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Thread: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, spywa

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    US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, spywa

    I am not sure how reliable this source is.But if its true I wonder how they are going to get that stuff into already released stuff?



    US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, spyware, ransomware and trojans to attack pirates! - Boing Boing

    The hilariously named "Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property" has finally released its report, an 84-page tome that's pretty bonkers. But amidst all that crazy, there's a bit that stands out as particularly insane: a proposal to legalize the use of malware in order to punish people believed to be copying illegally. The report proposes that software would be loaded on computers that would somehow figure out if you were a pirate, and if you were, it would lock your computer up and take all your files hostage until you call the police and confess your crime. This is the mechanism that crooks use when they deploy ransomware. It's just more evidence that copyright enforcers' network strategies are indistinguishable from those used by dictators and criminals. In 2011, the MPAA told Congress that they wanted SOPA and knew it would work because it was the same tactic used by governments in "China, Iran, the UAE, Armenia, Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Bahrain, Burma, Syria, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam." Now they've demanded that Congress legalize an extortion tool invented by organized criminals.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, s

    They would just need to put the stuff into the illegal download stream. It sounds like they basically want to put a RAT into the products. It would backfire on them I think.

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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, s

    Are the Chinese stealing products again?
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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, s

    Morons if true. The problem is not the people who so call steal their stuff.. it is the fact that they steal it not because it is too expensive to buy, but that they cant get access to it because of out of date draconian copywrite laws.
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    US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits,

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    Morons if true. The problem is not the people who so call steal their stuff.. it is the fact that they steal it not because it is too expensive to buy, but that they cant get access to it because of out of date draconian copywrite laws.
    At least you admit that there are laws and you begrudgingly admit they are being broken.

    At least you are consistent in your belief that the public only has to want something in order to justify talking it. Price too high on a Rolls Royce? No problem, just take one for a test drive and don't return it. If the law says you can't? No problem, it is Draconian anyway. Steel away!

    A right not defended is lost. I don't agree with this tactic, but I do agree with their right. If they want to charge $1000 for a movie or song, then that too is their right. As long as I am not forced to buy it.
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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, s

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    I am not sure how reliable this source is.But if its true I wonder how they are going to get that stuff into already released stuff?



    US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, spyware, ransomware and trojans to attack pirates! - Boing Boing

    The hilariously named "Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property" has finally released its report, an 84-page tome that's pretty bonkers. But amidst all that crazy, there's a bit that stands out as particularly insane: a proposal to legalize the use of malware in order to punish people believed to be copying illegally. The report proposes that software would be loaded on computers that would somehow figure out if you were a pirate, and if you were, it would lock your computer up and take all your files hostage until you call the police and confess your crime. This is the mechanism that crooks use when they deploy ransomware. It's just more evidence that copyright enforcers' network strategies are indistinguishable from those used by dictators and criminals. In 2011, the MPAA told Congress that they wanted SOPA and knew it would work because it was the same tactic used by governments in "China, Iran, the UAE, Armenia, Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Bahrain, Burma, Syria, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam." Now they've demanded that Congress legalize an extortion tool invented by organized criminals.
    Talk about Orwellian doublespeak. It's not the pirates that are criminals, it's those who are being stolen from that are the criminals.

    Such efforts are doomed to failure because they are clearly too invasive. Private organizations inserting malicious code and indiscriminately disabling computers is clearly out of bounds.
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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits, s

    The problem I have with this is it will deploty viruses programmed by the friggen morons over at the MPAA and RIAA who cannot even get their overpriced disk encoding correct so how the hell are they going to make a virus that doesn't destroy many unrelated computers? To give you an idea my father owned satellite way back before dish network when you had a huge dish and scanned the sky for a bunch of different satellites. You could get unscrambled premium movie channels for a while. Eventually they scrambled the channels and you had to get a box. Of course, there were pirate boxes. Of course, the entertainment companies didn't like this, but because they had no reverse signal they decided it would be best to send electronic bullets through the system that would screw up any box they wanted to. If you were legit they just gave you a new box. Of course, that might involve mailing or lots of travel. This is how these stupid morons do this sort of thing because they don't care about their customers because they have a monopoly and are allowed to run rampant like a bunch of dufuses.

