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Thread: A turning point for American healthcare.

  1. #21
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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Premiums have been rising.

    Partisan hacks are just looking for an excuse to point a finger.

    Health care premiums have been rising with NO Obama, NO Democratic controlled House, NO Democratic controlled Senate, NO health care bill.

    But now all of a sudden it's the fault of all of the above...




    Premium payments for healthcare insurance paid by firms in the US for their employees have doubled over the past ten years. Whereas, the costs incurred by employees on healthcare, has tripled.

    Healthcare Costs to Skyrocket Next Year | TopNews United States


    Since 2005, employee contributions to health insurance costs have risen 47 percent, according to a survey released last week by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Insurance Trust.

    Health insurance costs expected to surge - SignOnSanDiego.com

    Since 1999, health insurance premiums for families rose 131%, the report found, far more than the general rate of inflation, which increased 28% over the same period.

    Health Insurance Premiums Up 131% in Last Ten Years - It's Your Money - TIME.com
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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by BWG View Post
    Premiums have been rising.

    Partisan hacks are just looking for an excuse to point a finger.

    Health care premiums have been rising with NO Obama, NO Democratic controlled House, NO Democratic controlled Senate, NO health care bill.

    But now all of a sudden it's the fault of all of the above...
    Yeah, but don't mess with a popular narrative.

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  3. #23
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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by MaggieD View Post
    Nope. Making it a requirement makes the risk pool MORE healthy, not less.
    Not at all, remember I work in this industry. There are high risk companies that specialize in unhealthy insurance and are going to be squeezed out of the market due to the new bill, as well group policies exist because of the nature of PECs and even though individuals don't see rediculous premiums employers most certainly do(the trade off to the individual is no portability). When the PECs are eliminated AND people are forced to buy insurance people who otherwise would have sought out options more geared towards their needs will be forced into the overall pool, thus the risk is skewed up, not down. Again, the only people who asserted that the pool will go down in risk are a bunch of clueless politicians with no working knowledge of the health industry and frankly no real world experience to boot.
    Unless you believe that there are more unhealthy people in the U.S. than healthy
    This is the least healthy time in American history. remember all the news stories saying how overweight we are?
    Or unless you believe the majority of uninsured people are unhealthy, in which case, post your link.
    Why do you need a link? It's common sense that many people do not buy insurance because they are trying to get into shape and/or stop habits that increase their premiums such as smoking or heavy drinking, as well many people have credit problems which btw is a secondary reason that will come back to bite insureds if coverage grace period increases become mandated.
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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by LaMidRighter View Post
    Not at all, remember I work in this industry. There are high risk companies that specialize in unhealthy insurance and are going to be squeezed out of the market due to the new bill, as well group policies exist because of the nature of PECs and even though individuals don't see rediculous premiums employers most certainly do(the trade off to the individual is no portability). When the PECs are eliminated AND people are forced to buy insurance people who otherwise would have sought out options more geared towards their needs will be forced into the overall pool, thus the risk is skewed up, not down. Again, the only people who asserted that the pool will go down in risk are a bunch of clueless politicians with no working knowledge of the health industry and frankly no real world experience to boot. This is the least healthy time in American history. remember all the news stories saying how overweight we are? Why do you need a link? It's common sense that many people do not buy insurance because they are trying to get into shape and/or stop habits that increase their premiums such as smoking or heavy drinking, as well many people have credit problems which btw is a secondary reason that will come back to bite insureds if coverage grace period increases become mandated.
    No offense, LA, but your working in the industry in no way discounts what I've said.

    First bolded sentence: Just what are these "other options more geared toward their needs?" People with pre-existing conditions need HEALTH INSURANCE. There ARE no other options.

    Second bolded portion: It's not common sense at all. It is common sense that young people with many other priorities for their money who are NOT covered by group plans are quite healthy and simply choose not to purchase insurance. It's common sense also that those not covered by group policies simply cannot AFFORD (or think they cannot afford) individual ones.

