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Thread: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

  1. #11
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    When it first came up, it was a good policy because eye for an eye was originally instituted to curtail punishment given to a criminal. However, we're now even further from that point now and eye for and eye is a very simplistic and at times barbaric practice. Base everything on the rights and liberties of the indivudal and you'll be much better off for it.
    Yep. As humanity evolved our laws and punishments should have evolved as well. Sadly this type of punishment is still around.

  2. #12
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by liblady View Post
    this is unbelievable.
    Any country that values human rights should condemn any measures taken in that direction.

    we need to become oil independent.
    Unfortunately, the lessons of the 1973, 1979, and 2008 energy crises (energy price spikes), were quickly forgotten once the price of crude oil fell. Aggressive rhetoric notwithstanding, substantive energy policy (goals, research spending, incentives, etc.) reveals almost no conviction whatsoever to reduce oil dependency, even as that dependency entails significant geopolitical and economic risk. The words advocating and professing political commitment to alternative energy or, in today's parlance, "green energy," don't impress me at all. Concrete and sustained action is the criteria by which the nation's energy policy should properly be judged. Unfortunately, once one looks at the policy front, very little has changed. Moreover, little is likely to change in the near-term. If one examines pre-2008 federal budgets and post-2008 federal budgets as proxies for commitment, there has been no dramatic shift on energy policy. There has been no substantial reorientation of spending to suggest a credible commitment to dramatic change, much less any sense of urgency.

    In the end, the only thing that has materially changed is that the gap between today's rhetoric and ongoing policy has widened, as rhetoric has shifted even more strongly toward alternative energy while policy has budged very little. To borrow from academic research on "organizational energy," when one combines positive rhetoric with policy inertia, the result is a stance that can reasonably be described as "comfort" or "complacency." IMO, that very well sums up today's energy policy. Worse, there has been enormous continuity in such policy since the very first energy crisis, even as the world has changed markedly and geopolitical vulnerability has increased given the location of remaining proved oil reserves.

    As a result, if or when a new energy crises hits, the political response will almost certainly be little different than it was in 2008, almost 35 years after the first great energy price shock: Political leaders will plead for understanding. They will argue that the crisis was unavoidable and assert that there is little that can be done. The great tragedy will be that such a crisis will likely have been avoidable and many more options would have been available to transform what would be a crisis into a manageable situation had policy makers chosen a course aimed at reducing such dependency.

  3. #13
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by jujuman13 View Post
    Why ever not, after all the US Military regularly doles out cruel and unusual punishment to their prisoners.
    I hope you can see a difference between a judge in civilian court and the US military. And even then, we're under lots of rules for POWs and supposed to control what they can do with those they label as not POW. Not that we're that successful at it.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Aa'lah * Peace be upon Him *, this law is just.
    "Sodomy is one of the most gruesome and detested crimes, the punishment for which is also one of the harshest penalties, it is the capital punishment"
    -Imam Mukhtar K. Ahmed Al-Mesalati, author of the "QURAN And Same-Sex Behavior", c. 2009

  5. #15
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by donsutherland1 View Post
    Any country that values human rights should condemn any measures taken in that direction.



    Unfortunately, the lessons of the 1973, 1979, and 2008 energy crises (energy price spikes), were quickly forgotten once the price of crude oil fell. Aggressive rhetoric notwithstanding, substantive energy policy (goals, research spending, incentives, etc.) reveals almost no conviction whatsoever to reduce oil dependency, even as that dependency entails significant geopolitical and economic risk. The words advocating and professing political commitment to alternative energy or, in today's parlance, "green energy," don't impress me at all. Concrete and sustained action is the criteria by which the nation's energy policy should properly be judged. Unfortunately, once one looks at the policy front, very little has changed. Moreover, little is likely to change in the near-term. If one examines pre-2008 federal budgets and post-2008 federal budgets as proxies for commitment, there has been no dramatic shift on energy policy. There has been no substantial reorientation of spending to suggest a credible commitment to dramatic change, much less any sense of urgency.

