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Thread: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

  1. #121
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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by chromium View Post
    Imagine they tried to privatize these 12 louisiana colleges, or every K-12. What this by necessity means is only a fraction of today's youth will have access to education. I dunno about you, but that result is not something i've ever heard as a goal by liberals or even dems.

    In contrast, many repubs openly deride the "elitist" mentality that education be universal. It's a proudly anti-intellectual party, despite many of them went to elite schools.
    It's been done. Some latin American countries have been the testing ground of these market based/privatized schemes. Look here: Rethinking Schools Online

    The most interesting comparison is from Chile, which has a long-standing voucher plan where pupils have been assessed regularly. The Chilean plan began in 1980 under the Pinochet military government as part of an overall "de-governmentalization" free-market package. It meets almost all the conditions of those in the United States who advocate "choice with equity," including fully subsidized, deregulated private schools competing head-on for pupils with deregulated municipality-run public schools in all metropolitan neighborhoods, from middle-class suburbs to low-income barrios.
    One key feature of the Chilean plan was privatizing teacher contracts and eliminating the teachers' union as a bargaining unit. Teachers were transferred from the public employee system to the private sector. By 1983, even public schools, meaning those schools run by municipalities, could hire and fire teachers without regard to tenure or a union contract, just like any un-unionized private company. Another feature was to release all schools from the previously strictly-defined structure of the national curriculum and from national standards.
    What were the results of this reform? The first was that even when parents' contributions are included, total spending on education fell quite sharply after increasing in the early 1980s when the central government was paying thousands of teachers severance pay as part of privatizing their contracts. In 1985, the federal contribution was 80% of total educational spending, and total spending was 5.3% of Gross National Product (GNP). Five years later, the federal portion was 68% of the total, and the total had fallen to 3.7% of GNP. Private spending rose, but not quickly enough to offset the drop in real federal contributions. Most of the decrease in federal subsidies to education came at the secondary and university levels, where per student public spending dropped drastically.
    The second result was that in Chile, as in Europe, those who took advantage of the subsidized private schools were predominantly middle- and higher-income families.

  2. #122
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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Here's the outcome:


    Policy Futures in EducationVolume 10 Number 2 2012www.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE
    219
    Neoliberal Education and Student Movements in Chile: Inequalities and Malaise

    Neoliberal Education and StudentMovements in Chile: inequalities and malaise
    CRISTIAN CABALIN

    Instituto de la Comunicación e Imagen,University of Chile
    ABSTRACT This article examines the major consequences of the neoliberal education systemimplemented in Chile during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet and how two important studentmovements contested this structure. In 2006 and 2011, thousands of students filled the streets todemand better public education, more social justice and equal opportunities. They rejected the free-market fundamentalism in education that has generated segregation, stratification and inequalities.Students have become important political actors who re-evaluated the discussion on education inChile. By doing so, they are rejecting the competitive and privatized nature of the current system,which is lacking in quality and equity, and they are demonstrating that new ‘social imaginary’ inChilean education is possible.
    Introduction
    Thousands of Chilean secondary and university students filled the streets of the nation for sevenmonths in 2011. They were marching to demand changes in the educational system that has beenunable to reduce the social and economic differences between poor and rich students. Five yearsearlier, in 2006, another student movement, known as the ‘Penguin Revolution’, foreshadowedthese protests and was the first major Chilean educational movement since the return of democracy in 1990 (Domedel & Peña y Lillo, 2008). Secondary students, nicknamed ‘penguins’ because of their black-and-white school uniforms, were in the streets demanding better publiceducation and more social justice in education.Both student movements shook the elitist Chilean democracy, characterized by low socialparticipation and the exclusion of citizens from the political system (de la Maza, 2010). Yet, themost important outcome of these movements was to generate a public and general criticismtowards neoliberal educational policies implemented in Chile (Anderson, 2011). These policiespromote the continued privatization of the education sector, which values the right of schoolchoice over the right to an equitable education, and also presents education as a commodity, whereschools are presented as a product to buy and sell. Due to this, students have made these factors themajor focus of their protests in hopes of steering away from neoliberal practices. The studentmovements surprised Chile, which is considered one of the most stable countries in Latin Americawith a sustained economic growth in the last decades (Ffrench-Davis, 2002). This economicadvancement, however, has been overshadowed by profound social inequalities produced by theneoliberal project. Chile has one of the most unequal income distributions in the world, with a Ginicoefficient at 0.54 (Sehnbruch & Donoso, 2011).Chile was the first neoliberal experiment in the world (Harvey, 2007). The dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990) imposed neoliberalism during the 1980s, following therecommendations of Milton Friedman, who was a mentor of an array of Chilean economists https://www.academia.edu/1836169/Neo...es_and_malaise

  3. #123
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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by rabbitcaebannog View Post
    including fully subsidized, deregulated private schools
    These are not compatible in the least. Anything subsidized must be regulated, or it has no business being subsidized. I cannot stand to see private for profit entities being given no-bid contracts and billions in taxpayer $.

