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Thread: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

  1. #131
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by Hatuey View Post
    Lol. Doctors are going to quit if Health Bill passes? Where are they going to work? MacDonalds? lmao.
    A good number of them have already closed their private practices. Some of the GP's that I know are looking at alternative careers. As for how many more get out of private practice or leave the profession altogether, only time will tell.
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzie View Post
    A good number of them have already closed their private practices. Some of the GP's that I know are looking at alternative careers. As for how many more get out of private practice or leave the profession altogether, only time will tell.
    No, I don't believe that is true. Can you link anything verifiable to show this.

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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzie View Post
    Many of them are now what we know as "hospitalists". These are basically doctors who contract with hospitals to see patients who are hospitalized, but they don't have a private practice. It cuts out the overhead costs of running a private practice.
    Some of them will join a specialty group to provide on-call services or perform specific services for that specialty group (as an example, I have a friend who was a family practice physician for about 20 years. He now works for a cardiology group taking night call and reading EKG's for them).
    If this is true, it happened before reform.

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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    No, I don't believe that is true. Can you link anything verifiable to show this.
    I'm speaking from personal knowledge and observation, but I'll see if I can find you some published information.
    "God is the name by which I designate all things which cross my path violently and recklessly, all things which alter my plans and intentions, and change the course of my life, for better or for worse."
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Related article links:

    According to the Society of Hospital Medicine (2007a), a hospitalist is a physician "whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Hospitalists' activities include patient care, teaching, research, and leadership related to Hospital Medicine." The field of hospital medicine has experienced tremendous growth since Wachter and Goldman (1996) coined the term "hospitalists" in 1996. In the mid-1990s, there were approximately 800 hospitalists in the United States; today, that number is approaching 15,000, with the anticipation that by 2010, the number will exceed 20,000 (Society of Hospital Medicine 2007b).
    http://www.entrepreneur.com/tradejou...icle/174372609

    ---------------------

    David Yu, MD, learned early on the value of being flexible. While attending Washington University in St. Louis, he found his calling when he changed his major from economics to biology. When the malpractice insurance crisis forced him to close his private practice, he embraced an opportunity to launch a program devoted to the “newfangled concept” of hospital medicine.
    The Accidental Hospitalist :: Article - The Hospitalist

    ------------------------

    Banda says it was virtually no choice at all. While he did see outpatients initially after taking the position, he moved to inpatient care full time in 2003.
    “At the end of the day, I realized that half of my time, I was not seeing patients,” he says. “[Being a hospitalist] definitely took me away from having to manage these things and let me spend more time managing patients, which is what I was better at.”
    Advertisement | Advertising

    Banda now is one of 20 hospitalists at Baton Rouge General, specializing in internal medicine and pediatrics


    For ob-gyn Dr. Jan Benanti, a phone call from her mother was what clinched her move into a hospitalist position after almost 15 years in private practice. Although Benanti had a full schedule of patients, she took the day off to be with her mother while her father underwent minor surgery. That experience confirmed for Benanti that being on call 24-7 with work hours that involved making rounds, treating patients at the office as well as running back and forth to the hospital for deliveries did not fit with the lifestyle she wanted


    Banda and Benanti say physicians in private practice often seek hospitalist positions because medical school and residencies don’t teach them the business skills necessary to run a practice alone. A newly minted doctor can still work with an already established practice and get by learning the required business savvy on the side. The assumption current 20 years ago that a doctor straight out of medical school could open the doors of a private practice alone is no longer applicable in a world of federal regulations, HMOs, malpractice insurance and a host of other issues that could require a business degree to navigate but have little to do with patient care
    url=http://www.businessreport.com/news/2010/mar/08/general-hospitalists-hlcr1/]:: Baton Rouge Business Report :: General hospitalists[/url]
    Last edited by lizzie; 04-13-10 at 10:54 AM.
    "God is the name by which I designate all things which cross my path violently and recklessly, all things which alter my plans and intentions, and change the course of my life, for better or for worse."
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    and another...

    We're seeing a decrease in the percentage of physicians in general internal medicine with a balanced distribution between inpatient and outpatient services - the traditional office-based general internal medicine physician who also goes to the hospital to treat his or her patients when they need acute care," Kuo said.

    Using the Medicare data, the researchers showed increases in hospitalist care over time for patients with different diagnoses and at hospitals of different sizes, and were able to map regional growth in hospitalist care. In 2006, there was marked geographic variation in the rates of care provided by hospitalists, with rates of more than 70 percent in some hospital referral regions. "Although the growth of care by hospitalists has been greater in certain geographic areas, substantial growth occurred in every area." Kuo said.
    Dramatic Growth In Number Of Hospitalists Revealed By UTMB Study
    "God is the name by which I designate all things which cross my path violently and recklessly, all things which alter my plans and intentions, and change the course of my life, for better or for worse."
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzie View Post
    Now we don't want to confuse Boo with anything that contradicts what he thinks. I know he is going to hate this one since he believes that you can crank out doctors just like car parts off an assembly line. No one has really addresses this problem just like no one has addressed why insured people use ER's instead of their local doctors.

    From the Wall Street Journal:

    The new federal health-care law has raised the stakes for hospitals and schools already scrambling to train more doctors.

    Experts warn there won't be enough doctors to treat the millions of people newly insured under the law. At current graduation and training rates, the nation could face a shortage of as many as 150,000 doctors in the next 15 years, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

    That shortfall is predicted despite a push by teaching hospitals and medical schools to boost the number of U.S. doctors, which now totals about 954,000.

    The greatest demand will be for primary-care physicians. These general practitioners, internists, family physicians and pediatricians will have a larger role under the new law, coordinating care for each patient.

