Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 114

Thread: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

  1. #21
    As you are, I was.
    Grand Mal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    on an island off the left coast of Canada
    Last Seen
    Today @ 10:07 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    13,554
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandokan View Post
    Very good article by Fabiola Santiago about the three Cuban bloggers traveling around the world and their international impact. The Castroit regime made a big mistake allowing these bloggers to travel abroad and they are paying a big price for it. The regime is discredited now more than ever.
    Viva La Revolucion!
    The eye through which you see God is the same eye through which God sees you.
    -Jalal al-din Rumi-

  2. #22
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Yoani Sánchez at the Federal Foreign Office
    Auswärtiges Amt - Federal Foreign Office - Yoani Sánchez at the Federal Foreign Office

    Federal Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle met with Cuban blogger Yoani Sánchez in Berlin on 7 May. Her
    blog “Generación Y” describing daily life in her home country has made Sánchez a well know figure.

    http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/cae/s...BM-Sanchez.jpg
    Sánchez at the Federal Foreign Office
    © AA 130507-BM-Sanchez.jpg

    The blog is often attacked by hackers. Sánchez has repeatedly been publicly vilified and even arrested. In 2008, she received the Ortega y Gasset journalism award given by the Spanish newspaper El Pais. For years she had been prevented from traveling abroad, but a change in Cuba’s travel laws in 2013 brought relief.

    Since then she has visited eight countries. In Berlin, she is currently taking part in the re:publica conference, which deals with new trends in digital society. It is an ideal stage for Yoani Sánchez to speak openly and freely with other international internet activists and to spend time networking with them.

    She is also taking time to get to know Berlin. On her twitter account @yoanisanchez she has described her visit to the Jewish Museum and many of the city’s galleries.
    Yoani participated in the conference at the Institute Cervantes in Berlin on May 5 about new trends in digital technologies, where she talked about her experiences.

  3. #23
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    3D Finally Comes to Cuba
    Yoani Sanchez: 3D Finally Comes to Cuba

    Yoani Sanchez
    Posted: 04/09/2013 4:54 pm


    http://translatingcuba.com/wp-conten...84042769_n.jpg
    Poster for the Young Filmmakers Festival in Havana

    They stretch out their hands to touch the creature that seems to emerge from the screen. They scream when the dragon opens its mouth and even cringe when the trees of the ancient magic forest surround them. They are the first viewers of 3D movies in Cuba, the first travelers on an optical adventure. Teenagers, for the most part, who want to appreciate the sensation of three dimensions in the movies. They put on their special glasses and when the film ends, they always want to see it again, to re-experience those visual effects.

    In my neighborhood they've opened a 3D theater. A tiny place run by a family where you can watch the latest movies with this technology that have been released to the world movie market. At first, no one knew precisely what it was all about, but little by little the enthusiasm has been spreading among younger people and now there is a line outside the place to get a seat in front of that fantastic screen. This week they are showing The Hobbit, a lavish production based on the work of the novelist and philologist J. R. R. Tolkien.

    The State hasn't wanted to be left behind and during the Young Filmmakers Festival in Havana they programmed, for the first time, a series of film showings in 3D. The projections took place in a room accommodating only 45 viewers and the tickets sold out in advance. The glasses and TVs that allow you to enjoy this technology have never been sold in Cuban stores, but the wide variety of these gadgets that show up in the underground market is surprising. On the illegal networks you can find everything you need to enjoy this new entertainment. No one wants to miss the experience, even though it only lasts a few minutes.
    In the 1950s La Habana was the second city in the world to install in the Radiocentro’s theatre the 3D system and multiple screens with stereophonic sound. The movie Bwana Devil was the first 3D movie projected in that theatre.

  4. #24
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Cuba's National Assembly to Return to Capitol After 54 Years
    Yoani Sanchez: Cuba's National Assembly to Return to Capitol After 54 Years

    Yoani Sanchez
    Posted: 04/30/2013


    Photo: Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo

    The Capitol building in Havana is beginning to emerge from its long punishment. Like a penitent child, it has waited 54 years to return to its status as the site of the Cuban parliament. Visited by everyone, it was a natural sciences museum with stuffed animals -- plagued with moths -- and in one of its hallways the first public internet site in the Cuban capital opened. While the tourists photographed the enormous statue of the Republic, thousands of bats hung from its highest decorated ceilings. They slept upside down during the day, but at night they swooped around leaving their feces on the walls and cornices. It accumulated there for decades, amid the indifference of the employees and the giggles of teenagers who pointed at the waste saying, "Look, ****, ****." This is the building I have known since my childhood, fallen into disgrace but still impressive.

