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Thread: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by paris View Post
    Yea, because our relationship was so much better when Dubya was in power

    His name is George W. Bush.

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by PonyBoy View Post
    His name is George W. Bush.
    Now we also have a right to call our potatoes as we wish

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    America isn't the EU's friend, when you think about it.

    We're your friends though.
    Last edited by MetalGear; 03-31-10 at 11:01 AM.

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by paris View Post
    Sarkozy's party has recently lost big time in our regional elections. He is looking forward to saving face. One of the best ways to do it, is to play buddy with the most powerful man in the world, as noted in your first article. He also has a huge ego proportionally inverse to its height. On the other hand, Obama is very well appreciated here in France. I think Sarkozy would better surrender
    the above post is reality. the OP's article is a reach to paint Obama in a negative light

    given his weakened political standing at home, sarkozy NEEDS to be seen as Obama's buddy. he so wants some of that cache to rub off
    the french are much too clever to fall for it (... please don't make me eat those words come election time)
    we are negotiating about dividing a pizza and in the meantime israel is eating it
    once you're over the hill you begin to pick up speed

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Besides Sarkozy wouldn't understand why a man would want to have dinner in the most romantic city in the world....with the woman he married.

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by justabubba View Post
    the above post is reality. the OP's article is a reach to paint Obama in a negative light

    given his weakened political standing at home, sarkozy NEEDS to be seen as Obama's buddy. he so wants some of that cache to rub off
    the french are much too clever to fall for it (... please don't make me eat those words come election time)


    I don't see how anyone could argue that it's a stretch to say that Obama has alienated some of America's closest allies. Considering that he's managed to offend Britain, France, Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic, Israel, and even Japan. All in one year, and the list goes on. So who's reaching?

    Japan Cools to America as It Prepares for Obama Visit

    Within weeks, those fears started to play out. The new Japanese government said the country would withdraw from an eight-year-old mission in the Indian Ocean to refuel warships supporting American efforts in Afghanistan.

    The government also announced that it planned to revisit a 2006 agreement to relocate a Marine airfield on Okinawa to a less populated part of the island, and to move thousands of Marines from Okinawa to Guam.

    And Japanese government officials have suddenly lost their shyness about publicly sparring with American officials, as evident in a dispute in September between Japan’s ambassador to the United States, Ichiro Fujisaki, and the Pentagon.

    Japan Cools to America as It Prepares for Obama Visit

    Europe wakes from its Obama dream

    Many Europeans cheered when Barack Obama was elected president. Disdain for his predecessor ran so high that, even in Britain, pollsters found that George W. Bush was considered a greater threat to peace than Kim Jong-il and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Only Osama bin Laden outpolled him.

    But President Obama hasn't lived up to European expectations. The disillusionment is showing. French President Nicolas Sarkozy has characterized him as weak. And at a U.N. Security Council meeting on nonproliferation, Mr. Sarkozy chided Mr. Obama with the reminder that "We live in a real world, not a virtual world."

    Many Europeans, of course, still cling to the notion that Mr. Obama is "one of us." And certainly no American president has been friendlier to the political values of Europe.

    But to Europe's dismay, Mr. Obama can't find the time to attend this year's annual U.S.-European Union Summit - something Mr. Bush always managed to do. Mr. Obama's decision to skip the summit offended Europeans, who saw it as a deliberate snub of the European Union - their favorite project to centralize government and internationalize the governance of human affairs great and small. Given Mr. Obama's embrace of such ideas domestically, Europeans were understandably puzzled that he would not rush to link arms with them in the summit.

    Further souring relations was Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates' blast at much of Europe for dithering on defense. At last month's meeting of NATO officials, Mr. Gates said the "pacification of Europe" (meaning Europe's turning away from war and defense spending as necessary policies to keep the peace) was making it difficult for the allies to "operate and fight together."

    "The demilitarization of Europe," he argued, "where large swaths of the general public and political class are averse to military force and the risks that go with it, has gone from a blessing in the 20th century to an impediment to achieving real security and lasting peace in the 21st."

    Mr. Gates is absolutely right, but put that aside for a moment. The in-your-face nature of his words is striking. No Bush administration official - not even Donald Rumsfeld - ever publicly criticized Europe's lack of military spending and support for NATO so bluntly. Europeans hammered Mr. Rumsfeld merely for suggesting there was a "new" and "old" Europe. Now we have a secretary of defense arguing that European fecklessness threatens world peace.

    It is one thing to start a quarrel with France or even the EU, but Mr. Obama has managed even to offend the British. Many commentators in the UK now accuse Mr. Obama of harboring anti-British sentiments. The State Department's recent announcement that we would remain neutral in the Falklands Islands dispute between the UK and Argentina has only fueled that perception.

    Daniel Hannan, a British member of the European Parliament and former fan of Mr. Obama's, put it this way in the London Telegraph: "Look, Mr. President, I was one of the few conservatives who truly wanted you to succeed. I didn't mind the way you snubbed our PM: I mean, most of us feel the same way about him. I didn't mind about the mildly anti-British passages in your book, or the boxed set of DVDs or the returning of the bust of [Winston] Churchill. But this is different. This is serious. How would you feel if, the next time you found yourself at war with some tyrant, we were simply to issue a terse statement saying 'our position remains one of neutrality'?"

