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Thread: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convictions

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by ric27 View Post
    Be careful when you see someone freed because of new testing. If true, glad it happened, but the press would much rather report that than the 1000's successfully convicted with good evidence
    What you are failing to understand about my position is that I don't want a single solitary person to be wrongfully executed, whatever the reason may be.

    Until we can achieve that, capital punishment is inherently unjust because of the risk of a wrongful execution.
    I'm already gearing up for Finger Vote 2014.

    Just for reference, means my post was a giant steaming pile of sarcasm.

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Tammerlain View Post
    Ok it is retribution

    Now what if the wrong person was executee? Who should that persons family seek retribution on, the lawyers the judge and the jury, should they all be killed for murder (killing an innocent person is murder)
    We are sorry and give them money

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by ric27 View Post
    We are sorry and give them money
    Not if someone is dead, the people responsible should be executed as well
    Happy Hanukkah Cheerfull Kwanzaa
    Happy Christmas Merry New Year Festivus for the rest of us

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by TacticalEvilDan View Post
    What you are failing to understand about my position is that I don't want a single solitary person to be wrongfully executed, whatever the reason may be.

    Until we can achieve that, capital punishment is inherently unjust because of the risk of a wrongful execution.
    Achieve what? Rather than fix the real problem, we'll just cancel the death penalty, and sweep the real problem under the rug - who cares if people sit in prison for 20 years on a bad conviction?

    Even if you changed the death penalty to life in prison, it's still a problem. The problem IS with the administration of justice in the court system, not the administration of the death penalty.

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Well, I'm new here on the forums, and not sure this is the best way to start this out, but I'm going to go for it. forgive the length of the post. Several years ago, a friend of mine, who is a police officer, was involved in a case involving the murder of a little girl by the boyfriend of the child's mother. He was caught, confessed, and was sentenced to life in prison for the crime. My friend, is in an area without the death penalty, and not a huge supporter of it, but having seen the child's body, and being involved so closely in the case, he was very torn on the subject. I, being the opinionated wench that I am, am not torn on the subject. I am going to just copy and paste the letter I wrote to him about it. It kinda sums up my thoughts. Forgive me for not rewriting it into a more proper reply, but this seemed easiest, and I am also a lazy wench.

    I'm glad the man who did this to her will pay for his crime. I know there is nothing that could be done to him (even what you would like to do to him) which will bring this child back, nor that will possibly be enough to make up for what he did. Can a lifetime in prison make up for it? Of course it cant. Can killing him (as is what would most likely happen here) make up for it? No, that wont do it either. An eye for an eye, or a life for a life, is easy to say, but in the end it accomplishes little, and lessens all of us. You know I dont believe in life after death, so I dont believe in any kind of judgement after death, nor do I believe people will pay for their sins, or be rewarded for their good, after they pass, so justice, such as it is, must be eked out in this life, or it never will be. If society were to decide to deal the ultimate penalty upon those who kill, is justice served? The suffering, current and future, of the murderer is over. Death can be a relief to one who is racked with guilt. And when it comes to one who does not feel guilt, can they feel anything? Even a fear of death? The death penalty is not about justice, it is about revenge. Now, bear in mind, I do not necessarily consider this a bad thing. Revenge can be noble in its own way. But it needs to be done right, and for the right reasons if it is to be done. Society cannot seek vengeance for her. It would be a cold and empty sort of revenge. Society felt for her, some may have cried for her as I did, and as I am sure you did. But I did not nurse her, I did not spend sleepless nights next to her bed when she was sick, I did not watch her as she grew, I did not have dreams of her growing up, marrying, and living a happy life. The right of revenge, if such a thing exists, belongs to the one or the ones who did all those things. Am I advocating handing the mother the weapon of her choice, and letting her do as she will with the killer? In a sense, yes, I am. Do I think this is civilized, or a good thing? No, not really, but at least it would be honest, and real. If someone killed one of my children, could I end their life? Could I draw their blood, and gain some sense of closure from it? Well, initially, if I were there at the moment it happened, I have no doubt I could. With the scene there in front of me, rage, and sorrow would probably allow me to do things to another that I cannot even imagine of as I sit here and type right now. But later, in the sterile setting of a court room, or a police station, I cant say what I might be able to do. But it should be MY choice. The dead are no longer here to speak for what they would wish. Those who were closest to them should have the say in what happens. The cold and impersonal rituals of an execution chamber are not a fitting revenge, nor are they justice. The only one who has the right to pull that switch is the one who was hurt the most by the one sitting in the chair. If they wish it, they should be the one to do it. If they do not wish it, no other person should be allowed, or made to do it. Some things are simply too personal to be handled by beaurocracy.
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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by TacticalEvilDan View Post
    The Innocence Project has freed enough wrongfully convicted men to convince me that we're not sharp enough to make capital punishment worth the risk.