    Visitors are always captivated by the history of the diamond that marks the starting point of the Central Highway, with its share of cursing and greed. And on observing this neoclassical colossus, these same travelers confirm -- what we all know but no one says out loud -- "It looks a lot like the Capitol in Washington." In this similarity lies part of the reason of the political exile suffered by our flagship building. It is too reminiscent of that other one; an obvious first cousin of what has come to pass for the image of the enemy. But since, by decree, no architectural symbols are erected in any city, its dome continues to define the face of Havana, along with the Malecón and el Morro which stand at the entrance to the Bay. For those arriving from the provinces, the photo in front of the wide staircase of this grand palace is obligatory. Its dome is also the most common reference point in paintings, photos, crafts, and whatever trinket someone wants to take back home to say: I was in Havana. While they insisted on downplaying its importance, it only became more prominent. The greater the stigma attached to it, the more enthralling its mixture of beauty and decay. Among other reasons because in the decades after its construction -- right up to today -- no other construction on the Island has managed to surpass it in splendor.

    Now, the National Assembly of People's Power will begin to sit exactly where the Congress of the Republic of Cuba once met, a congress the official history books speak so badly of. I imagine our parliamentarians meeting in the chamber of upholstered seats, surrounded by the large windows with their regal bearing, under the finely decorated ceilings. I see them, as well, raising every hand to unanimously -- or by huge majorities -- approve every law. Silent, tame, uniform in their political ideas, eager not to offend the real power. And I don't know what to think; whether, in reality, this is a new humiliation -- a more elaborate punishment -- in store for the Havana Capitol; or if, on the contrary, it is a victory, the triumphant caress it has been waiting for more than half a century.
    The National Capitol Building in Havana, the Palace of the Laws, has an externally superficially resemblance to the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C. Its Cupola resembles the one at the Pantheon in Paris. At the time of its construction the cupola at 92 m (302 feet) high was the third highest in the world. The Statue of the Republic located in the main hall of the long steps under the cupola, at 49 feet high is the third larger statue indoors in the world. It is covered with 22 carat (92%) gold leaf and weighs 49 tons. This hall leads to the two chambers that used to house the Senate and Chamber of Representatives. The 1940 constitution was discussed and approved on those chambers. It will be reinstalled in the same chambers, in a near future, by a Congress chosen in free election by the Cuban people.


    On the left the Hall of Lost Steps, centre Capitol cupola, right Statue of the Republic

    The Capitol site cover an area of 43,600 m2. Of those the building has a footprint of 13,500 m2, the walkways 3,500 m2 and the gardens have a surface area of 26,600 m2. The building measures are 100 m long (328 feet) by 70 m wide (230 feet). The Capitol building is a great architectural and structural engineering achievement.

  5. #25
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Yoani Sánchez at the Federal Foreign Office
    Auswärtiges Amt - Federal Foreign Office - Yoani Sánchez at the Federal Foreign Office

    Federal Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle met with Cuban blogger Yoani Sánchez in Berlin on 7 May. Her blog “Generación Y” describing daily life in her home country has made Sánchez a well know figure.

    130507-BM-Sanchez.jpg
    Sánchez at the Federal Foreign Office © AA

    The blog is often attacked by hackers. Sánchez has repeatedly been publicly vilified and even arrested. In 2008, she received the Ortega y Gasset journalism award given by the Spanish newspaper El Pais. For years she had been prevented from traveling abroad, but a change in Cuba’s travel laws in 2013 brought relief.

    Since then she has visited eight countries. In Berlin, she is currently taking part in the re:publica conference, which deals with new trends in digital society. It is an ideal stage for Yoani Sánchez to speak openly and freely with other international internet activists and to spend time networking with them.

    She is also taking time to get to know Berlin. On her twitter account @yoanisanchez she has described her visit to the Jewish Museum and many of the city’s galleries.
    Yoani participated in the conference at the Institute Cervantes in Berlin on May 5 about new trends in digital technologies, where she talked about her experiences.