    In the end, the only thing that has materially changed is that the gap between today's rhetoric and ongoing policy has widened, as rhetoric has shifted even more strongly toward alternative energy while policy has budged very little. To borrow from academic research on "organizational energy," when one combines positive rhetoric with policy inertia, the result is a stance that can reasonably be described as "comfort" or "complacency." IMO, that very well sums up today's energy policy. Worse, there has been enormous continuity in such policy since the very first energy crisis, even as the world has changed markedly and geopolitical vulnerability has increased given the location of remaining proved oil reserves.

    As a result, if or when a new energy crises hits, the political response will almost certainly be little different than it was in 2008, almost 35 years after the first great energy price shock: Political leaders will plead for understanding. They will argue that the crisis was unavoidable and assert that there is little that can be done. The great tragedy will be that such a crisis will likely have been avoidable and many more options would have been available to transform what would be a crisis into a manageable situation had policy makers chosen a course aimed at reducing such dependency.
    why do you think this is the case? oil and gov't DO mix? does the world economy depend on the u.s. oil consumption?

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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by liblady View Post
    why do you think this is the case? oil and gov't DO mix? does the world economy depend on the u.s. oil consumption?
    IMO, human nature probably greatly shapes that outcome. Frequently, once a crisis has passed, its lessons are forgotten. Complacency sets in and optimism about the future overwhelms calculations to the extent that the risk of a future crisis is greatly discounted. Of course, those with vested interests in the status quo seek to preserve the status quo and in a democratic society they have and ought to have a voice. That, too, helps tilt the balance toward inertia.

    Hence, in terms of planned big changes, the greatest prospect for such change is usually present the combination of prolonged crises when solutions must be developed out of necessity and when there is the strong, visionary, and committed leadership necessary to align support behind a big change. The Manhattan Project (WW II and Franklin Roosevelt) and Apollo Project (Cold War/Sputnik and John Kennedy) were initiated when both elements were present. Both projects were extremely ambitious (scope, timelines, and need to invent/create new technologies). Both were achieved in remarkably short periods of time. In the cases of the 1973, 1979, and 2008 energy crises, both crises passed relatively quickly.

    Needless to say, even without the invention of new technologies or development of viable alternatives, much more significant progress than what has occurred is possible and over a relatively short period of time. For example, in 2005 Portugal (much poorer economically and less technologically advanced than the U.S.) made an aggressive commitment to transition away from fossil fuels in powering its electrical grid. Then, 17% of its electricity was produced from renewable energy. Today, that share has risen to 45%.

  7. #17
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    In all fairness, what percent of people in the US do you think would be okay with sentencing a child molester to be put in a cell with someone who would rape him?

    60%? 70%?
    People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    In the US we would be paying 50K a year for a variable amount of years--about a decade, I would think--so that this meat cleaver wielder can have a 'proper' punishment. I can't deny the cheap "well, we will just break your back" alternative has it's perks. Think of how many children you can save from a life of crime with close to--minus the cost of the surgery--half a million dollars.
    Last edited by Areopagitican; 08-19-10 at 05:32 PM.

  9. #19
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by RightinNYC View Post
    In all fairness, what percent of people in the US do you think would be okay with sentencing a child molester to be put in a cell with someone who would rape him?

    60%? 70%?
    Far more than that. How many people do you know that are honestly even a little bit concerned about prison rape?

  10. #20
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    Re: Report: Saudi judge considers paralysis punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by liblady View Post
    i can argue that it's barbaric though. and sick.
    It can also be argued that caring for, and protecting the rights of criminals is barbaric and sick. A man is paralyzed for life, yet the attacker walks.

    Not everyone shares your, world view.
    Climate, changes. It takes a particularly uneducated population to buy into the idea that it's their fault climate is changing and further political solutions can fix it.



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