    Mr. Hannan's growing concern over Mr. Obama's policies is shared by many on the opposite side of the European political spectrum. With regard to the Obama presidency, illusions are shattering across Europe. There, as here, the left's exaggerated hatred of Mr. Bush was matched only by their naive embrace of Mr. Obama. They now increasingly realize that although Mr. Obama may admire Europe's domestic polices on health care and energy, he has little practical use for the European Union's pretensions to world influence and leadership.

    But he does seem willing to give them precisely what they've requested for years: A diminished U.S. role in the world. Mr. Obama is pulling back on the projection of American power. Leaving the Europeans to their own devices (and ignoring their summits) is merely part of that program.

    Their confusion is understandable. They expected that waning American power would mean less criticism from Washington and more European influence over U.S. policy. It didn't work out that way. Instead, administration officials are blasting European security policies in language that would make even Mr. Rumsfeld blush. On top of that, Mr. Obama was not even able to save Europe's favorite international agenda item - the climate change treaty in Copenhagen.

    Europe may never get over its disdain for Mr. Bush. But they may someday come to realize that things were not as bad under Mr. Bush as they thought. At least he showed up to their meetings.

    HOLMES: Europe wakes from its Obama dream - Washington Times
    And:

    The Trans-Atlantic Frenemies


    By Gregor Peter Schmitz and Gabor Steingart in Washington

    Barack Obama is only passing through Germany on his trip to Europe later this week and does not plan to hold substantial talks with Angela Merkel. The White House views the chancellor as difficult and Germany is increasingly being left out of the loop.


    The most meaningful gifts given between world leaders aren't bouquets or porcelain tea services, but rather the flattery they extend to each other. And the American president has showered the German chancellor with a number of highly valued niceties.

    Indeed, when the president described her approach to political problems as being not only "smart," but also "one of a kind," the chancellor beamed like it was Christmas morning.

    There's just one problem with the flattery: The man doing the talking was George W. Bush. But these days, in the Washington of Barack Obama, an entirely different tone is adopted when talking about German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

    They consider the German chancellor to be difficult in her personal manner. Her policies they see as hesitant. And when it comes to economic matters -- particularly after the experience in battling the financial crisis -- they don't feel she has much expertise.

    Rude and Impolitic

    The label "difficult" is attributable to Merkel's refusal to allow then-presidential candidate Obama to hold a speech at the Brandenburg Gate last summer. They also found it rude and impolitic when she didn't accept an invitation to meet with the newly elected president at the White House in April, despite that fact that both sides had been able to find time in their schedules for a meeting.


    The Trans-Atlantic Frenemies

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama sits down this week with German Chancellor Angela Merkel under a cloud of disagreement over the way out of the global financial crisis and Germany's role in the U.S.-led Afghan war.

    AP: Obama, Merkel Set To Meet "Under Cloud Of Disagreement"

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Funny that. The only people who think he offended the above list are Americans.....

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by Alvin T. Grey View Post
    Funny that. The only people who think he offended the above list are Americans.....
    Well I think UK has fell out of love with Obama.

    UK special relationship with US is over, say MPs | Politics | guardian.co.uk

    MPs are advising to now avoid using 'special relationship' in regards to US.

    I am finding this hilarious watching Obama stumble around seemingly annoying many allies and trying to make friends with enemies.
    Last edited by Laila; 03-31-10 at 12:16 PM.


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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by Laila View Post
    Well I think UK has fell out of love with Obama.

    UK special relationship with US is over, say MPs | Politics | guardian.co.uk

    MPs are advising to now avoid using 'special relationship' in regards to US.

    I am finding this hilarious watching Obama stumble around seemingly annoying many allies and trying to make friends with enemies.
    It's sad that's what it is.

    I hope Obama will learn from his mistakes and maybe replace some of his advisors. Although the feeling of disappointment is perhaps natural since expectations for this president were so high, but still he has offended many friendly countries and he will need their help in the coming years to solve some of the world's urgent problems.

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    Re: Sarkozy's chilly visit to America

    Quote Originally Posted by PonyBoy View Post
    Well if there's one country that Obama has alienated it's Britain. Soon after Obama was elected, One of the first things he did was taking down all the Winston Churchill pictures.
    This is not altogether surprising. Obama's Kenyan connections would probably dictate that he does not see Churchill with the same rosy hue of nostalgia that previous residents of the White House would have done. Churchill was British PM at the beginning of the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya where the British killed around 20,000 people protesting and rebelling in order to win their independence from the Empire. Perhaps members of Obama's own family lost their lives as a result of Churchill's imperialism.
    "The crisis will end when fear changes sides" - Pablo Iglesias Turrión

    "Austerity is used as a cover to reconfigure society and increase inequality and injustice." - Jeremy Corbyn

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