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Thread: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

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    Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Because I don't think it is. We already have too many stoners getting away with it and all of them are seriously tarnishing our society. All legalizing would do is make more people use it and rates of lung cancer and pot-related accidents would skyrocket. No wonder only stoners support legalization.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbassline View Post
    All legalizing would do is make more people use it
    Someday, hopefully, people will stop believing in that myth.

    Decriminalization is said to increase availability, encourage use, and provide disincentives to quit. Thus, we expected longer careers and fewer quitters in Amsterdam, but our findings did not support these expectations. (snip) With the exception of higher drug use in San Francisco, we found
    strong similarities across both cities. We found no evidence to support claims that criminalization reduces use or that decriminalization increases use.

    http://www.mapinc.org/lib/limited.pdf

    (American Journal of Public Health)
    In sum, there is little evidence that decriminalization of marijuana use necessarily leads to a substantial increase in marijuana use."

    Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base

    (National Academy of Sciences - Institute of Medicine)
    Generally, decriminalization is not found to significantly impact drug use. An implication is that the demand for drugs is highly inelastic with respect to incremental changes in the legal sanctions for possession of small amounts of marijuana.

    There is no strong evidence that decriminalization effects either the choice or frequency of use of drugs, either legal (alcohol) or illegal (marijuana and cocaine).

    http://www.icjia.state.il.us/GoTo204...%20ALCOHOL.doc

    (Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority)
    The available evidence indicates that the "decriminalization" of marijuana possession had little or no impact on rates of use. Although rates of marijuana use increased in those U.S. states which reduced maximum penalties for possession to a fine, the prevalence of use increased at similar or higher rates in those states which retained more severe penalties. There were also no discernable impacts on the health care systems. On the other hand, the so-called "decriminalization" measures did result in substantial savings in the criminal justice system.

    The impact of marijuana decriminalization: an upda...[J Public Health Policy. 1989] - PubMed Result

    (National Center for Biotechnology Information)
    The preponderance of the evidence gathered and examined for this study points to the conclusion that decriminalization had virtually no effect either on the marijuana use or on related attitudes and beliefs about marijuana use among American young people in this age group. The degree of disapproval young people hold for marijuana use, the extent to which they believe such use is harmful, and the degree to which they perceive the drug to be available to them were also unaffected by the law change.

    NCJRS Abstract - National Criminal Justice Reference Service

    (National Criminal Justice Reference Service)
    Several lines of evidence on the deterrent effects of marijuana laws [3], and on decriminalization experiences in the United States, the Netherlands, and Australia suggest that eliminating (or significantly reducing) criminal penalties for first-time possession of small quantities of marijuana has either no effect or a very small effect on the prevalence of marijuana use.

    Major publications from the RAND Drug Policy Research Center's

    (University of California, Berkely)
    The available evidence indicates that depenalisation of the possession of small quantities of cannabis does not increase cannabis prevalence. The Dutch experience suggests that commercial promotion and sales may significantly increase cannabis prevalence.

    Evaluating alternative cannabis regimes (and follow-up comments)

    (The British Journal of Psychiatry)
    Fear of apprehension, fear of being imprisoned, the cost of cannabis or the difficulty in obtaining cannabis do not appear to exert a strong influence on decisions about cannabis consumption, at least amongst the vast majority of 18-29 year olds. Those factors may limit cannabis use among frequent cannabis users but there is no evidence, as yet, to support this conjecture.

    Lawlink NSW: B58 - Does prohibition deter cannabis use?

    (Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research, Germany)
    The available data indicate that these decriminalisation measures had little or no impact on rates of use.

    http://dassa.sa.gov.au/webdata/resou...MONOGRAPH6.pdf

    (Drug and Alcohol Services Council, South Australia)
    There is no evidence to date that the CEN system in South Australia has increased levels of regular cannabis use, or rates of experimentation among young adults.

    http://www.aodgp.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/332B63EE0E0E0C39CA25703700041DAC/$File/mono37.pdf

    (National Drug Strategy Household Surveys, South Austrailia)
    In Australia the evidence is accumulating -- from public attitude surveys coming down on the side of liberalising cannabis laws, from criminal justice system data indicating a vast, expensive and relatively punitive net being cast over youthful cannabis users, and from evidence that liberalisation does not increase cannabis use -- that the total prohibition approach is costly, ineffective as a general deterrent, and does not fit with the National Drug Strategy's goal of harm minimisation.

    Australian Institute of Criminology - Error

    (Austrailian Institute of Criminology)
    Clearly, by itself, a punitive policy towards possession and use accounts for limited variation in nation level rates of illegal drug use.

    http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/...l.pmed.0050141

    (Public Library of Science, World Health Organization)

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbassline View Post
    Because I don't think it is. We already have too many stoners getting away with it and all of them are seriously tarnishing our society. All legalizing would do is make more people use it and rates of lung cancer and pot-related accidents would skyrocket. No wonder only stoners support legalization.
    You have all opinion, without a single grounded premise.

    Accidents are caused by people not paying attention. Should legislation be created that prosecutes people for not constantly focusing, because it has been shown to cause accidents?

    How do you enforce it? Cannabis is a victimless crime, and the enforcement of such a law has unintended consequences that far outweigh the benefits. From an opportunity cost standpoint, busting cannabis users and sellers costs the time needed to do so, when there are many serious crimes being committed daily.
    It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.
    "Wealth of Nations," Book V, Chapter II, Part II, Article I, pg.911

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goldenboy219 View Post
    You have all opinion, without a single grounded premise.

    Accidents are caused by people not paying attention. Should legislation be created that prosecutes people for not constantly focusing, because it has been shown to cause accidents?

    How do you enforce it? Cannabis is a victimless crime, and the enforcement of such a law has unintended consequences that far outweigh the benefits. From an opportunity cost standpoint, busting cannabis users and sellers costs the time needed to do so, when there are many serious crimes being committed daily.
    Yet more typical pro-weed garbage from a pot smoker.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbassline View Post
    Yet more typical pro-weed garbage from a pot smoker.
    You can start debating any time now.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbassline View Post
    Yet more typical pro-weed garbage from a pot smoker.
    Could you please post some material to support your position? Other than your opinion.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Could you try to post some information about weed that will convince me to support legalization?

    Oh, that's right, you can't because all of it is a bunch of lies to make law-abiding non-smokers look bad.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    I do NOT smoke weed, I do not want to smoke weed (or anything, including cigs- gross!), I have not ever smoked weed (spare trying it a few times, years ago), and no one in my family smokes weed.

    I still believe it should be legalized, largely due to the reasons Goldenboy stated.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbassline View Post
    Could you try to post some information about weed that will convince me to support legalization?

    Oh, that's right, you can't because all of it is a bunch of lies to make law-abiding non-smokers look bad.
    You have already been debunked by binary digit.

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    Re: Is legalizing marijuana good for society?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbassline View Post
    Yet more typical pro-weed garbage from a pot smoker.
    Compared to the the ignorance spewed from the anti-weed crowd, my garbage is worth its weight in premium cannabis (which is sold for as much as $2000/oz). Or platinum, although that is selling my garbage short.

    You did not come here to debate you came her to express your anger; probably because a close friend or relative smokes weed, and it just infuriates you. Come back when you have to proper ammunition to debate the externalities of cannabis legislation.
    It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.
    "Wealth of Nations," Book V, Chapter II, Part II, Article I, pg.911

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