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Thread: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

  1. #41
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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiseone View Post
    O its obvious is it? Despite less than a quarter of their rigs being operational and only one permit pending its obvious? Well you really believe that than by all means don't back it up.
    You just backed it up, for me. 'Preciate ya'!
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    You just backed it up, for me. 'Preciate ya'!
    O good lord are you going to explain anything or just yell and scream, shut youre ears and try to shout over reality?

  3. #43
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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiseone View Post
    O good lord are you going to explain anything or just yell and scream, shut youre ears and try to shout over reality?
    As you so kindly pointed out, only a quarter of their rigs are operational and they only have one permit pending. If the moratorium wasn't in effect, they would have permits issued and more operational rigs.

    Ya see, the way it works in a business, with rolling stock, is that equipment has to be working and making money, so as to put more equipment into the field, to work and make more money. It ain't clock surgery.
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    As you so kindly pointed out, only a quarter of their rigs are operational and they only have one permit pending. If the moratorium wasn't in effect, they would have permits issued and more operational rigs.

    Ya see, the way it works in a business, with rolling stock, is that equipment has to be working and making money, so as to put more equipment into the field, to work and make more money. It ain't clock surgery.
    Except:
    1) You have no idea if that permit would not been approved anyway. The oil spill certainly has made it more difficult to get new permits however you are assuming Seahawk's permit is good enough to have passed a pre-oil spill check, you are simply assuming it would have been approved.
    2) You assume that one new permit would have saved this company. It is possible that given the amount of time required after getting a permit to actually put a rig into place it wouldn't have made a difference, and its possible that even if that rig could have been in place and pumping instantly after approval that it would have produced enough to save the company. You assume both that SeaHawk had enough financial health to stay alive long enough to place its new rig in place and you assume that once the rig was in place its earnings would save the entire company.

    You must prove those assumptions and if you do I will wholeheartedly agree with you.

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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiseone View Post
    Except:
    1) You have no idea if that permit would not been approved anyway. The oil spill certainly has made it more difficult to get new permits however you are assuming Seahawk's permit is good enough to have passed a pre-oil spill check, you are simply assuming it would have been approved.
    2) You assume that one new permit would have saved this company. It is possible that given the amount of time required after getting a permit to actually put a rig into place it wouldn't have made a difference, and its possible that even if that rig could have been in place and pumping instantly after approval that it would have produced enough to save the company. You assume both that SeaHawk had enough financial health to stay alive long enough to place its new rig in place and you assume that once the rig was in place its earnings would save the entire company.

    You must prove those assumptions and if you do I will wholeheartedly agree with you.
    There have only been 6 drilling permits issued, since Obama officially lifted the drilling moratorium. You do the math.
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    There have only been 6 drilling permits issued, since Obama officially lifted the drilling moratorium. You do the math.
    Ok now seriously do you really believe that addresses any point I made or are you just too embarrassed to admit you don't know necessary information to justify your opinion?

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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Catawba;1059291855]If you want to address a problem, it helps to know what caused it. Just sticking your head in the sand over the last 40 years does nothing.
    I personally think most people know what the problem is, and when it started, but sticking your head in the sand now, and worrying about the past does nothing to solve the problem today.


    "An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), under United States environmental law, is a document required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for certain actions "significantly affecting the quality of the human environment".[1] An EIS is a tool for decision making. It describes the positive and negative environmental effects of a proposed action, and it usually also lists one or more alternative actions that may be chosen instead of the action described in the EIS."
    Environmental impact statement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    All that information is passed on to the group doing the design work, before drawings are ever submitted for approval. The job of the permitting office is to confirm that what they had been given is already in their drawings and specs. It's as simple as that. 3 to 5 years to obtain a permitt is just plain politics, and nothing else.


    Agreed. The American public will make the decision in any case.
    agreed



    I believe the term for conservative Democrats is blue-dog Democrats.
    and I believe an awful lot of them were voted out in the 2010 elections were they not ?

    The fact of the matter is we can do more through energy conservation than our remaining cheap oil supplies will allow, and we are not adding to GW in the process. We have to think long-term and not continue to choose short-term "fixes" that create worse long-term problems.
    Again let me make it clear, I'm not arguing against conserving, that is a good thing, the only point I'm trying to make, is that by drilling and using our own oil, while conserving, and while furthering our research into an affordable alternate, can't do any harm, and in the short term do nothing but good. In my opinion, it would beat running out of oil, and shutting down our economy for however long it took to find that alternate fuel. Also any money it saves being shipped out to the middle east is just a plus. Again it's not the solution, most I know agree with that, but it's a way to lessen our need of imported oil, create jobs, and keep the cost of oil somewhat reasonable while the search for our alternate fuel continues.

