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Thread: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    A substantial portion of the population has access to only one broadband cable provider and/or one DSL provider. This industry is not exactly a bastion of capitalistic competition.


    Hahahahahahah sure let me just check my wallet for a few billion dollars.


    Just because the government does something doesn't mean it's bad.
    So who is going to pay for it? Because the government has nothing until they take it away from someone else. And the government has not only proven itself to provide substandard services at way over competitive prices, but they lack the authority to do this. If you are planning to move, do you first research taxes, schools, medical services and retail establishments? I moved from the Chicago suburbs to the Georgia mountains and there is not a comparable pizza to be had within 40 miles. Should the government be required to build a pizzaria too? Part of the problem here is that we once again started with a flawed premise, that high speed internet is a necessity. It is not. I could live without it and I own a business. Facebook and kitten videos are not food and water.

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by tech30528 View Post
    So who is going to pay for it?
    Pay for what?


    Because the government has nothing until they take it away from someone else. And the government has not only proven itself to provide substandard services at way over competitive prices, but they lack the authority to do this. If you are planning to move, do you first research taxes, schools, medical services and retail establishments? I moved from the Chicago suburbs to the Georgia mountains and there is not a comparable pizza to be had within 40 miles. Should the government be required to build a pizzaria too? Part of the problem here is that we once again started with a flawed premise, that high speed internet is a necessity. It is not. I could live without it and I own a business. Facebook and kitten videos are not food and water.
    What on earth are you talking about? Net neutrality doesn't mean the government starts up an ISP.
    He touched her over her bra and underpants, she says, and guided her hand to touch him over his underwear
    Quote Originally Posted by Lutherf View Post
    We’ll say what? Something like “nothing happened” ... Yeah, we might say something like that.

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    No, Pai did not provide details.

    No, Obama didn't.


    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    When is it being put into effect?
    Hopefully never.
    The Commission is voting on it this month.
    But as it currently contains mostly Democrat lackeys, you know damn well it has a better chance of being approved than not.


    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    He's speculating about impacts
    For the most part he is telling you the generalities of what is going to happen.
    Which is based on his knowledge and experience and it is the same thing others here have said is going to happen.


    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    that I don't have any reason to expect will occur.
    Wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    He is an FCC commissioner now. His last job, on the other hand, was...
    Was what?
    Do you even know?
    Try with the FCC.
    Between 2007 and 2011, Pai held several positions in the FCC’s Office of General Counsel, serving most prominently as Deputy General Counsel. In this role, he had supervisory responsibility over several dozen lawyers in the Administrative Law Division and worked on a wide variety of regulatory and transactional matters involving the wireless, wireline, cable, Internet, media, and satellite industries.[1]

    Pai’s career outside of the FCC has spanned the private and public sectors. With respect to the private sector, Pai worked in the Washington, D.C. office of Jenner & Block LLP, where he was a Partner in the Communications Practice until being sworn in as a Commissioner. Years earlier, he served as Associate General Counsel at Verizon Communications Inc., where he handled competition matters, regulatory issues, and counseling of business units on broadband initiatives.[1]

    Pai also has served in all three branches of the federal government. After moving to Washington, DC in 1998, his first post was with the United States Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division as an Honors Program trial attorney on the Telecommunications Task Force. There, he worked on proposed mergers and acquisitions and on novel requests for regulatory relief following the enactment of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He later returned to the Department of Justice to serve as Senior Counsel in the Office of Legal Policy. Pai has worked on Capitol Hill as well, first as Deputy Chief Counsel to the United States Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts, and later as Chief Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Property Rights. Immediately following law school, he clerked for the Honorable Martin L.C. Feldman of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana.[1]

    In 2013, Pai was scheduled to appear as a featured speaker at the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) Washington DC policy summit and at The LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) Technology Partnership's fall policy forum.[8][9]

    Ajit Varadaraj Pai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Character limit.
    Continued below.
    Last edited by Excon; 02-07-15 at 06:21 PM.
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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    Is there a regulation in Title II that says taxes must be levied on any service classified under the rule?
    Really? This discussion has been going on in the various threads since it was suggested and you don't know?
    I find that hard to believe.


    The FCC imposes fees of 16.1% on interstate telecommunications services that will generate more than $8 billion in federal universal service funds in 2014. Additional FCC fees on interstate telecommunications services raise $1 billion for federal telecommunications relay services. Although Congress mandates the general nature of the federal universal service fund and telecommunications relay services, it is the FCC alone that sets the budget size of the funds and develops the fee structure to raise receipts for the funds.

    Even with all of its power, the FCC does not have the money to fund all of the new programs it seeks. For example, just in the past year, the FCC announced an ambitious multi-billion program to connect schools and libraries with Wi-Fi. Other advocates seek expansion of the low-income program. But where can the FCC find funds for new social programs not required by statute?

    The FCC’s network neutrality proceeding may easily provide the answer. By classifying broadband access services as “interstate telecommunications services,” those services would suddenly become required to pay FCC fees. At the current 16.1% fee structure, it would be perhaps the largest, one-time tax increase on the Internet. The FCC would have many billions of dollars of expanded revenue base to fund new programs without, according to the FCC, any need for congressional authorization.

    FCC Plans Stealth Internet Tax Increase - Forbes


    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    Why would net neutrality suddenly start stifling innovation? It never has before.
    As with much proposed by Dems, you will not find truth in it's title.
    This isn't about neutrality. It is about regulation and taxation.
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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by Excon View Post

    No, Obama didn't.