  6. #26
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    From the Jewish Museum to the Stasi Museum and From Berlin Straight to Havana
    Yoani Sanchez: From the Jewish Museum to the Stasi Museum and From Berlin Straight to Havana

    Yoani Sanchez
    Posted 05/10/2013

    1368198200_museo_judio-300x300.jpg
    The Jewish Museum in Berlin. Photo: Yoani Sanchez

    The building is shaped like a dislocated Star of David. Gray, with a zinc-clad facade and little openings that provoke a strong sense of claustrophobia. The museum is not only the objects on its walls and in its display cases, the museum is all of it, each space one can move through and even the voids -- with no human presence -- that can be glimpsed through certain gaps. There are family photos, books with their gold-embossed covers, medical instruments, and images of young people in their bathing suits. It is life, the life of German Jews before the Holocaust. One might expect to see only the testimonies of the horrors, but most dramatic is finding yourself facing the testimony of everyday life. Laughter captured -- years before the tragedy -- is as painful to look at as are the emaciated corpses and piled up cadavers. The proof of those moments of happiness make the tears and pain that follow more terrifying.

    After a time between the narrow corridors of the place and amid its bewildering architecture, I go outside and breathe. I see spring greenery in Berlin and think: we can't allow this past to ever return.

    And not very far from there, stands the Stasi Museum. I enter their cells, the interrogation rooms. I come from the perspective of a Cuban who was detained in the same place, where a window looking outward becomes an unattainable dream. One cell was lined with rubber, the scratch marks of the prisoners can still be seen on its walls. But more sinister seeming to me are the offices where they ripped -- or fabricated -- a confession from the detainees. I know them, I've seen them. They are a copy of their counterpart in Cuba, copied to a T by the diligent students from the Island's Ministry of the Interior who were taught by GDR State Security. Impersonal, with a chair the prisoner can't move because it is anchored to the floor and some supposed curtain behind which the microphone or video camera are hidden. And the constant metallic noises from the rattling of the locks and bars, to remind the prisoners where they are, how much they are at the mercy of their jailer.

    After this I again need air, to get out from within those walls. I turn away from that place with the conviction that what, for them, is a museum of the past, is what we are still living in the present. A "now" that we cannot allow to prolong itself into tomorrow.

    1368198200_ventana_celda_stasi-225x300.jpg
    A tiny window, the only source of light in a German Stasi cell. Photo: Yoani Sanchez
    Hundreds of East German government documents on Stasi relations with Cuba's own feared Ministry of the Interior, known as MININT, has been found in the Stasi archives.

    The MININT is ''almost a carbon copy'' of the repressive Stasi security system, exported by East Germany to Cuba in the 1970s and '80s, and the ties between the two organizations run far deeper than previously known.

  7. #27
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    The Stasi taught the Cubans how to bug tourist hotel rooms, how to mount effective camera and wiretap systems for eavesdropping, delivered one-way mirrors used for interrogations and provided equipment to fabricate masks, mustaches and other forms of makeup, provided computers and introduced new archiving methods that better organized, protected and sped up the Cubans' processing of security information.

  8. #28
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    U.S. experts on Cuban security agencies agree with the Stasi role in Cuba: “East Germany had a major role in building up Cuban counterintelligence as well as its foreign intelligence services, providing training for decades . . . right up to the final days of East Germany,” said Chris Simmon, a career U.S. counterintelligence officer and expert on Cuban intelligence.

    “'The repressive system that existed in East Germany . . . is the same one that exists today in Cuba,” he says. “What MININT learned from the Stasi has not been forgotten.”

  9. #29
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    When a security system has its own prisons, judges, lawyers and interrogators and no one controls them, as in the Castroit regime, then the state security is what's sustaining the Communist Party, and repression is what's sustaining the Castroit regime.

  10. #30
    Guru

    Sandokan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Los Angels, USA
    Last Seen
    05-24-17 @ 02:51 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    2,617

    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Jorge Luis Garcia Vázquez author of the blog STASI-MININT, is a Cuban exile living in Berlin. In his blog he provides lots of information about the relationship between the STASI & the MINIT. In his article “El Archivo del MININT y el asesoramiento de la STASI.” (The MININT Archive and the advise of the STASI), he provide the followings statistics (translation):

    Until 1980 the MININT had prepared a total of:

    2,088,571 records or documents of the State Security
    6,056,847 records pertaining to Internal Order


    This total quantity of documents: 8,145,418, was the main problem of the Minint, their classification, organization and conservation, especially of 160,000 pre-1959 records....

    The Stasi report describes the exact location of the Archive, the status of the personal Card Index, which contains “all the Counterintelligence materials, for example the data on informants, operations carried out or documents of operational importance.”

    In this card index alone were registered 4 million people with the following personal data: surname, first name, date of birth, gender, skin color, codified fingerprints and registration number....

    The officers of the Stasi, who have came to have 180 kilometers of records and documents on their citizens, delivered gladly to their allies and students in political repression their experiences and technical resources, to monitor and liquidate any opposition or dissent.
    Here you can read the whole document in Spanish: Stasi-Minint Connection

Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •