Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 51

Thread: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

  1. #11
    Professor

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Last Seen
    11-21-14 @ 03:20 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Liberal
    Posts
    2,120

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by rivrrat View Post
    And they dropped the charges from 35,000 to 5000.



    It's not a ripoff as long as people willingly pay for it. A service is worth as much as someone is willing to pay.
    It also doesn't change the fact that it's ****ty customer service to even allow a customer's bill to get that high (unless it's common) without informing them. If I had T-Mobile, I'd probably drop them having heard that story. Not because it's not their right to charge people, but I'd expect a little better customer service for what I'm paying them. I'd cancel my credit card if they let it get up to an exhorbitant amount without confirming with me (because it could have been stolen, just as her phone could have been).

    And, honestly, I didn't even know there were pay-per-text plans out there anymore.

  2. #12
    Goddess of Bacon

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Last Seen
    05-28-12 @ 09:35 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    13,988

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post

    Right. And from a business perspective, what do you think is a better business strategy?
    The better business strategy is to charge people what they're willing to pay.


    A) Educating your customers about the economics of text messaging, and explaining to a frantic customer who volunteered in Haiti (and now, to the media as well) why the whole mess is all her fault.
    B) Just reversing the damn charge, since it didn't cost the company anything in the first place.
    None of this has anything to do with the "good business" or "ripoff" stuff I was referring to since it's completely out of context. I said that responding to a statement from you about the GENERAL use and cost of texting for all telecom companies. NOT in relation to any specific incident.

  3. #13
    Goddess of Bacon

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Last Seen
    05-28-12 @ 09:35 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    13,988

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by FilmFestGuy View Post
    It also doesn't change the fact that it's ****ty customer service to even allow a customer's bill to get that high (unless it's common) without informing them. If I had T-Mobile, I'd probably drop them having heard that story. Not because it's not their right to charge people, but I'd expect a little better customer service for what I'm paying them. I'd cancel my credit card if they let it get up to an exhorbitant amount without confirming with me (because it could have been stolen, just as her phone could have been).

    And, honestly, I didn't even know there were pay-per-text plans out there anymore.
    Well, from a business perspective it makes sense just to cut the service off once a bill reaches a certain point.

  4. #14
    Cheese
    Aunt Spiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sasnakra
    Last Seen
    09-10-16 @ 06:10 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    28,433

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    No, I'm not feeling for her. Sure - companies do lie, mislead and PLOT to get money - of course!

    But she thought "Oh - fees are being waved" and texted to her heart's content - out the wazoo. I'd like to know just how many "free" text messages she thought she was sending and receiving. She, in my opinion, was taking advantage of the company's free-offer (she thought she was) - would she *normally* have texted that much? Likely not - she thought she was getting *all this much service for free* - which is the *wrong* mindset.

    Just because someone *thinks* something is for free doesn't mean they should ABUSE that freedom. It's like going into a bank and they have a free-candy jar. Someone might take one or two - but some ASSHOLE will take it ALL.

    It's ok to be offered something *for free* and take advantage of the nice offer. . . and then RETURN that niceness with *more* niceness by *not taking all the candy out of the candy jar* - or the greedy dude at the buffet piling his plate sky high (if the candy jar doesn't work for you).

    I think she deserves the headache - sure, they could have likely informed her *better* or done something more than just send her the mega bill - of course.
    BUT - if she wasn't taking advantage of the offer then she wouldn't have been shafted, now would she?

    If I was dealing with her (and she's not the only one in this pickle, most likely) then I'd say "let's look at your last 6 months of bills and find the average # of texts in your lifestyle and compare it to this period in question. Anything beyond average during this time in question - we'll charge you for per our agreement, anything at or below - we'll waive the fees for completely."
    Last edited by Aunt Spiker; 10-14-10 at 06:48 PM.
    A screaming comes across the sky.
    It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now.
    Pynchon - Gravity's Rainbow

  5. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Last Seen
    01-10-12 @ 12:19 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Liberal
    Posts
    906

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    I wish they had left the bill at 35k.

  6. #16
    Enemy Combatant
    Kandahar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Last Seen
    10-15-13 @ 08:47 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    20,688

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker View Post
    No, I'm not feeling for her. Sure - companies do lie, mislead and PLOT to get money - of course!

    But she thought "Oh - fees are being waved" and texted to her heart's content - out the wazoo. I'd like to know just how many "free" text messages she thought she was sending and receiving. She, in my opinion, was taking advantage of the company's free-offer (she thought she was) - would she *normally* have texted that much? Likely not - she thought she was getting *all this much service for free* - which is the *wrong* mindset.