    Hopefully never.
    The Commission is voting on it this month.
    But as it currently contains mostly Democrat lackeys, you know damn well it has a better chance of being approved than not.


    For the most part he is telling you the generalities of what is going to happen.
    Which is based on his knowledge and experience and it is the same thing others here have said is going to happen.


    Wrong.

    Was what?
    Do you even know?
    Try with the FCC.
    Between 2007 and 2011, Pai held several positions in the FCC’s Office of General Counsel, serving most prominently as Deputy General Counsel. In this role, he had supervisory responsibility over several dozen lawyers in the Administrative Law Division and worked on a wide variety of regulatory and transactional matters involving the wireless, wireline, cable, Internet, media, and satellite industries.[1]

    Pai’s career outside of the FCC has spanned the private and public sectors. With respect to the private sector, Pai worked in the Washington, D.C. office of Jenner & Block LLP, where he was a Partner in the Communications Practice until being sworn in as a Commissioner. Years earlier, he served as Associate General Counsel at Verizon Communications Inc., where he handled competition matters, regulatory issues, and counseling of business units on broadband initiatives.[1]

    Pai also has served in all three branches of the federal government. After moving to Washington, DC in 1998, his first post was with the United States Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division as an Honors Program trial attorney on the Telecommunications Task Force. There, he worked on proposed mergers and acquisitions and on novel requests for regulatory relief following the enactment of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He later returned to the Department of Justice to serve as Senior Counsel in the Office of Legal Policy. Pai has worked on Capitol Hill as well, first as Deputy Chief Counsel to the United States Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts, and later as Chief Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Property Rights. Immediately following law school, he clerked for the Honorable Martin L.C. Feldman of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana.[1]

    In 2013, Pai was scheduled to appear as a featured speaker at the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) Washington DC policy summit and at The LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) Technology Partnership's fall policy forum.[8][9]

    Ajit Varadaraj Pai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Character limit.
    Continued below.

    Please explain using specifics how innovation will be stifled by the FCC upholding net neutrality. No generalities, no vague buzzwords, no more evasions and non-answers...specifics. Walk us through this.

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    The FCC imposes fees of 16.1% on interstate telecommunications services that will generate more than $8 billion in federal universal service funds in 2014. Additional FCC fees on interstate telecommunications services raise $1 billion for federal telecommunications relay services. Although Congress mandates the general nature of the federal universal service fund and telecommunications relay services, it is the FCC alone that sets the budget size of the funds and develops the fee structure to raise receipts for the funds.

    Even with all of its power, the FCC does not have the money to fund all of the new programs it seeks. For example, just in the past year, the FCC announced an ambitious multi-billion program to connect schools and libraries with Wi-Fi. Other advocates seek expansion of the low-income program. But where can the FCC find funds for new social programs not required by statute?

    The FCC’s network neutrality proceeding may easily provide the answer. By classifying broadband access services as “interstate telecommunications services,” those services would suddenly become required to pay FCC fees. At the current 16.1% fee structure, it would be perhaps the largest, one-time tax increase on the Internet. The FCC would have many billions of dollars of expanded revenue base to fund new programs without, according to the FCC, any need for congressional authorization.

    FCC Plans Stealth Internet Tax Increase - Forbes



    As with much proposed by Dems, you will not find truth in it's title.
    This isn't about neutrality. It is about regulation and taxation.
    This opinion piece doesn't cite a specific regulation that says all such classifications require the tax in question.

    I know that the tax can be applied. Will it? Can't our Republican-controlled congress pass a bill exempting internet access from our tax? Why does everyone act like the specifics are already set in stone?
    He touched her over her bra and underpants, she says, and guided her hand to touch him over his underwear
    Quote Originally Posted by Lutherf View Post
    We’ll say what? Something like “nothing happened” ... Yeah, we might say something like that.

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by What if...? View Post
    I don't want to pay for access to dozens of sports sites to be able to come here to debate politics. Like cable. Nor do I want to wait dial up times for a page to open here.
    You already are. You are not only paying your internet service provider for access to dozens of sports sites, you are paying it for access to the entirety of accessible websites, in order to come here to debate politics. You are not just paying for debatepolitics.com.
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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue_State View Post
    This issue sucks because the solution that works best for the people is not going to be the solution that is going to work for the government or the corporations. No matter how this plays out, we lose.
    You only lose if you let the government fascistically control yet another portion of our society. A coup has occurred. We are no longer free.

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by Adamaris View Post
    I don't know... Of course, we need to watch out for the government not to expand it power too much, but in this particular case...
    I've been watching this debate for some time, and as far as I understand, for once in a while our government is doing the right thing. It restricts the companies from making the user to pay not only for the Internet access, but also for access to certain sites. Just imagine you were forced to pay extra if you wanted to access Youtube, for example. Or this forum...
    Government never does the right thing. You just have not felt the full pain yet. This is like rolling out Obamacare over a period of years. One should not heat the water that boils the frog too quickly lest the frog recognize the danger and jump free.

    You willingly give up what little liberty you have so that government can control you.

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    Re: No fast or slow lanes for Internet? New rules proposed

    Quote Originally Posted by tacomancer View Post
    There is plenty of room in the ground for a ditch witch. that's how our cabling is here, almost all in the ground.

    but regardless, we are past that point now. The market is what it is, and because it is this way, it needs to be treated as a utility.
    It won't be long before the government will decide what each of us may have or not have. The Soviet Union had such a system. If you were a member of the Communist Party you had poor service. If you were not you had no service. It will be the same here.

    I do not understand why we have not yet rebelled and swept Washington DC free from its political vermin.

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