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Thread: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Oftencold View Post
    Huh?

    This is like saying that nothing can be unique, even individuals. We have no way at all of predicting the likelihood. And one expects that the occurrence of super-complex forms such as ourselves would be far less likley.

    The fact is that organic life could quite easily be a phenomenon completely limited to this planet. Myself, I doubt there is anything remotely like us anywhere else in Eš
    Human individuals are not that unique. That's populism in the Western world, and particularly North America. The things that define our personalities rely on quite a narrow spectrum in the grand scheme. We can even pathologize our own behaviors with fields like criminology.

    We assume we are complex because we are the dominant species, but maybe in reality we are nothing to write home about.

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    If life was confirmed as existing elsewhere in the universe, do you think our governments would actually tell us about it?

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Orius View Post
    We assume we are complex because we are the dominant species, but maybe in reality we are nothing to write home about.
    There is nothing in the Known Universe even remotely as complex as the human brain.

    Someone once made the illustration that it is the most complex thing in the known universe, as well as the only thing that has discovered the there is a universe.

    Recent research suggests the possibility that the brain, as well as certain other biological processes are manipulating matter at the quantum level, which would make things like organic chemistry rudimentary by comparison.

    And how would we, without supreme complexity comment on the experience of consuming fine chocolate? What else is complex enough besides man and the higher animals, to experience pleasure?

    No. I wouldn't be surprised at all if we are unique.
    Quod scripsi, scripsi

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Orius View Post
    If life was confirmed as existing elsewhere in the universe, do you think our governments would actually tell us about it?
    Governments don't control astronomers. Most discoveries are printed in peer-reviewed journals, over which governments exercise virtually no control. Do you think SETI reports are filtered through the government?

    Conspiracy theories have no place in astronomy.

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Just when you thought you had it all figured out:

    Our World May be a Giant Hologram

    Our world may be a giant hologram - space - 15 January 2009 - New Scientist

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    A rough estimate of stars in the observable universe is 70 sextillion. That's 70,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars.

    CNN.com - Star survey reaches 70 sextillion - Jul. 23, 2003

    Now, let's assume there is a one-to-one ratio of planets and stars (a low estimate) in the observable universe, meaning there is also 70,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 planets. Let's further assume that the likelihood of a planet having life-sustaining conditions similar to those on Earth is a trillionth of a percent.

    There would be approximately seven-hundred million planets that are likely to have such conditions. Basically, it's an astronomical crapshoot and it seems very unlikely that the dye were cast in favor of complex life only ONCE in the entire universe.

    Obviously, this is all just speculation, but it is reasonable speculation in the absence of direct proof.

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Oftencold View Post
    Nope. It's just speculation on a topic about which we know next to nothing.
    Actually, we know A LOT about life and its origins; it's called biology.

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Oftencold View Post
    There is nothing in the Known Universe even remotely as complex as the human brain.
    Black holes are pretty damn complex. Same with time... In fact, I'd say there are many things far more complex than the human brain which exist with astonishing regularity, the universe itself being one of them...
    Someone once made the illustration that it is the most complex thing in the known universe, as well as the only thing that has discovered the there is a universe.
    That second point you make is absolutely incredible. That is, if we are part of the universe, then the universe itself has become self-aware.... Just blows my mind...

    One of my favorite quotes is from Niels Bohr, "A physicist is just an atom's way of looking at itself."
    Recent research suggests the possibility that the brain, as well as certain other biological processes are manipulating matter at the quantum level, which would make things like organic chemistry rudimentary by comparison.
    What research would that be?
    And how would we, without supreme complexity comment on the experience of consuming fine chocolate? What else is complex enough besides man and the higher animals, to experience pleasure?
    Dolphins, hippos, chimps, whales, dogs, cats, birds, pigs... virtually any social creature.
    No. I wouldn't be surprised at all if we are unique.
    I'm constantly surprised at how undistinguished we truly are.

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
    Actually, we know A LOT about life and its origins; it's called biology.
    The amount of knowledge about life can not even be compared to the amount of knowledge we have yet to learn.

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    Re: Scientists discover Earth-like, water-rich planet: study

    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
    A rough estimate of stars in the observable universe is 70 sextillion. That's 70,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars.

    CNN.com - Star survey reaches 70 sextillion - Jul. 23, 2003

    Now, let's assume there is a one-to-one ratio of planets and stars (a low estimate) in the observable universe, meaning there is also 70,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 planets. Let's further assume that the likelihood of a planet having life-sustaining conditions similar to those on Earth is a trillionth of a percent.

    There would be approximately seven-hundred million planets that are likely to have such conditions. Basically, it's an astronomical crapshoot and it seems very unlikely that the dye were cast in favor of complex life only ONCE in the entire universe.

    Obviously, this is all just speculation, but it is reasonable speculation in the absence of direct proof.
    There are that many stars in which universe, the observable universe or the one that actually exists?

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