    Given how many have been freed, it makes me wonder how many who are still on death row who are innocent and simply can't prove it.
    Anita Alvarez turns up the heat in her battle with Northwesterns David Protess and his Medill Innocence Project - Chicago magazine - February 2010 - Chicago

    Food for thought sir. The IP may have noble goals, but it's also got it's share of... doubt.
    Climate, changes. It takes a particularly uneducated population to buy into the idea that it's their fault climate is changing and further political solutions can fix it.



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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by opinion8tdwench View Post
    Well, I'm new here on the forums, and not sure this is the best way to start this out, but I'm going to go for it. forgive the length of the post. Several years ago, a friend of mine, who is a police officer, was involved in a case involving the murder of a little girl by the boyfriend of the child's mother. He was caught, confessed, and was sentenced to life in prison for the crime. My friend, is in an area without the death penalty, and not a huge supporter of it, but having seen the child's body, and being involved so closely in the case, he was very torn on the subject. I, being the opinionated wench that I am, am not torn on the subject. I am going to just copy and paste the letter I wrote to him about it. It kinda sums up my thoughts. Forgive me for not rewriting it into a more proper reply, but this seemed easiest, and I am also a lazy wench.

    I'm glad the man who did this to her will pay for his crime. I know there is nothing that could be done to him (even what you would like to do to him) which will bring this child back, nor that will possibly be enough to make up for what he did. Can a lifetime in prison make up for it? Of course it cant. Can killing him (as is what would most likely happen here) make up for it? No, that wont do it either. An eye for an eye, or a life for a life, is easy to say, but in the end it accomplishes little, and lessens all of us. You know I dont believe in life after death, so I dont believe in any kind of judgement after death, nor do I believe people will pay for their sins, or be rewarded for their good, after they pass, so justice, such as it is, must be eked out in this life, or it never will be. If society were to decide to deal the ultimate penalty upon those who kill, is justice served? The suffering, current and future, of the murderer is over. Death can be a relief to one who is racked with guilt. And when it comes to one who does not feel guilt, can they feel anything? Even a fear of death? The death penalty is not about justice, it is about revenge. Now, bear in mind, I do not necessarily consider this a bad thing. Revenge can be noble in its own way. But it needs to be done right, and for the right reasons if it is to be done. Society cannot seek vengeance for her. It would be a cold and empty sort of revenge. Society felt for her, some may have cried for her as I did, and as I am sure you did. But I did not nurse her, I did not spend sleepless nights next to her bed when she was sick, I did not watch her as she grew, I did not have dreams of her growing up, marrying, and living a happy life. The right of revenge, if such a thing exists, belongs to the one or the ones who did all those things. Am I advocating handing the mother the weapon of her choice, and letting her do as she will with the killer? In a sense, yes, I am. Do I think this is civilized, or a good thing? No, not really, but at least it would be honest, and real. If someone killed one of my children, could I end their life? Could I draw their blood, and gain some sense of closure from it? Well, initially, if I were there at the moment it happened, I have no doubt I could. With the scene there in front of me, rage, and sorrow would probably allow me to do things to another that I cannot even imagine of as I sit here and type right now. But later, in the sterile setting of a court room, or a police station, I cant say what I might be able to do. But it should be MY choice. The dead are no longer here to speak for what they would wish. Those who were closest to them should have the say in what happens. The cold and impersonal rituals of an execution chamber are not a fitting revenge, nor are they justice. The only one who has the right to pull that switch is the one who was hurt the most by the one sitting in the chair. If they wish it, they should be the one to do it. If they do not wish it, no other person should be allowed, or made to do it. Some things are simply too personal to be handled by beaurocracy.
    I agree with what you said for the most part. If someone killed someone or harmed them in some other way (rape, torture etc.) I would probably want to skin them alive, and this isn't just figure of speech. Usually, I'm not crazy about the site of blood or serious injuries but in certain circumstances I'm sure I could handle it. Some people disgust me. Rapists and murderers should endure extreme pain before given the release of death.

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by Rightwingnutjob View Post
    What do republicans and Nazi's have to do with this? Please grow up.
    That's right Mr. Righty!! Tow the line and kiss the ass of thyne own party!

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by texmaster View Post
    I'm not willing to throw out the death penalty because we don't have a flawless system.
    Laws had to be made at the federal level to keep your state from executing mentally retarded people. I would say this fact alone should automatically, and permenantly ban Texas from exeucting anything more dangerous than a search warrant.

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    Re: Texas Inmates Likely to Be Exonerated After Committee Discovers Wrongful Convicti

    Quote Originally Posted by ric27 View Post
    We are sorry and give them money
    You're sorry? An innocent man/woman died so a bunch barbarians could have revenge and you have the sheer, unmitigated NERVE to say "We're sorry"?

    That isn't good enough. When an innocent man is executed ... those responsible for it, judges, prosecutors, ect ... need to be executed. This will make it VERY difficult to sentence another to die. It will also provide justice to the families of those wrongfully executed persons.

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