    These governors need to either stand for the private sector as a matter of principle, meaning to not leech ANY public funds, or make a serious effort to improve public schools. The education of youth is a 'compelling governmental interest,' so it's entirely appropriate to both us public funds AND to regulate it. When you invite the for profit industry to do as they please, kids lose rights and there's no real accountability. You can say "well the parents can just send them to another school if this one decides 300 students and 1 teacher and no extracurriculars is most profitable." Well that's not an option in rural areas and what's to stop it from happening everywhere?

    This all seems like nothing but complete greed and lobbyists. You think bobby jindal gives a **** about K-12 quality?

    I've been arguing to replace a lot of high school and college with online education, but definitely not to transition it to for profit so that a handful of the governor's cronies can make out like bandits

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by chromium View Post
    These are not compatible in the least. Anything subsidized must be regulated, or it has no business being subsidized. I cannot stand to see private for profit entities being given no-bid contracts and billions in taxpayer $.
    Because you have no idea why no-bid contracts are given out.

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by Somerville View Post
    One more example showing us just how well Republican economic ideas work in the real world.



    How big are the cuts to college funding?


    One might almost think the modern Republican Party doesn't much care for public education. An article from February points out the tax cuts being promoted as economic boosters don't seem to be working too well and public education is suffering as a consequence.
    Republicans huh.

    Well let's look at the polar opposite to see how Liberal/Progressives approach the same issue.

    Let's consider the One Party Liberal/Progressive state of California, home to most of the highest taxes and fees in the Nation.


    Higher education: Brown's budget proposal calls for funding increase, tuition freeze - San Jose Mercury News

    The state spends 40 percent less on each UC student and 36 percent less on each CSU student than it did 10 years ago in inflation-adjusted dollars, according to a report released last week by the California Budget Project.

    This year, UC is asking for nearly twice the increase outlined in the governor's budget for the upcoming year -- an additional $125 million to expand, hire more faculty and defray some of the university's pension costs, said spokeswoman Dianne Klein.
    President Donald J Trump, 45th President of the United States of America. A victory born in the hearts and minds of Everyday Americans

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by donsutherland1 View Post
    The economic literature and empirical data on the value of basic research suggests otherwise. Basic research has value and, without a public role, would likely be underfunded. Two papers (one older and one more recent):

    Federal Reserve Bank San Francisco | Reasons for Public Support of Research and Development
    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/I...ukAkcigity.pdf
    I never said government research doesn't turn out results, but only that the government has no business doing it.

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by chromium View Post
    These are not compatible in the least. Anything subsidized must be regulated, or it has no business being subsidized. I cannot stand to see private for profit entities being given no-bid contracts and billions in taxpayer $.

    These governors need to either stand for the private sector as a matter of principle, meaning to not leech ANY public funds, or make a serious effort to improve public schools. The education of youth is a 'compelling governmental interest,' so it's entirely appropriate to both us public funds AND to regulate it. When you invite the for profit industry to do as they please, kids lose rights and there's no real accountability. You can say "well the parents can just send them to another school if this one decides 300 students and 1 teacher and no extracurriculars is most profitable." Well that's not an option in rural areas and what's to stop it from happening everywhere?

    This all seems like nothing but complete greed and lobbyists. You think bobby jindal gives a **** about K-12 quality?

    I've been arguing to replace a lot of high school and college with online education, but definitely not to transition it to for profit so that a handful of the governor's cronies can make out like bandits
    Exactly this : private profit without public accountability ....not at all a good idea

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by rabbitcaebannog View Post
    Military equipment is also supplied by private interest.
    And is purchased solely by the government - which is why competitive pressure does not reduce cost. When you allow have an actual market dominated by private purchasers and non-monopolistic sellers, you get the reduced price and increased quality that we would get from education, were not government the dominant purchaser at the collegiate level and nigh-monopolistic (certainly advantaged) seller at the primary level.
    Worth noting, Democrats: President Trump will have a Pen and a Phone. #Precedent.

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by cpwill View Post
    And is purchased solely by the government - which is why competitive pressure does not reduce cost. When you allow have an actual market dominated by private purchasers and non-monopolistic sellers, you get the reduced price and increased quality that we would get from education, were not government the dominant purchaser at the collegiate level and nigh-monopolistic (certainly advantaged) seller at the primary level.

    Government buys who funds it the most.

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    Re: LSU drafting 'academic bankruptcy' plan in response to state budget crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by Henrin View Post
    I never said government research doesn't turn out results, but only that the government has no business doing it.
    If the economic literature is right about the benefits of basic research and lack of such investment by the private sector (which focuses primarily on applied research), then the government would be acting in a fashion that would leave the U.S. worse off than would otherwise be the case, were it to abandon its role in basic research. Such changed position would not exactly be promoting the "general welfare" of the nation. IMO, there are many other areas that could be targeted for savings than the functions that provide empirically-demonstrated long-term societal and economic benefits.

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