    Not at all. We have the capacity to conserve more oil than we get from the ME, which would free up the trillions we are spending on wars to keep the oil flowing that could then be used to help build our clean energy infrastructure. Passive solar design, for example, is not a new concept. The construction of passive solar buildings date back at least as far as our Colonial period. There is much that can be done to conserve our energy needs with known technologies and concepts that are not being done on a wide scale basis. But because, we have been too complacent over the last 40 years, yes, there will be a price to pay. And the longer we wait to act, the more painful the transition will be. You can't ignore a known problem for 40 years and be all surprised by the consequences of your actions when the pain is felt.
    The problem with many of the things we have now, like solar panels, is they just aren't affordable, I personally looked at switching to solar for my own home, and the price range was around $50,000. Wind altho price wise is rather cheap, I think many will have the same complaints as they do oil, and that is what it does to the landscape, those wind turbines 3 stories tall and 20 to 30 of them on a 40 acre plot are no more appealing then one oil well pumping away on the same 40 acres.
    This is why I say, that anything that is remotely going to replace oil, is still years out. The quickest that I'm aware of for our autos is going to be natural gas, and again personally I have no idea what the hold up on that is.

    I don't think we are really that far apart on many things, and I agree that we should have been doing some of this stuff after the gas shortages of the 70's. We didn't however, and it does no good to look back and place blame, there is enough of that to go around on all sides. We need to look for solutions now, not who is to blame, or why we didn't take action sooner, that is history, and can't be changed.
    Last edited by The Barbarian; 02-18-11 at 07:16 AM.

  8. #48
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    Re: Seahawk Drilling seeks bankruptcy, to sell assets

    Quote Originally Posted by The Barbarian View Post
    All that information is passed on to the group doing the design work, before drawings are ever submitted for approval. The job of the permitting office is to confirm that what they had been given is already in their drawings and specs. It's as simple as that. 3 to 5 years to obtain a permitt is just plain politics, and nothing else.
    Thanks for your opinion. However, "The law, a foundation of environmental policy enacted after a 1969 oil spill off Santa Barbara, Calif., requires federal agencies to complete a detailed environmental assessment before approving any potentially damaging project like an offshore oil well."

    "The waiver granted to BP in April 2009, as part of the permitting process for the doomed well, was based on the company’s claim that a blowout was unlikely and that if a spill did occur, it would cause minimal damage."

    "The Interior Department’s Minerals Management Service, recently renamed the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, issued hundreds of these exemptions in recent years to reduce the paperwork burden for oil companies seeking new wells and for government workers. As a result, there was no meaningful plan in place to cope with the BP spill and its impact on aquatic life and gulf shorelines."
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/17/sc...h/17drill.html

    Again let me make it clear, I'm not arguing against conserving, that is a good thing, the only point I'm trying to make, is that by drilling and using our own oil, while conserving, and while furthering our research into an affordable alternate, can't do any harm, and in the short term do nothing but good. In my opinion, it would beat running out of oil, and shutting down our economy for however long it took to find that alternate fuel. Also any money it saves being shipped out to the middle east is just a plus. Again it's not the solution, most I know agree with that, but it's a way to lessen our need of imported oil, create jobs, and keep the cost of oil somewhat reasonable while the search for our alternate fuel continues.
    And I have no objections to drilling as long as the proper safety, health, and environmental impacts are assessed to avoid future oil spills like the historic one in the Gulf. But, like the oil companies themselves, I understand it will have minimal impact our our supply and therefore is likely to have little effect on oil prices or the shock to our economy caused by peak oil.


    The problem with many of the things we have now, like solar panels, is they just aren't affordable, I personally looked at switching to solar for my own home, and the price range was around $50,000.
    You need to do some more shopping around. I purchased a 1.5 Kw solar panel system for less than $10,000. Projected payback due to savings on electric bill expected to be about 6 years. Passive solar design requires no new technlology, we have know how to do it for centuries and it can reduce energy needs for heating and cooling buildings by by 50 - 60%


    Wind altho price wise is rather cheap, I think many will have the same complaints as they do oil, and that is what it does to the landscape, those wind turbines 3 stories tall and 20 to 30 of them on a 40 acre plot are no more appealing then one oil well pumping away on the same 40 acres.
    Wind is renewable, while oil is a finite resource. We haven't produced as much oil as we consune since 1971. We have to use all of our alternatives.

    This is why I say, that anything that is remotely going to replace oil, is still years out.
    Yes, I know that's what you've said and I've shown you there is much we can do right now and are not doing.

    The quickest that I'm aware of for our autos is going to be natural gas, and again personally I have no idea what the hold up on that is.
    Could it be that natural gas is not the affordable solution you think it is?

    I don't think we are really that far apart on many things, and I agree that we should have been doing some of this stuff after the gas shortages of the 70's. We didn't however, and it does no good to look back and place blame, there is enough of that to go around on all sides. We need to look for solutions now, not who is to blame, or why we didn't take action sooner, that is history, and can't be changed.
    It is important to be aware of history so that the same mistakes aren't made over and over again. Our wasteful practices for the last 40 years brought us to where we are. Until that realization is made we cannot make the kind of conservation efforts that need to be made. We cannot sustain using 25% of the planets resources, so we continue on the path to a bad economy due to high energy costs.
    Last edited by Catawba; 02-18-11 at 02:56 PM.
    Treat the earth well: it was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children. ~ Ancient American Indian Proverb

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