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Thread: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

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    DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    DALLAS – A DNA test on a single hair has cast doubt on the guilt of a Texas man who was put to death 10 years ago for a liquor-store murder — an execution that went forward after then-Gov. George W. Bush's staff failed to tell him the condemned man was asking for genetic analysis of the strand.


    The hair had been the only piece of physical evidence linking Claude Jones to the crime scene. But the recently completed DNA analysis found it did not belong to Jones and instead may have come from the murder victim.
    Here we go again. Another day, and another innocent man found to have been murdered by the State of Texas, and another day that my stance against the death penalty is affirmed.

    I know, I know, I created a thread in which I expressed my pleasure that the home invader in Connecticut was given the death penalty for torturing and murdering a mother and her two kids, and so this thread makes me seem hypocritical, doesn't it? No, it doesn't. I can be happy that a monster is going to be toasted, and still be against the death penalty. Monsters deserve death, but innocent people do not. It is pretty plain and simple. Given a choice, I would much rather see the Connecticut monster spend life in prison instead of seeing innocent people murdered by the State of Texas. It is an issue of morality with me, and it is not moral to murder innocent people, even if the State sanctions it.

    In regard to Bush, he was not given the information he needed that could have pardoned this innocent man. This is in stark contrast to Rick Perry, who put an innocent man to death for arson, when he knew that there was a possibility he could have been innocent, and then fired every member of the State Forensics Board and replaced them with political cronies, who then quashed the investigation, in order to cover it up. But, you know, it doesn't matter. If you support the death penalty, and are the man at the top, who oversees it's implementation, then you have blood on your hands. And so does every citizen who supports the death penalty. They have blood on their hands too. Since so many people argue the Biblical idea of "an eye for an eye" in their support of the death penalty, then they stand convicted of murder by their own words, and if you believe in an afterlife, there will be hell to pay for those who stood by and supported the State when it murdered innocent people. Why is that? Because the Bible says so. You just can't have it both ways. Murder is murder, whether done by an atheist slimeball with a gun, or a Christian slimeball who aids and abets throwing the switch on an innocent man. Again, the Bible says so. Murder is murder, and there will be consequences in the afterlife.

    I will now put on my flameproof suit, and get ready for the flames that are about to come my way. No problem. Let the flames ensue. I stand by what I have posted, and I am sure that God backs what I have written too.

    Article is here.
    Last edited by danarhea; 11-12-10 at 01:01 AM.
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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    I think the death penalty should be used only when there is definitive proof and no gray area what so ever if even used at all. I am not a fan of the death penalty, I think a life of hard labor would be a better sentence. But I do think for states that do have the death penalty that the convicted must have certain proof of their crime.
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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    Quote Originally Posted by danarhea View Post
    Here we go again. Another day, and another innocent man found to have been murdered by the State of Texas, and another day that my stance against the death penalty is affirmed.

    I know, I know, I created a thread in which I expressed my pleasure that the home invader in Connecticut was given the death penalty for torturing and murdering a mother and her two kids, and so this thread makes me seem hypocritical, doesn't it? No, it doesn't. I can be happy that a monster is going to be toasted, and still be against the death penalty. Monsters deserve death, but innocent people do not. It is pretty plain and simple. Given a choice, I would much rather see the Connecticut monster spend life in prison instead of seeing innocent people murdered by the State of Texas. It is an issue of morality with me, and it is not moral to murder innocent people, even if the State sanctions it.

    In regard to Bush, he was not given the information he needed that could have pardoned this innocent man. This is in stark contrast to Rick Perry, who put an innocent man to death for arson, when he knew that there was a possibility he could have been innocent, and then fired every member of the State Forensics Board and replaced them with political cronies, who then quashed the investigation, in order to cover it up. But, you know, it doesn't matter. If you support the death penalty, and are the man at the top, who oversees it's implementation, then you have blood on your hands. And so does every citizen who supports the death penalty. They have blood on their hands too. Since so many people argue the Biblical idea of "an eye for an eye" in their support of the death penalty, then they stand convicted of murder by their own words, and if you believe in an afterlife, there will be hell to pay for those who stood by and supported the State when it murdered innocent people. Why is that? Because the Bible says so. You just can't have it both ways. Murder is murder, whether done by an atheist slimeball with a gun, or a Christian slimeball who aids and abets throwing the switch on an innocent man. Again, the Bible says so. Murder is murder, and there will be consequences in the afterlife.

