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Thread: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    you dont directly pay its subsidized thru insurance. start payin directly costs will drop. also lets compete for hospitals i say lets put a hospital and dr. on every corner and do away with health insurance. you direct pay for your animals care why not your own?

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Pawlenty just provided proof he is a big business sellout.

    Turning away the injured or the sick is unacceptable. If there is an issue with the condition, the ER staff can do the responsible thing; send those patients to an urgent care facility.

    To refuse treatment is unacceptable. Pawlenty should be asked to resign. We cannot afford to have business-sellout nazis in the Senate or the House.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Quote Originally Posted by b.larset View Post
    you dont directly pay its subsidized thru insurance. start payin directly costs will drop. also lets compete for hospitals i say lets put a hospital and dr. on every corner and do away with health insurance. you direct pay for your animals care why not your own?
    Because animal care doesn't cost $50,000.

    Direct pay for hospital care is not a viable option. Insurance is a must. I say remove big insurance's ability to decide what they will pay for and have done with it.

    I also favor making it illegal for medical doctors to work for insurance companies. This will make it harder for insurance goons to deny necessary treatments.

    Doctors should lose their licenses if they take employment with an insurance company.
    Last edited by Vader; 02-25-10 at 05:25 PM.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    I certainly see possibilities there, but you would again be faced with tax dollars paying for health care. Am I wrong to expect some objection to this?
    I think there would ultimately be less objection to having these types of low-cost clinics than there would be to completely revamping the insurance system. My parents are absolutely freaked about the possibility of losing my mom's doctor. She has a rare terminal illness that she's really struggled with until she found a good doctor who has really helped her. I have hypothyroidism and I have the same feelings about my doctor, who makes evening phone calls to his patients when needed.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    interesting...

    Walk-in clinics are springing up across the country. Currently, there are about 1,200, up from 850 in 2008 and 250 in 2007, according to the Convenient Care Association, a trade association for retail-based convenient care clinics.

    They're run by hospitals, retailers like CVS and Walgreen, community health centers, or nursing schools who diagnose simple maladies, like strep throat or flu, and provide prescriptions, medical advice, or referrals if the problem is beyond their scope. These clinics have caught on in part because they don't require an appointment and tend to be less expensive than visiting the doctor or an emergency room visit. Some take insurance.

    When visiting one, says Dr. Lori Helm, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), ask to have your records forwarded to your doctor, and be sure to tell him about any medication prescribed at the clinic. She says the organization doesn't recommend walk-in clinics for treatment of chronic medical problems.
    10-things-primary-care-physicians-won't-say: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    True. But there would be serious objection to paying for it. And the situation prior wasn't acceptable. We're really not willing to turn people away and let them die. So, something had to be written into law. True, it led to others using the ER, as the market had not addressed this, but the core problem was the turning away of people in need who couldn't pay.
    It's cheaper than the current system.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Quote Originally Posted by jallman View Post
    Another thing I noticed is that the ER also jacks prices up on everything. The same sutures that you pay $20.00 for in the medical offices upstairs will cost $60.00 from the ER. That's just not acceptable to gouge the price in a time of actual emergency. Costs could be kept down for everyone if the hospital paid premium for the staffs' time in the ER but didn't jack up materials costs on top of it.
    They have to recover costs somehow. Remember, EMTALA is an unfunded mandate and someone has to pay for it.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Quote Originally Posted by danarhea View Post
    Before anybody starts making statements about Pawlenty being a heartless Conservative, let's set the ground rules for this discussion, and get it straight on what Pawlenty proposes. He is talking about minor medical conditions, which are not emergencies.

    1) In that context, I don't see Pawlenty's proposal as heartless, but as a realistic idea. Emergency room care for minor conditions is one of the things that his bankrupting our medical care system.

    2) But is Pawlenty's "realistic" idea actually realistic? I don't think so. Minor medical conditions frequently lead to major hospitalizations. So what is the better way to cut costs in the medical system? Turn away minor conditions, to have people admitted to hospitals for long and very expensive stays? Or to keep things as they are, and treat those minor conditions before they flare up and cost orders of magnitude more money? I believe that the second one is best, and ultimately more cost effective.

    In the end, I don't see Pawlenty's proposal to be heartless at all. But I do see it to be poorly thought out, from an economic standpoint. Is there a third solution somewhere out there that we haven't looked at? Some would say that a public option would be that third option, but I disagree. Whatever solution we come up with must not take money from peoples' pockets without their consent. Or should it? If it does, then do we slide down the slippery slope to Socialism? If we do, then is this still America, or do we begin to say goodbye to a system of government that has has worked for more than 2 centuries?

    These are all very perplexing questions, and I would like to hear some thought out answers from everybody on this issue. So, in regard to what I have posted, the discussion in this thread should be as follows:

    Our health care system - Where do we go from here?

    PLEASE - NO TROLLING. If you only come here to bash Bush, Obama, or anybody else, while not offering constructive ideas and / or constructive criticism, then please leave this thread, and do not post. I will be asking moderators to thread ban those who do not stick to the topic at hand, and the discussion on it, along with those who display disruptive behavior.

    Article is here.
    This would take away part of the hospital's need to cross level medical costs to insured patients.

    oh, and if we don't do it, it's Obama's fault.
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    If people can set aside their visceral "oh noes!" reaction, they might see the argument from the other perspective. Because hospitals are losing such a huge amount of money on their ER's, they're closing the ERs and sometimes the hospitals.

    Which one is worse for the community: A solvent hospital with an ER that turns away a small subset of injuries, or an insolvent hospital that closes altogether?
    People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

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    Re: Pawlenty: Let ER's turn away patients to cut costs

    Quote Originally Posted by RightinNYC View Post
    If people can set aside their visceral "oh noes!" reaction, they might see the argument from the other perspective. Because hospitals are losing such a huge amount of money on their ER's, they're closing the ERs and sometimes the hospitals.

    Which one is worse for the community: A solvent hospital with an ER that turns away a small subset of injuries, or an insolvent hospital that closes altogether?
    EMTALA is a good example of why unfunded mandates are wrong. Many hospitals are struggling because of it.

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