    This is far from the most unhealthy period in American history. The problem we have is that technology has outstripped our ability to pay for it. So those that HAVE get. Those that don't have CAN'T. The insurance model hasn't changed much in a hundred years, I'd bet. Yet our lifespans are ever increasing and technology is ever advancing. We treat fatal illnesses with the same aggressiveness that we treat cureable ones, right up until we put these unfortunate souls in the ground. Capitalism at its finest.

    A link? Link me to one of these companies that provides insurance for people who are insulin-dependent; those who have had a diagnosis of cancer at any time during their lives; those with HepC; transplants. If there are any, they are prohibitively expensive, meant only for the rich.
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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kal'Stang View Post
    I would like to say however that the one thing that I do agree with on the HCR is the part that makes it to where insurers cannot deny coverage to someone due to a pre-existing condition.
    Pre-existing limitations were never as bad as democrats made them out to be / or to speak like Boo Radley, were never as bad as democrats fear mongered them out to be.

    However, I do have to say I like the way HIPPA fixed them a bunch of years ago.
    Last edited by buck; 09-29-10 at 06:23 PM.

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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    I am a healthy individual, and will seriously consider dropping my insurance and just paying the fine to save a buttload of money. Then, when I get sick, i'll just sign up for the insurance.

    We've already been warned that our premiums are going up a lot this year, in large part due to these changes. i'll make my decision at annual enrollment time.

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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by buck View Post
    I am a healthy individual, and will seriously consider dropping my insurance and just paying the fine to save a buttload of money. Then, when I get sick, i'll just sign up for the insurance.

    We've already been warned that our premiums are going up a lot this year, in large part due to these changes. i'll make my decision at annual enrollment time.
    So, tomorrow when you suddenly can't move your legs and they give you a diagnosis of Guillian Barre syndrome - which would land you in ICU within the week and take 2 years rehab - who are you going to sign up with?
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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by bowerbird View Post
    So, tomorrow when you suddenly can't move your legs and they give you a diagnosis of Guillian Barre syndrome - which would land you in ICU within the week and take 2 years rehab - who are you going to sign up with?
    My firend had Guillian Barre syndrome (I always preffered calling it Roseann Barr syndrome), and he was not in the ICU and his legs worked just fine. He was tired for a month or two.

    Anyway, I think the risk of that (or any sudden onset such as that) occuring is pretty slim and is a chance I am willing to take. However, I would figure out what the diagnosis might be based on my symptoms, if it seemed like something serious, I would sign up for insurance as quickly as I can. Probably before I even go to the doctor.
    Last edited by buck; 09-29-10 at 07:03 PM.

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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by buck View Post
    My firend had Guillian Barre syndrome (I always preffered calling it Roseann Barr syndrome) and he was not in the ICU and his legs worked just fine. However, he was tired for a month or two. Anyway, I think the risk of that (or any sudden onset such as that) occuring is pretty slim and is a chance I am willing to take. However, I would sign up for insurance as quickly as I can, probably before I even go to the doctor. If it turned out to be nothing, I will cancel my policy and wait for the next such onset. If it turns out to be something, I would probably end up keeping the policy.
    I got diagnosed with a very rare heart condition. The bills are the worst part of this.

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    Re: A turning point for American healthcare.

    Quote Originally Posted by winston53660 View Post
    I got diagnosed with a very rare heart condition. The bills are the worst part of this.
    The way it is now, you could have saved all the money you spent on insurance (assuming you had insurance) in years past and payed the fine. Then, when you start having these symptoms and think it's something serious, you sign up for the insurance, go to the doctor and the insurance company has to pay the bills. If worse comes to worse, you just sign up for the government's high risk pool - which I have little doubt will be a mess. With all that money you saved on health insurance premiums, you can pay all the bills that were left over (not payed by insurance). For the person that doesn't fall victim to catastrophic illness (most of us), they just had a nice little profit.

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