    I will now put on my flameproof suit, and get ready for the flames that are about to come my way. No problem. Let the flames ensue. I stand by what I have posted, and I am sure that God backs what I have written too.

    Article is here.
    But but we all know that Texas is so freaking perfect .... never ever breaks basic human rights or the law in its never ending goal of executing as many people as possible..








    yes that was ironic.

    Just another case of many I suspect that are out there. No one tries to help the already executed after all..
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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    As long as there is a possibility that even ONE innocent person could be wrongly executed, I will remain firmly against the death penalty. You can always compensate someone for wrongful imprisonment, but you can't bring them back to life when the justice system ****ed up again.
    "Yes, but are you a Protestant atheist or a Catholic atheist?".- Northern Irish joke

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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    I'm against the death penalty because it sets a bad example. It justifies the rationalization of murder.

    That's all. Just a poor example of how people should behave. If the government can target a demonstratably harmless (locked up, alone if necessary) and helpless (housed, fed and controlled by the state directly) person for a good enough reason, I believe it inclines the citizenry to such.

    Counter to popular claim, capital punishment actually encourages murder via practical demonstration of targetting the harmless and helpless.

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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    Quote Originally Posted by ecofarm View Post
    I'm against the death penalty because it sets a bad example. It justifies the rationalization of murder.

    That's all. Just a poor example of how people should behave. If the government can target a demonstratably harmless (locked up, alone if necessary) and helpless (housed, fed and controlled by the state directly) person for a good enough reason, I believe it inclines the citizenry to such.

    Counter to popular claim, capital punishment actually encourages murder via practical demonstration of targetting the harmless and helpless.
    I've often had similar thoughts. It always strikes me how societies where the death penalty is still legal seem to be more violent and have more violent crime in general than those where it's been abolished.
    "Yes, but are you a Protestant atheist or a Catholic atheist?".- Northern Irish joke

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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    Last I checked, those stats don't hold up (given different context, actual raw numbers in some cases, etc); however, the logic does.
    Last edited by ecofarm; 11-12-10 at 07:44 AM.

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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    Everyone's guilty of something.

    Set stricter proof requirements and move on.

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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    Quote Originally Posted by Arcana XV View Post
    I've often had similar thoughts. It always strikes me how societies where the death penalty is still legal seem to be more violent and have more violent crime in general than those where it's been abolished.
    Using such simplistic logic as that, we can find that since Canada abolished the death penalty in 76, their violent crime rates have increased. Obviously, abolishing the death penalty results in more violence.

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    Re: DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

    Quote Originally Posted by danarhea View Post
    Here we go again. Another day, and another innocent man found to have been murdered by the State of Texas, and another day that my stance against the death penalty is affirmed.

    I know, I know, I created a thread in which I expressed my pleasure that the home invader in Connecticut was given the death penalty for torturing and murdering a mother and her two kids, and so this thread makes me seem hypocritical, doesn't it? No, it doesn't. I can be happy that a monster is going to be toasted, and still be against the death penalty. Monsters deserve death, but innocent people do not. It is pretty plain and simple. Given a choice, I would much rather see the Connecticut monster spend life in prison instead of seeing innocent people murdered by the State of Texas. It is an issue of morality with me, and it is not moral to murder innocent people, even if the State sanctions it. I will now put on my flameproof suit, and get ready for the flames that are about to come my way. No problem. Let the flames ensue. I stand by what I have posted, and I am sure that God backs what I have written too.
    You can't have it both ways just because you say so. You either support the death penalty or you don't. "I only support it if you're guilty" is full-on support. Why can't you just say, "This case makes me rethink my position on the death penalty?" That would be honest. Your post is hypocritical.

    If you're correct that God has special punishments awaiting those who support the death penalty, then you do need that flameproof suit just as surely as the rest.
    The devil whispered in my ear, "You cannot withstand the storm." I whispered back, "I am ​the storm."

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