    I see the point about piracy. My only complaint is certain media outlets are forcing cable and satellite on us when they could be offering their programs on the internet, but that is their choice. I just simply do not watch their crap. However, i know they are going to start screwing up people's internet and computers because they want scanware and all sorts of other BS monitoring every one of our moves. The people who really should get piracy protection, the ones whop do not have a giant media distributor like cable or the movie theaters of america and are putting stuff out themselves online are not going to be protected by any of this. If you cannot afford to pay lindsey lohan her outrageous salary for whatever crapfest her and beiber put on next and you might have to shave a few million off of their contract, oh friggen well. I cannot even put forth the effort to squeeze out a tear on that one or to pull out the small violin.

    Oh, and the best way to combat piracy is to make your products reasonable. I go to redbox all the time for a dollar, and I could download those movies. I watch crap from people on the internet all the time and I do not care if a commercial runs. I even know that internet producers rely on the ad running so they can make their little bit of money so I even disable my ad blockers because those people are squeezing out a living, not trying to squeeze out a mansion for themselves, their agents, and every retarded crotch dropping that comes out of a media executive. If i cannot download i am not going to a movie theater to watch your pile of crap. I am also not going back to cable if you stop downloading. I will just stop watching anything by major media if they stop offering it online, or wait for the DVDs to go on sale in 5 years for 5 dollars or less.

    greedy bastards. This is why I stopped caring about any piracy of their products. At first i used to gicve a **** and think it was wrong, but they are a bunch of evil little craps who want to screw all of our computers up with poorly written viruses I know are going to hit people who are not pirating. They forced cable without competition. They charge you 12 dollars for a ticket to see their mass produced ****ty movie. Then we have them pushing crap on us like twilight and beibermania. They get no pity from me, and i hope all their **** is pirated. It doesn't matter because I still am not watching loui anderson dive into a pool and call that entertainment. If i wanted to watch a fat guy do a belly flop I could go to any municipal pool in the US and I am sure there is one there. You have a show about New jersey? I used to live on the border. I avoided it when i lived there, why would I want to watch a show about it? If I want to see real housewives or honey boo boo I have walmart. If they are not at the first one i can drive another 2 miles and they will be at the second one.

    Oh and:


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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits,

    Quote Originally Posted by AliHajiSheik View Post
    At least you admit that there are laws and you begrudgingly admit they are being broken.

    At least you are consistent in your belief that the public only has to want something in order to justify talking it. Price too high on a Rolls Royce? No problem, just take one for a test drive and don't return it. If the law says you can't? No problem, it is Draconian anyway. Steel away!

    A right not defended is lost. I don't agree with this tactic, but I do agree with their right. If they want to charge $1000 for a movie or song, then that too is their right. As long as I am not forced to buy it.
    It is not about price.. it is about access. If I lived in the US, I would have zero reason what so ever to pirate TV-series or even music or movies (DVDs). Oh I missed the last Big Bang Theory.. no problem, I can see it for free or very cheap online!

    But because I choose to live outside the US, then I am not allowed to have Netflix type service, Hulu or similar, and my Tv stations takes weeks or months or even years to show my favorite TV show.

    Now Netflix has come to certain European countries, but even then the content is years out of date and you only have access to stuff that has already been shown on local tv at some point in time. But most of Europe does not even have Netflix or similar services, and those that there are.. their content is years if not decades old. Why? There are plenty of companies who have tried... because the rights holders refuse to allow it. Spotify for example had a tough time getting into the US or even some European countries... why? Because the same rights holders that allowed it in some countries, refused it in others... wtf?

    So frankly, the rights holders are bringing piracy on themselves by limiting access not only on price (not a major factor) but on nationality or region.. and that is living in the 1980s and not in the Internet world of the 21st century.

    The rights holders could squash a lot of piracy by letting content online after it is aired in the US... at a price. I would be willing to pay 10 bucks a month to get access to my favorite CBS shows. But I cant. So I pirate them because I dont want to wait the weeks/months/years for it to come on local tv channels...

    And then there is DVDs...the most idiotic thing ever. Not only cant you get new movies online, you have to buy a DVD, but the morons at the movie companies actually believe there are borders on the Internet, so they release DVDs in say Russia long before everywhere else... even before they are in the cinema in many countries, and then they are shocked that the movie is being pirated online? Morons.
    PeteEU

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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits,

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    It is not about price.. it is about access. If I lived in the US, I would have zero reason what so ever to pirate TV-series or even music or movies (DVDs). Oh I missed the last Big Bang Theory.. no problem, I can see it for free or very cheap online!

