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Thread: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Le Marteau

    In regards to your first point, I'll make the singular statement that a document that partially outlines your system of government, as worthy as it may be, even if it's still in use, does not denote the end of the maturing period for your civilisation.
    It's actually a great deal more than a piece of paper, it attempts to guarantee human rights and freedoms and has done quite a good job.. American history compares very favorably with any European, Asian, African or South American countries. If you can name more 'mature' nations that can compare with that of the United States I'd appreciate hearing what they might be.

    At any rate, I'd hope that you think the US is still maturing, because it's a ****ty place for your evolution to have stopped, if it indeed has at the present day.
    What makes you think that? People from all over the world are still trying to live there.

    For the second point -- well that's certainly the trick, isn't it? I'm not claiming to have the perfect solution to the problem you've named, but I am saying that we must work to find one, as no nation should be exempt from investigation into international law.
    It seems there are other nations far more deserving of inspection than the United States. I think we can both name a few.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Awesome.

    An international organization full of dictators and diplomats, who do not represent their own people, get to excuse their oppressions and bad behaviors over a celebration of America's imperfections. And it really doesn't matter how slight those imperfections are or how insignificant they are compared to the whole of our identity. Is it possible that the greatest force for good over the last 200 years have made mistakes along the way? Is it possible that we have built the last standing "empire" with not only moral high ground, but also a little shadow activity? Has the entire free world been saved from Barbary Pirates, Spaniards, Japanese, Germans and Russians with only good manners? Nobody should really worry about this. Any one of our stumbles can be multiplied over and over for everybody else across the oceans. In the end, we outshine even our closest allies. Of course, our allies and enemies will take great pleasure in exaggerating anything they can for the sake of their own decrepit (very recent) histories.

    With America being the muscle for the UN since the Korean War and the Soviet Union (light) and China being Security members, who gives a damn about what the UN thinks.
    Last edited by MSgt; 11-14-10 at 04:21 PM.

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  3. #153
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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Quote Originally Posted by Grant View Post
    Until quite recently I thought the left was in favor of the separation between Church and State.

    What was it that convinced them otherwise, I wonder?

    The stoning of Gays and adulterers? Multiple wives and marrying children?

    Would one of you lefties out there please explain this turnabout?
    It's really the separation of Christianity and State.
    "He who does not think himself worth saving from poverty and ignorance by his own efforts, will hardly be thought worth the efforts of anybody else." -- Frederick Douglass, Self-Made Men (1872)
    "Fly-over" country voted, and The Donald is now POTUS.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Quote Originally Posted by American View Post
    It's really the separation of Christianity and State.
    An excellent insight!

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetboogieman View Post
    Who said I didn't support some of those things.

    Obamacare as you aptly name it, has been so misinterpreted and so many blatant lies made about it, I can't even tell whats fact, and made up right wing rhetoric. So thanks for that.

    All I have to say is, in certain aspects.

    If you can find money to kill people apdst. Then you can find money to help people.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Duplicate post
    Last edited by j-mac; 11-15-10 at 08:30 AM.
    Americans are so enamored of equality that they would rather be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Duplicate post
    Last edited by j-mac; 11-15-10 at 08:30 AM.
    Americans are so enamored of equality that they would rather be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    j-mac


    Yep, Canadian health care sounds just great.
    Unless you know better.

    It was better before the government got involved and I suspect it was better before the HMO's and Medicare became big in the States. Whatever comes between doctors and patients is not good, and we know prices are going to go crazy when they do. Where Canadians can go to get proper medical treatment once the the US changes their system is causing a bit of a dilemma for Canadians.

    Medical tourism is becoming big business in Central America though, where I am right now, so at least there are still areas of free enterprise, as well as agreements directly between doctor and patient.
    Last edited by Grant; 11-15-10 at 08:41 AM.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Something willm always come between doctors and patients, even if it is just money. The patient who can't afford care, won't get it under any system. It's a false argument to suggest that the only way someone is between the patient and the doctor is with government involvement. For the patient who can't afford care, that intervention seems pretty damn good.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

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    Re: U.S. offers its human rights record for U.N. review

    Quote Originally Posted by j-mac View Post
    Yep, Canadian health care sounds just great.
    Right, and patients here in the US aren't at times denied life-saving treatment simply because the health insurer decides it's less expensive to delay in court and let the patient die rather than pay for care.
    I'm already gearing up for Finger Vote 2014.

    Just for reference, means my post was a giant steaming pile of sarcasm.

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