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Thread: Stimulus Plan Would Provide Flood of Aid to Education

  1. #1
    RightinNYC's Avatar
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    Mar 2005
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    01-23-11 @ 10:56 PM
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    Stimulus Plan Would Provide Flood of Aid to Education

    The economic stimulus plan that Congress has scheduled for a vote on Wednesday would shower the nation’s school districts, child care centers and university campuses with $150 billion in new federal spending, a vast two-year investment that would more than double the Department of Education’s current budget.

    The proposed emergency expenditures on nearly every realm of education, including school renovation, special education, Head Start and grants to needy college students, would amount to the largest increase in federal aid since Washington began to spend significantly on education after World War II.

    Critics and supporters alike said that by its sheer scope, the measure could profoundly change the federal government’s role in education, which has traditionally been the responsibility of state and local government.
    But Republicans strongly criticized some of the proposals as wasteful spending and an ill-considered expansion of the federal government’s role, traditionally centered on aid to needy students, into new realms like local school construction.

    And they were joined by some education experts from across the political spectrum in wondering how school districts could spend so many new billions so fast, whether such an outpouring of dollars would lead to higher student achievement, and what might happen in two years when the stimulus money ends.

    Analysts were also turning up surprises in the fine print.

    One provision, which was sought by the student lending industry and went unmentioned in early Congressional summaries of the stimulus package, would temporarily increase subsidies to banks in the guaranteed student loan program by tying them to a new index, partly because recent federal intervention in the credit markets has invalidated the previous index. A spokesman for Sallie Mae, one of the largest student lenders, said the change was needed to keep student loan markets fluid. Critics said it represented a potential new windfall for lenders.

    “This just continues the well-established tradition of welfare for the student loan industry,” said Barmak Nassirian, an expert in student lending.
    The bill would, for the first time, involve the federal government in a significant fashion in the building and renovation of schools, which has been the responsibility of states and districts. It includes $20 billion for school renovation and modernization, with $14 billion for elementary and secondary schools and $6 billion for higher education. It also includes tax provisions under which the federal government would pay the interest on construction bonds issued by school districts.
    That's all the bad news, but here's the good:

    The bill would increase 2009 fiscal year spending on Title I, a program of specialized classroom efforts to help educate poor children, to $20 billion from about $14.5 billion, and raise spending on education for disabled children to $17 billion from $11 billion.

    Those increases respond to longtime demands by teachers unions, school boards and others that Washington fully finance the mandates laid out for states and districts in the Bush-era No Child Left Behind law, and in the main federal law regulating special education.
    YAY! We're finally gonna see NCLB in action!


    In higher education, the bill would increase spending on Pell Grants, the most important federal student aid program, to $27 billion from about $19 billion this year.

    “It’s a very good idea to increase Pell Grants in the stimulus,” said Terry Hartle, a senior vice president for public affairs at the American Council on Education, which represents colleges and universities.

    But Mr. Hartle said that even he was having difficulty tracking all the new spending.

    “A lot of things will go through, and only later will we know exactly what happened,” he said.
    People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    North Carolina
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    09-26-12 @ 12:37 AM
    Slightly Conservative

    Re: Stimulus Plan Would Provide Flood of Aid to Education

    A spokesman for Sallie Mae, one of the largest student lenders, said the change was needed to keep student loan markets fluid.
    They lend students!!

    I hate No Child Left Behind. I was in public schools whenever it took effect (in one of the worst public education states in the country[a bit ironic, that NC also has one of the greatest college systems in the world]). If there is an ounce of use for No Child Left Behind then they better as hell bring it out. It is squashing the public education in N.C.
    "I do not underestimate the ability of fanatical groups of terrorists to kill and destroy, but they do not threaten the life of the nation. Whether we would survive Hitler hung in the balance, but there is no doubt that we shall survive al-Qa'ida." -- Lord Hoffmann

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