    But because I choose to live outside the US, then I am not allowed to have Netflix type service, Hulu or similar, and my Tv stations takes weeks or months or even years to show my favorite TV show.

    Now Netflix has come to certain European countries, but even then the content is years out of date and you only have access to stuff that has already been shown on local tv at some point in time. But most of Europe does not even have Netflix or similar services, and those that there are.. their content is years if not decades old. Why? There are plenty of companies who have tried... because the rights holders refuse to allow it. Spotify for example had a tough time getting into the US or even some European countries... why? Because the same rights holders that allowed it in some countries, refused it in others... wtf?

    So frankly, the rights holders are bringing piracy on themselves by limiting access not only on price (not a major factor) but on nationality or region.. and that is living in the 1980s and not in the Internet world of the 21st century.

    The rights holders could squash a lot of piracy by letting content online after it is aired in the US... at a price. I would be willing to pay 10 bucks a month to get access to my favorite CBS shows. But I cant. So I pirate them because I dont want to wait the weeks/months/years for it to come on local tv channels...

    And then there is DVDs...the most idiotic thing ever. Not only cant you get new movies online, you have to buy a DVD, but the morons at the movie companies actually believe there are borders on the Internet, so they release DVDs in say Russia long before everywhere else... even before they are in the cinema in many countries, and then they are shocked that the movie is being pirated online? Morons.
    Poor Pete, some companies don't want to do business in his area so he condones theft rather than looking at why a company would not want to do business in his area. Let's see if I have this correct: They have it, I want it, they're stupid. I wouldn't rule that out as a possibility, but why would they not want to sell to your area? Could it be that they don't agree with the regulation in your marketplace?

    You say that rights holders are bringing piracy upon themselves. They could eliminate piracy completely if they just put out their content for free in geographically distributed data centers. That's the logical extension of your argument.

    Here is an alternative point of view: Content owners either can't or won't abide by local regulation to sell legitimately in your area, but these same government entities are obligated to enforce copyright laws and don't so you can freely pirate whatever you want to have. So you say you want to be honest but just can't because THEY are morons. At least you are honest in your law breaking.

    As I indicated, I don't agree with all the tactics that the entertainment industry uses, but I understand why they try.

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    Re: US entertainment industry to Congress: make it legal for us to deploy rootkits,

    The parts of the article in the boxes, that I assume are quotes from the report are scary.

    like this:
    If an unauthorized person accesses the information, a range of actions might then occur. For example, the file could be rendered inaccessible and the unauthorized user’s computer could be locked down
    So they are proposing as an "example" allowing businesses to lock down someones personal property, thwarting access to potentially vital personal records, information, and data, cutting off avenues of communication, blocking easy access to things such as bank accounts, disallowing someone to shop online, as well as a myriad of other intrusions and inconveniences into unrelated activities? All of this without any sort of due process, or judicial/legal intervention? Allowing a private entity the power and the ability to lock someone out of their property, their records, their machinery should in no way be allowed, hell I am dubious about giving the government this power, yet alone putting into the hands of private enterprises.

    And then 2 sentences later we have this:

    Such measures do not violate existing laws on the use of the Internet
    In that case it is time to make some laws that do prevent this. Someones access to and use of their personal computer should in no way be allowed to be potentially threatened by private companies, I do not care what it is you do on your computer. The only way that this should be even remotely allowed to occur is within the bounds of our judicial system - and this does not mean some all encompassing decree of some sort that allows third parties to get away with this nonsense, this should only occur on an individual case by case basis and with the proper warrants.

    Not just no but, HELL NO. There is absolutely no way that that kind of power, or those abilities should be allowed for anything, or anyone in the private sector. It is like allowing a grocery store to lock down your refrigerator because you stole a gallon of milk. Sounds kind of ridiculous does it not? While it may be an extreme example, it is not really different from this proposal. Imagine if there were anti-theft devices on items on the shelf in the grocery store, and if you brought them home without them being deactivated upon purchase they sent a signal to an electronic lock on your fridge preventing you from accessing its contents. Would you be ok with this?

    Having said that even IF they somehow pulled of this draconian plan it wold get circumvented, it might end up being an inconvenience to some, but the same people who are able to crack other forms of DRM would also be able to neutralize these little "computer bombs". Those who pirate then would not have this malicious bit of code on their machines, it would be the ones who have the game legitimately who would have these little "presents" hiding out in their systems. It would backfire, people would not trust the legitimate versions and would be more prone to attain a "clean" version through other channels.
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