    Just because someone *thinks* something is for free doesn't mean they should ABUSE that freedom. It's like going into a bank and they have a free-candy jar. Someone might take one or two - but some ASSHOLE will take it ALL.

    It's ok to be offered something *for free* and take advantage of the nice offer. . . and then RETURN that niceness with *more* niceness by *not taking all the candy out of the candy jar* - or the greedy dude at the buffet piling his plate sky high (if the candy jar doesn't work for you).
    There are a couple of problems with that analogy. If some asshole takes all the candy out of the candy jar, there is no candy left for everyone else. On the other hand, the fact that she sent a lot of text messages doesn't mean that there are less text messages available for everyone else. Furthermore, it costs the store money to put those candies in the candy jar. It costs T-Mobile nothing to send a text message.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker
    I think she deserves the headache - sure, they could have likely informed her *better* or done something more than just send her the mega bill - of course.
    BUT - if she wasn't taking advantage of the offer then she wouldn't have been shafted, now would she?
    If she believed that they were free (whether that belief was justified or not), then it would make sense for her to text more. That's "taking advantage of the offer" - but not in a negative way.


    Story time: Up until about a year ago, I was on my parents' family cell phone plan with Verizon. We each had a fixed number of minutes; I have no idea how many, because none of us ever came close to exceeding the limit. One month, my firm was replacing our work phones, so I started using my cell phone for work purposes. I was on the phone for at least an hour every day. At the end of the month, I had a huge phone bill (several hundred dollars). Should I have known how many minutes I was entitled to? Yes, of course. But it never even occurred to me that I had a limit, because I had never been close to exceeding it in the past.

    When I called Verizon to complain, they were apologetic. They put me on the unlimited-minutes plan going forward, and retroactively applied it to the past month where I had incurred the huge charges. They never once tried to blame me for the situation. After all, it's not like my calls cost them any more money by exceeding my allotted minutes than they would have if I had just been on the unlimited plan from the start.

    That was good customer service. T-Mobile should do the same thing here.
    Last edited by Kandahar; 10-14-10 at 09:36 PM.
    Are you coming to bed?
    I can't. This is important.
    What?
    Someone is WRONG on the internet! -XKCD

  7. #17
    Outer space potato man

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Seen
    Today @ 06:40 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    51,828

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    Text messages cost literally zero dollars to transmit, but somehow the customer is the bad guy here. Jesus Christ is there anything that regressives wont let business get away with?
    He touched her over her bra and underpants, she says, and guided her hand to touch him over his underwear
    Quote Originally Posted by Lutherf View Post
    We’ll say what? Something like “nothing happened” ... Yeah, we might say something like that.

  8. #18
    Global Moderator
    Truth will set you free
    digsbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Metro Washington DC
    Last Seen
    Today @ 06:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    18,984

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    The business didn't have to cut the cost of her bill by $30,000. They're businesses and she signed up to the terms of her contract. They specifically said voice plans were waived, yet she chose to text. Yeah I think $5,000 is too expensive, but the company has the right to do that. This lady should have checked with her carrier before sending $35,000 in text messages. She consented to a contract that listed charges for services. Sure I feel sorry for her, but let's not vilify T-mobile.
    When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. -Socrates
    Tired of elections being between the lesser of two evils.

  9. #19
    Cheese
    Aunt Spiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sasnakra
    Last Seen
    09-10-16 @ 06:10 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    28,433

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    Text messages cost literally zero dollars to transmit, but somehow the customer is the bad guy here. Jesus Christ is there anything that regressives wont let business get away with?
    If someone doesn't approve of the costs of things that are written out in their contract - they shouldn't sign the contract and shouldn't agree to it.

    I know for certain I read my cellphone contract - I still have my copy - and know how much internatinoal and all other charges would cost me.

    IF I, at any point, was offered a paper-waiver to SIGN - I would read that, too.
    I would also ask questions such as "does this cover ONLY mobile to mobile? Cellphone?" . . . cover all your bases so you dont' get screwed.

    Not my fault - or the company's fault - that SHE assumed *wrong* and didn't *ask* any questions.
    Last edited by Aunt Spiker; 10-19-10 at 08:40 AM.
    A screaming comes across the sky.
    It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now.
    Pynchon - Gravity's Rainbow

  10. #20
    Doesn't go below juicy
    tacomancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cleveland
    Last Seen
    05-20-16 @ 02:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    31,781

    Re: Shocking phone-bill horror stories motivate regulators

    All of this can be solved by having the phone company send a notification to the user. This would allow the user to make more informed choices. I believe there is already a system in place with most US mobile phone companies to do this.
    Last edited by tacomancer; 10-19-10 at 09:49 AM.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •