View Poll Results: Parents or Government

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Thread: Video game regulation, parents or the government

  1. #1
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    Video game regulation, parents or the government

    A US Senator has called for a ban for all video games with violent or sexual themes in them. This ban would prevent teenagers (and children) from purchasing violent (and sexual) video games, even with parental permission. There is no scientific evidence linking violence to video games. So who do you think should be in charge of what teens and children play, the parents or the US government? We already have the ESRB, and most stores won't sell mature games to a minor without their parents okaying the transaction or confirming identification. Hell, just the other day at GameStop I saw a man who appeared to be in his 40s get asked for his ID to pre-order a mature game. I too was also asked for my drivers license. I for one am outraged at this, it should be up to the parents, not Uncle Sam.

    Long before "Pong" and "Pac-Man" revolutionized the world of children's entertainment, kids found many ways to play interactive games that included violent themes, such as "Cops and Robbers" or "Cowboys and Indians." Beyond being somewhat politically incorrect, these games contain some violent themes that some parents might find objectionable. Children pretend to rob banks and shoot cops dead; toy guns or imaginary weapons are aimed at opponents; losers are supposed to "play dead." But no one has ever seriously suggested that government should regulate these games on the grounds that they might incite youth violence.

    Fast-forward to the present and the debate over "violent" video game regulation. Some critics and concerned legislators are claiming that the modern day equivalent of Cops and Robbers must be regulated by government to protect minors from the purported ill effects of video games. The logic here is fairly straightforward: If kids are exposed to violent imagery in video games, they will become aggressive children or violent adults later in life. Although unable to muster credible evidence proving this thesis, legislators across America have been introducing measures that would regulate home video games or coin-operated arcade games on these grounds.

    For example, Indianapolis and St. Louis passed laws banning the sale of violent video games to minors. (Both measures were struck down by federal courts as violations of the First Amendment.) And Gov. Gary Locke of Washington recently signed a law that would prohibit the sale of games to minors that depict acts of violence against law enforcement officers (this law is also being challenged in Federal Court and is likely to be struck down as an unconstitutional restriction of protected speech). Now, Congress is getting involved. Rep. Joe Baca (D-Calif.) recently introduced H.R. 669, "The Protect Children from Video Game Sex and Violence Act of 2003." This bill would impose fines on anyone who sells or rents, "any video game that depicts nudity, sexual conduct, or other content harmful to minors."

    There are many problems with such regulatory measures. To start, there's little evidence of a link between video games and aggressive youth. While the video game industry was exploding between 1994 and 2000, juvenile (ages 15-17) violent crime arrests dropped by 44 percent and young adult (ages 18-24) violent crime arrests dropped by 24 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. While that does not necessarily rule out any relationship between video games and youth violence, it should make policymakers pause before rushing to legislate. Major academic and government studies have also looked at the question of video games and youth violence and found no significant correlation.

    Second, self-regulation is working well. In 1994, the video game industry established the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB), a comprehensive labeling system that rates over 1,000 games per year and has rated more than 8,000 games since inception. The ESRB applies five different rating symbols and over 25 different content labels that refer to violence, sex, language, substance abuse, gambling, humor and other potentially sensitive subject matter. It must be a good system because the self-appointed media violence watchdog Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) called the video game rating system "a model" for other industries to follow. Coin-operated video game operators have also devised a descriptive parental advisory labeling scheme for games played in arcades or restaurants. As a result, a descriptive labeling system is available to parents to monitor the video games their children play.

    Third, government regulation could easily cross the line into censorship. If legislators threaten industry with fines or prosecution for mislabeling games, voluntary labeling will likely be abandoned altogether. Parents would lose access to valuable, reliable, and credible information about the age-appropriateness and content of the games they're thinking of buying. Of course, if industry responded to such proposals by abandoning voluntary ratings, lawmakers would quickly allege "market failure" and propose a mandatory rating-and-labeling scheme instead. The courts would not allow legislators to regulate books or magazines in this manner, and there is no reason why video games should be any different.

    Finally, the most powerful case against government regulation or censorship of video games is that it's none of government's business. In a free society, parents should decide what their children see, hear, or play; Uncle Sam should not serve as a surrogate parent. After all, "one-size-fits-all" forms of content regulation are unlikely to recognize that different parents have different definitions of what constitutes acceptable fare for their children. The eye of the beholder makes a difference and in a free society it is the eyes (and ears) of parents that should decide what is in the best interests of their children.
    Regulating Video Games: Parents or Uncle Sam? | Adam D. Thierer | Cato Institute: Daily Commentary

  2. #2
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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    The ratings system for movies works well. There is nothing wrong with a law that says children cannot buy certain games-- parents will always have the option of buying the games themselves and allowing their children to play them.

    It's a very long step from a mandatory ratings system and censorship.

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    Quote Originally Posted by Korimyr the Rat View Post
    The ratings system for movies works well.
    I disagree. The ratings system is broken and doesnt really tell you anything about a game.

    Laws banning the sale of certain games to children are token efforts that dont solve anything, most M games are purchased for children BY their parents.
    I'm Done

    See my last post

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoplite View Post
    Laws banning the sale of certain games to children are token efforts that dont solve anything, most M games are purchased for children BY their parents.
    Then it's the parents' fault, just as if they'd taken their children into an R-rated movie.

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    Quote Originally Posted by Korimyr the Rat View Post
    The ratings system for movies works well. There is nothing wrong with a law that says children cannot buy certain games-- parents will always have the option of buying the games themselves and allowing their children to play them.

    It's a very long step from a mandatory ratings system and censorship.
    The law would make it so they cannot posess them either. But that couldn't really be enforced. It's not like the police would get a warrant to search someone's house for violent video games.

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    I do not mind the rating system and laws dictating what MINORS can or can not buy.At the same time if the parents want to buy little Timmy Grand Theft Auto 4 or Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 then that is the parents business there should be no criminalizing the possession of video games.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    Joe Baca and Gary Locke are republicans right?

    There is nothing wrong with a law that says children cannot buy certain games
    The cost of drafting the legislation is wrong. Penalizing companies that do sell games to children anyways is wrong. Forcing people to restrict the sale of products is wrong. It doesn't matter if Mommy can still do it.

    The ratings system is broken and doesnt really tell you anything about a game.
    Perhaps you'd rather the market use Recreational Software Advisory Council - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    It tells you if there's titties, guts and f-bombs, as if a giant M and cover art with guns and gore isn't enough.

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    This law seems like it would do absolutely nothing. If the parent wants the kid to have the game, they'll just buy it for them (which they probably do now anyway).
    If you build a man a fire, he'll be warm for a day.

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    Parents should do their own damm jobs and stop running to the government like ****ing pansies.
    Jackboots always come in matched pairs, a left boot and a right boot.

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    Re: Video game regulation, parents or the government

    Quote Originally Posted by From The Article
    "The Protect Children from Video Game Sex and Violence Act of 2003." This bill would impose fines on anyone who sells or rents, "any video game that depicts nudity, sexual conduct, or other content harmful to minors."
    The wording here is confusing. Does it mean that video game companies are not allowed to sell or rent out video games whose content depicts nudity, sexual conduct, or other things we don't want to expose children to just children or to anyone?

    I don't mind government regulation for the former if it helps parents keep their children away from things they don't want their kids exposed to. If they're trying to do the latter, it's censorship, and I'm against it.
    Also, we need to legalize recreational drugs and prostitution.

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