    The U.S. has 352,908 primary-care doctors now, and the college association estimates that 45,000 more will be needed by 2020. But the number of medical-school students entering family medicine fell more than a quarter between 2002 and 2007.

    A shortage of primary-care and other physicians could mean more-limited access to health care and longer wait times for patients.

    Proponents of the new health-care law say it does attempt to address the physician shortage. The law offers sweeteners to encourage more people to enter medical professions, and a 10% Medicare pay boost for primary-care doctors.

    Meanwhile, a number of new medical schools have opened around the country recently. As of last October, four new medical schools enrolled a total of about 190 students, and 12 medical schools raised the enrollment of first-year students by a total of 150 slots, according to the AAMC. Some 18,000 students entered U.S. medical schools in the fall of 2009, the AAMC says.

    But medical colleges and hospitals warn that these efforts will hit a big bottleneck: There is a shortage of medical resident positions. The residency is the minimum three-year period when medical-school graduates train in hospitals and clinics.

    There are about 110,000 resident positions in the U.S., according to the AAMC. Teaching hospitals rely heavily on Medicare funding to pay for these slots. In 1997, Congress imposed a cap on funding for medical residencies, which hospitals say has increasingly hurt their ability to expand the number of positions.

    Medicare pays $9.1 billion a year to teaching hospitals, which goes toward resident salaries and direct teaching costs, as well as the higher operating costs associated with teaching hospitals, which tend to see the sickest and most costly patients.

    Doctors' groups and medical schools had hoped that the new health-care law, passed in March, would increase the number of funded residency slots, but such a provision didn't make it into the final bill.

    "It will probably take 10 years to even make a dent into the number of doctors that we need out there," said Atul Grover, the AAMC's chief advocacy officer.

  8. #138
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by Conservative View Post
    Now we don't want to confuse Boo with anything that contradicts what he thinks. I know he is going to hate this one since he believes that you can crank out doctors just like car parts off an assembly line. No one has really addresses this problem just like no one has addressed why insured people use ER's instead of their local doctors.
    Thanks for the linked article.

    Yes, alot of the posters here don't understand the causes and effects of what is happening in the medical profession. I've been in the field for 27 years. I've watched the decline, and I have lots of friends and acquaintances who are doctors. The crappy attitudes I see among many of the young on this site are exactly part of the problem. There is alot of ignorance regarding the issue, and alot of armchair medical experts cheering for a lost cause.
    "God is the name by which I designate all things which cross my path violently and recklessly, all things which alter my plans and intentions, and change the course of my life, for better or for worse."
    -C G Jung

  9. #139
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by Conservative View Post
    Now we don't want to confuse Boo with anything that contradicts what he thinks. I know he is going to hate this one since he believes that you can crank out doctors just like car parts off an assembly line. No one has really addresses this problem just like no one has addressed why insured people use ER's instead of their local doctors.

    From the Wall Street Journal:

    The new federal health-care law has raised the stakes for hospitals and schools already scrambling to train more doctors.

    Experts warn there won't be enough doctors to treat the millions of people newly insured under the law. At current graduation and training rates, the nation could face a shortage of as many as 150,000 doctors in the next 15 years, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

    That shortfall is predicted despite a push by teaching hospitals and medical schools to boost the number of U.S. doctors, which now totals about 954,000.

    The greatest demand will be for primary-care physicians. These general practitioners, internists, family physicians and pediatricians will have a larger role under the new law, coordinating care for each patient.

    The U.S. has 352,908 primary-care doctors now, and the college association estimates that 45,000 more will be needed by 2020. But the number of medical-school students entering family medicine fell more than a quarter between 2002 and 2007.

    A shortage of primary-care and other physicians could mean more-limited access to health care and longer wait times for patients.

    Proponents of the new health-care law say it does attempt to address the physician shortage. The law offers sweeteners to encourage more people to enter medical professions, and a 10% Medicare pay boost for primary-care doctors.

    Meanwhile, a number of new medical schools have opened around the country recently. As of last October, four new medical schools enrolled a total of about 190 students, and 12 medical schools raised the enrollment of first-year students by a total of 150 slots, according to the AAMC. Some 18,000 students entered U.S. medical schools in the fall of 2009, the AAMC says.

    But medical colleges and hospitals warn that these efforts will hit a big bottleneck: There is a shortage of medical resident positions. The residency is the minimum three-year period when medical-school graduates train in hospitals and clinics.

    There are about 110,000 resident positions in the U.S., according to the AAMC. Teaching hospitals rely heavily on Medicare funding to pay for these slots. In 1997, Congress imposed a cap on funding for medical residencies, which hospitals say has increasingly hurt their ability to expand the number of positions.

    Medicare pays $9.1 billion a year to teaching hospitals, which goes toward resident salaries and direct teaching costs, as well as the higher operating costs associated with teaching hospitals, which tend to see the sickest and most costly patients.

    Doctors' groups and medical schools had hoped that the new health-care law, passed in March, would increase the number of funded residency slots, but such a provision didn't make it into the final bill.

    "It will probably take 10 years to even make a dent into the number of doctors that we need out there," said Atul Grover, the AAMC's chief advocacy officer.
    Actually, this doesn't match her claim. Let me quote it for you:

    A good number of them have already closed their private practices.
    To which I noted that any who did likely did so BEFORE and reform. And I am seeking any factual information that reform has factually led to any significant number leaving. Your article doesn't address that.


    Nor do I believe people won't be seen.

  10. #140
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    Re: Nearly 50 percent of doctors ready to quit medicine if Healthcare bill passes

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzie View Post
    Are you noticing the dates? You are actually supporting my argument. Let me repeat it for you:

    If this is true, it happened before reform.

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