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Thread: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

  1. #31
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    Re: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

    I don't think there necessarily needs to be a statute against swearing in and of itself. Disorderly conduct laws should suffice to encompass situations that merit swearing that may have a detrimental impact on what is expected of people in public venues. Are you going to arrest everyone in the crowd at a Slayer concert at the local ampitheater? No, because its not distracting and is expected. Someone cussing loudly in a library? Yeah, they need to be disciplined.
    "Loyalty only matters when there's a hundred reasons not to be-" Gen. Mattis

  2. #32
    User HeresToThePoint's Avatar
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    Re: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

    I believe righteousness does not supersede form. By that I mean, just because you think you are right does not mean you can be a *** about it.

    Times change - whats offensive today, could very well be a sign of respect tomorrow, and forgotten the next. The legislation of censorship only displays a limited mental flexibility of a given time. One example, The Catcher in the Rye was so "offensive" that it became the most censored book in America even though it was not more offensive than common teen-age slang at the time. Now, its just a bad porno crossed with stereotypical juvenile delinquent behavior that was required reading for me in High School.

    A modern example of this would be the "Draw Mohammad Day" (YouTube - Draw Mohammad Day 20th May 2010) largely promoted by YouTube user thunderf00t. In thunderf00t's case his freedom of speech, some argue, crossed a ethical line. Although I'm an atheist, relating someone's prophet or god to a pedo-bear seems like a bit of a low blow - one could only imagine how angry Muslims around the world are. Maybe Mohammad was a man of his time, a similar justification for our Founding Father's slave ownership. Mohammad's actions could be further justified by the significantly shorter life span of humans in his day. But I digress. There are more reasonable ways to convey and opinion than rash insults. That being said, should YouTube have censored thunderf00t? Absolutely not.

    I think a good community written/verbal spanking or protest is an adequate response to a poorly thought out statement offends you. Blocking or criminally prosecuting ideas or speech simply because it makes someone , or even a majority of people (as long as it isn't libel, slander, advocate malicious/illegal behavior), unhappy is simply bad form. Theres plenty of dictators committing genocide around the world, many times more offensive than a couple four letter words. Why complain with a temporary shock or offense that will fade over time, when theres serious permanent loss of human life in the world?

    I generally don't approve of being a *******, but being a ***** isn't a proper response either.

    Respectfully, HTTP
    Last edited by HeresToThePoint; 05-31-10 at 07:27 AM.

  3. #33
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    Re: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

    Quote Originally Posted by Korimyr the Rat View Post
    Citizens demonstrate that they are responsible moral agents by obeying the laws of a just government. If the citizens refuse to behave responsibly, it is the government's obligation to correct them.
    I disagree in this case. If a government demands political obedience from a person it cannot deny a person the moral responsibility to form their own convictions and express them to others as they see fit. If it does, the government looses its claim to legitimate power over that person. This is because by censoring speech you are essentially saying that persons convictions make them unworthy participants, it is no different than denying that person an equal vote.

  4. #34
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    Re: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

    Quote Originally Posted by Korimyr the Rat View Post
    Because it is the government's business to uphold societal standards. This is as important, if not moreso, than its other functions.
    People have been cursing without laws preventing them to for years. How has cursing adversely affected our standards?

    Quote Originally Posted by Korimyr the Rat View Post
    It isn't semantics. It's an issue of having respect for the people around you.
    How is the word sh*t different than poop or cr*p from crud?
    "Doubleplusungood"

    George Orwell

  5. #35
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    Re: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

    Quote Originally Posted by LaMidRighter View Post
    Profanity when used correctly is a proper tool, it shows frustration, can punctuate a comedic remark, allows people to know you are at that line where you just might kick the **** out of them......etc. etc. While I do believe in many of the tests against obscenity I do not consider profanity to be part of that test, one of my few breakings from that court decision. Besides all that though, profane words are pretty arbitrary anyway, what exactly makes **** different from caca, crap, etc. they all describe fecal matter. As well **** is the exact same thing as screw, plow, etc. so it really is a game of pure semantics anyway.
    LaMidRighter, I do agree, and also think that it is better to let off steam before it blows fuel in the form of a fist in the freaking face of someone or a foot up the back side ( a$$ ) of somebody's butt !!!
    Some people are very talented in blowing the cool of another person with a word, look or gesture....So what is a good response or a perfect reply ???

  6. #36
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    Re: U.S. rights group sues to protect right to swear

    I dont think anybody should be arrested for swearing. It should simply be treated in the way that any bad mannered behaviour is treated.

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