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Thread: Polls on why Brown was elected?

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    Polls on why Brown was elected?

    Just curious can anyone give me any links to any polls taken in Massachusetts on why voters gave Brown the nod? I've been busy with my two businesses and really haven't had the time to look.

    I know the right says it's a down vote on Health Care, or a down vote on Obama, the end of the world as we know it for the dems blah blah blah. (For cripes sake it's only one election and a run off at that, and Bay stateers have elected republicans before for other major offices). I just don't buy those reasons.

    From what little I saw I wouldn't have voted for Coakley as a democrat either if I was still a resident of Massachusetts. But it would have had nothing to do with the Health care bill, or Obama. She struck me as rather arrogant assuming she had it in the bag, at least early on. And the not wanting to shake hands because it was too cold was about as dumb and lazy as it gets.

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    I think the only one that did exit polls was Rasmussen-

    A Final Look at Massachusetts Election Night Poll

    As noted in data released earlier, 56% of Massachusetts voters named health care as the most important issue. That suggests it was a big issue, but Democrat Martha Coakley actually won among those voters by a 53% to 46% margin.

    · Among the 25% who named the economy as the top issue, Republican Scott Brown came out narrowly ahead, 52% to 47%.

    · Only two other issues—national security and taxes—were named as most important by at least five percent (5%) of voters. Brown clearly had the edge on both.

    · Among those who named national security as most important, Brown won 67% to 29%.

    · For those who saw taxes as number one, it was Brown 87%, Coakley 13%.

    The picture gets even murkier when you look at the correlation between approval of the health care plan.

    · Among those who Strongly Favor the plan before Congress, Coakley won 97% of the vote.

    · Among those who Strongly Oppose the plan, 98% voted for Brown.

    · Coakley also picked up 90% of those who Somewhat Favor the plan while Brown was supported by 78% of those who Somewhat Oppose it.

    · One key to Brown’s victory is that 41% Strongly Opposed the plan while just 25% Strongly Favored it.

    Last February, President Obama listed four priorities for Congress to act upon. Voters in Massachusetts, like voters nationwide, named deficit reduction as the top goal and health care second.

    · Among those who named deficit reduction as most important, Brown won 79% to 21%.

    · Among those who named health care reform as the top presidential priority, Coakley won 85% to 19%.

    There was a strong correlation between opinions about the president and votes in the Massachusetts race.

    · Among those who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is handling the job, Coakley won 96% to three percent (3%).

    · Among those who Strongly Disapprove, Brown won 97% to two percent (2%).

    · Brown also won the vote from 95% of those who Somewhat Disapprove of the president’s job performance.

    · However, among those who only Somewhat Approve of the job he's doing, Coakley received just 69% of the vote.

    While there was a somewhat similar correlation to views about Democratic Governor Deval Patrick, there was a clear suggestion that perceptions of the governor’s performance hurt Coakley. Among those voters who approve of the president’s job performance but disapprove of the governor’s, Brown won 93% to seven percent (7%). These voters accounted for just over 15% of all voters.

    A Final Look at Massachusetts Election Night Poll - Rasmussen Reports
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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    Quote Originally Posted by Strucky View Post
    I think the only one that did exit polls was Rasmussen-

    A Final Look at Massachusetts Election Night Poll

    As noted in data released earlier, 56% of Massachusetts voters named health care as the most important issue. That suggests it was a big issue, but Democrat Martha Coakley actually won among those voters by a 53% to 46% margin.

    · Among the 25% who named the economy as the top issue, Republican Scott Brown came out narrowly ahead, 52% to 47%.

    · Only two other issues—national security and taxes—were named as most important by at least five percent (5%) of voters. Brown clearly had the edge on both.

    · Among those who named national security as most important, Brown won 67% to 29%.

    · For those who saw taxes as number one, it was Brown 87%, Coakley 13%.

    The picture gets even murkier when you look at the correlation between approval of the health care plan.

    · Among those who Strongly Favor the plan before Congress, Coakley won 97% of the vote.

    · Among those who Strongly Oppose the plan, 98% voted for Brown.

    · Coakley also picked up 90% of those who Somewhat Favor the plan while Brown was supported by 78% of those who Somewhat Oppose it.

    · One key to Brown’s victory is that 41% Strongly Opposed the plan while just 25% Strongly Favored it.

    Last February, President Obama listed four priorities for Congress to act upon. Voters in Massachusetts, like voters nationwide, named deficit reduction as the top goal and health care second.

    · Among those who named deficit reduction as most important, Brown won 79% to 21%.

    · Among those who named health care reform as the top presidential priority, Coakley won 85% to 19%.

    There was a strong correlation between opinions about the president and votes in the Massachusetts race.

    · Among those who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is handling the job, Coakley won 96% to three percent (3%).

    · Among those who Strongly Disapprove, Brown won 97% to two percent (2%).

    · Brown also won the vote from 95% of those who Somewhat Disapprove of the president’s job performance.

    · However, among those who only Somewhat Approve of the job he's doing, Coakley received just 69% of the vote.

    While there was a somewhat similar correlation to views about Democratic Governor Deval Patrick, there was a clear suggestion that perceptions of the governor’s performance hurt Coakley. Among those voters who approve of the president’s job performance but disapprove of the governor’s, Brown won 93% to seven percent (7%). These voters accounted for just over 15% of all voters.

    A Final Look at Massachusetts Election Night Poll - Rasmussen Reports
    Hmmmmmm.........

