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Thread: Iraq Nursing Program Crosses Social Barriers and Offers New Hope

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    Iraq Nursing Program Crosses Social Barriers and Offers New Hope

    Iraq Nursing Program Crosses Social Barriers and Offers New Hope - International News | News of the World | Middle East News | Europe News - FOXNews.com

    Luma Falah once dreamed of becoming a dentist, but sanctions, war and a strict Islamic culture in her home country of Iraq made her dream impossible.

    But now Luma is on the front lines of health care as a nursing aid in the village of Saqlawiyah in Western part of the country.

    In this area surrounding Fallujah, villagers adhere to the most conservative Islamic and tribal traditions. Men and women do not interact on any level, not even if itís a matter of life and death.

    Men donít want male doctors touching their wives and daughters. And itís hard to recruit women as nurses or midwives. Many Iraqis view nurses as women of loose morals because they work long hours in hospitals, and they treat male patients.

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    Re: Iraq Nursing Program Crosses Social Barriers and Offers New Hope

    Quote Originally Posted by Scorpion89 View Post
    Iraq Nursing Program Crosses Social Barriers and Offers New Hope - International News | News of the World | Middle East News | Europe News - FOXNews.com

    Luma Falah once dreamed of becoming a dentist, but sanctions, war and a strict Islamic culture in her home country of Iraq made her dream impossible.

    But now Luma is on the front lines of health care as a nursing aid in the village of Saqlawiyah in Western part of the country.

    In this area surrounding Fallujah, villagers adhere to the most conservative Islamic and tribal traditions. Men and women do not interact on any level, not even if itís a matter of life and death.

    Men donít want male doctors touching their wives and daughters. And itís hard to recruit women as nurses or midwives. Many Iraqis view nurses as women of loose morals because they work long hours in hospitals, and they treat male patients.
    Now that is truly sad. I'm wondering why those men who have been the recipients of care by female nurses don't speak out in their defense. Somebody has to take care of the patients. If their culture/religion doesn't permit female nurses to provide treatment to men, why isn't there a massive recruitment effort underway to increase the number of male nurses?

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