but, I hope this short explanation will do.
    No wonder why conservatives get all squeamish when we talk about the founding documents as "living documents" or entertain the possibility (and likelihood) that said documents need updating.. from the above statement "I live and breath the constitution as it was written" ... this "conservative" really does see the founding documents as sacrosanct ... you guys realize no document is perfect nor is any man right? No system is perfect .. thinking anything else seems naive to most intellectuals who have risen above the years of brainwashing.

    I am sure (and as your beloved constitution implies) that our founding fathers (whom you hold so dear) would have scolded you for thinking that things should not be bettered.

    I might also mention that our founding fathers were a little arrogant and selfish in that they were a select group of people who had money, slaves, land, and so on. They drafted the constitution in a manner that would protect their interests, i.e. at least their immediate future all the way to their great grand kids and beyond. I don't think they knew that the mechanisms they included for change (which they purposely made so that it would be nearly impossible to make any significant changes) would last as long as they did and prove to be as big a problem as it has.

    These guys saw things only from the perspective of "what can we make so that our country will stay financially strong for many many years .... as they were rich themselves, they rally had no concept or interest in including mechanisms for upward class movement .. if anything they may have thought the idea of upward class movement was a "neat" concept .. however, they really had no idea how it could actually happen in a manner that was reflective of equal opportunity. Our founding fathers knew what they didn't want, but were not able to fully dream of what could be.

  7. #97
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post
    Times change, and so should our Constitution. I find that Founding Fatherism is one of the sillier religions in our society; the dudes who wrote the Constitution were just some politicians. They had some good ideas, some awful ideas, and some ideas that may have been good at the time but simply didn't survive the test of time. It's strange that people can argue that their values were what made this country great, while at the same time lamenting that we don't follow their values.
    Utter nonsense, the Constitution has been amended to reflect modern times. The original intent of each active clause IS sacrosanct legally, and should never be circumvented.
    "He who does not think himself worth saving from poverty and ignorance by his own efforts, will hardly be thought worth the efforts of anybody else." -- Frederick Douglass, Self-Made Men (1872)
    "Fly-over" country voted, and The Donald is now POTUS.

  8. #98
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker View Post
    To err is human!
    My point exactly regarding our founding documents. This is why our founding fathers included a way to change things. However, they were overly protective and thus arrogant (thinking they would be the best thinkers for centuries to come) when they created shenanigans in order to negate the mechanisms for change that they built in. This is essentially a way of trying to look wise and humble i.e. "look, I created ways for it to be changed, I am acknowledging my imperfection" while at the same time saying "look, I did create a way for change, but I am so confident that I am perfect that I will make it next to impossible for change to occur" ... arrogance.

  9. #99
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Guerrilla View Post
    The Constitutional amendments are pretty important,
    Could not agree more

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Guerrilla View Post
    that's why any intention of changing them, must be done through a complicated process.
    while I agree that changing them should not be as easy as say the president signing a petition ... I do think the current process is outdated

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Guerrilla View Post
    Any argument to the contrary is clearly ridiculous.
    you are entitled to your opinion

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Guerrilla View Post
    The traditional "living document" theory is bunk and would require us not to read the rules, in order for it to be true.
    Please explain what you think the traditional "living document" theory is .. I am curious to see just how radical (ooo scary word) conservatives see such a "theory"

  10. #100
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    Re: Are the U.S. constitution and its amendments sacrosanct? Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post
    Times change, and so should our Constitution.
    Agree.
    Article V has a procedure for this.

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