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    Quote Originally Posted by Strucky View Post
    I think the only one that did exit polls was Rasmussen-

    A Final Look at Massachusetts Election Night Poll

    As noted in data released earlier, 56% of Massachusetts voters named health care as the most important issue. That suggests it was a big issue, but Democrat Martha Coakley actually won among those voters by a 53% to 46% margin.

    · Among the 25% who named the economy as the top issue, Republican Scott Brown came out narrowly ahead, 52% to 47%.

    · Only two other issues—national security and taxes—were named as most important by at least five percent (5%) of voters. Brown clearly had the edge on both.

    · Among those who named national security as most important, Brown won 67% to 29%.

    · For those who saw taxes as number one, it was Brown 87%, Coakley 13%.

    The picture gets even murkier when you look at the correlation between approval of the health care plan.

    · Among those who Strongly Favor the plan before Congress, Coakley won 97% of the vote.

    · Among those who Strongly Oppose the plan, 98% voted for Brown.

    · Coakley also picked up 90% of those who Somewhat Favor the plan while Brown was supported by 78% of those who Somewhat Oppose it.

    · One key to Brown’s victory is that 41% Strongly Opposed the plan while just 25% Strongly Favored it.

    Last February, President Obama listed four priorities for Congress to act upon. Voters in Massachusetts, like voters nationwide, named deficit reduction as the top goal and health care second.

    · Among those who named deficit reduction as most important, Brown won 79% to 21%.

    · Among those who named health care reform as the top presidential priority, Coakley won 85% to 19%.

    There was a strong correlation between opinions about the president and votes in the Massachusetts race.

    · Among those who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is handling the job, Coakley won 96% to three percent (3%).

    · Among those who Strongly Disapprove, Brown won 97% to two percent (2%).

    · Brown also won the vote from 95% of those who Somewhat Disapprove of the president’s job performance.

    · However, among those who only Somewhat Approve of the job he's doing, Coakley received just 69% of the vote.

    While there was a somewhat similar correlation to views about Democratic Governor Deval Patrick, there was a clear suggestion that perceptions of the governor’s performance hurt Coakley. Among those voters who approve of the president’s job performance but disapprove of the governor’s, Brown won 93% to seven percent (7%). These voters accounted for just over 15% of all voters.

    A Final Look at Massachusetts Election Night Poll - Rasmussen Reports
    Thanks Strucky. Correct me if I'm wrong but nothing as obvious as a cockroach on a wedding cake with this election regardless of how some members of the media are interpreting it or those who's candidate won?

    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar?
    Last edited by EnigmaO01; 01-20-10 at 09:47 PM.

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    Scott Brown's opposition to congressional health care legislation was the most important issue that fueled his U.S. Senate victory in Massachusetts, according to exit poll data collected following the Tuesday special election.


    Fifty-two percent of Bay State voters who were surveyed as the polls closed said they opposed the federal health care reform measure and 42 percent said they cast their ballot to help stop President Obama from passing his chief domestic initiative.


    "I'm not surprised it was the top issue, but I was surprised by how overwhelming an issue it was. It became a focal point for the frustration that has been brewing with voters, and it's a very personal issue that affects everyone," said Tony Fabrizio of Fabrizio, McLaughlin & Associates, a Republican firm that conducted the exit poll of 800 voters.


    "A plurality of voters said their vote was to stop the president's health care plan — more than those saying it was a vote against his policies in general," Fabrizio wrote in a memo that accompanied his exit polling.

    With all the precincts counted, Brown defeated Martha Coakley Tuesday by a five point spread, 52 to 47 percent. No news organizations conducted exit polls of the race.


    According to Fabrizio's findings, 48 percent of Massachusetts voters said that health care was the single issue driving their vote and 39 percent said they voted for Brown specifically because of his vocal opposition to the measure.


    Massachusetts has had a law in place for the past four years that requires every resident to purchase health insurance, and reaction among residents to the mandate has been mixed.


    But Fabrizio said that program remains controversial with voters who have not seen their medical costs drop significantly. "It is grossly over budget and causing the state severe fiscal problems. In short, Massachusetts voters know the shortcomings of government health care," he said.


    Read more: Exit poll: Health care mattered - David Catanese - POLITICO.com

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    That poll reflects the 2 major issues Brown ran on.

    Thanks for posting it.

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    I think there is an anti-incumbent element in there too. Yes I know Coakley wasn't an incumbent but she was associated with Kennedy as such and ran like an overconfident incumbent. Some on the right may be surprised that some of the republicans will be losing their seats in the next round.

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    Come on guys this is Mass.......I Republican has not won a senate seat there aince 1972 and the last one to win this seat was 1952......If the Republicans can win in Mass. they can win anywhere...I even heard the Boxer seat in California is up for grabs...I believe this is the beginning of another 1994 when Newt and the contract with America swept in to take over the congress......
    "God Bless Our Troops in Harms Way."

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    Re: Polls on why Brown was elected?

    Quote Originally Posted by Navy Pride View Post
    Come on guys this is Mass.......I Republican has not won a senate seat there aince 1972 and the last one to win this seat was 1952......If the Republicans can win in Mass. they can win anywhere...I even heard the Boxer seat in California is up for grabs...I believe this is the beginning of another 1994 when Newt and the contract with America swept in to take over the congress......
    So Mitt Romney wasn't a republican? I know he's not a senator but...

    I hear McCain's seat may be up for grabs.

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