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Thread: Ebola’s ground zero: This bat-filled tree may be where the outbreak started

  1. #11
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    Re: Ebola’s ground zero: This bat-filled tree may be where the outbreak started

    Quote Originally Posted by Lursa View Post
    Really? The fungus probably grew on their moist droppings but it would have come from the house...mold or mildew probably. I doubt bats 'carry' histoplasmosis. Weird, but maybe.
    My husband the high fever, chills, cough that lingered. He thought he might have pneumonia so he went to doctor. The X-Ray showed spots all over his lungs and the X-ray tech and his GP thought it was cancer that had spread from another area of his body.

    They did a biopsy of his lung and found out it was histoplasmosis.
    They took a cat scan and found out the fungus had also spread to his kidneys. He was on anti fungal meds for a year and had to have a yearly a cat scan for the next three years.

    His was an aggressive case.

    From the Illinois Department of Health


    Histoplasmosis

    Histoplasmosis is caused by a fungus (Histoplasma capsulatum) found primarily in the areas drained by the Mississippi and Ohio rivers. Both humans and animals can be affected. The disease is transmitted to humans by airborne fungus spores from soil contaminated by pigeon and starling droppings (as well as from the droppings of other birds and bats). The soil under a roost usually has to have been enriched by droppings for two years or more for the disease organism to reach significant levels. Although almost always associated with soil, the fungus has been found in droppings (particularly from bats) alone, such as in an attic.

    Infection occurs when spores, carried by the air are inhaled — especially after a roost has been disturbed. Most infections are mild and produce either no symptoms or a minor influenza- like illness. On occasion, the disease can cause high fever, blood abnormalities, pneumonia and even death. In some areas, including portions of Illinois, up to 80 percent of the population show evidence of previous infection. Outbreaks of histoplasmosis have occurred in Central Illinois.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has reported a potentially blinding eye condition — presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (OHS) — that probably results from the fungus. NIH estimates that 4 percent of those exposed to the disease are at risk of developing OHS.
    HEALTH HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH BIRD AND BAT DROPPINGS
    When it comes to matters of reproduce health, Politicians and the religious dogma of another faith should never interfere with religious liberty of an individual or her faith.

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    Re: Ebola’s ground zero: This bat-filled tree may be where the outbreak started

    Quote Originally Posted by minnie616 View Post
    My husband the high fever, chills, cough that lingered. He thought he might have pneumonia so he went to doctor. The X-Ray showed spots all over his lungs and the X-ray tech and his GP thought it was cancer that had spread from another area of his body.

    They did a biopsy of his lung and found out it was histoplasmosis.
    They took a cat scan and found out the fungus had also spread to his kidneys. He was on anti fungal meds for a year and had to have a yearly a cat scan for the next three years.

    His was an aggressive case.

    From the Illinois Department of Health



    HEALTH HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH BIRD AND BAT DROPPINGS
    Yes but I wonder how their droppings got contaminated? Bat dont 'carry' the fungus that causes histoplasmosis. That's why I wondered about the condition behind the walls.

    And I'm very sorry to hear your husband had to go through that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have felt pain when I was in the womb. So when you say they are incapable of feeling pain, that is based on junk science.
    Quote Originally Posted by applejuicefool View Post
    A murderer putting a bullet through someone's brain is a medical procedure too.

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    Re: Ebola’s ground zero: This bat-filled tree may be where the outbreak started

    Quote Originally Posted by Lursa View Post
    Yes but I wonder how their droppings got contaminated? Bat dont 'carry' the fungus that causes histoplasmosis. That's why I wondered about the condition behind the walls.

    And I'm very sorry to hear your husband had to go through that.
    Thank you for your kind thoughts also.
    However ,
    fresh bat droppings can contain the histoplasmosis fungus.

    From the same Illinois website.


    The incidence of histoplasmosis being transmitted from bat droppings to humans is not thought to be high. Nevertheless, fresh bat droppings (unlike fresh bird dropping) can contain the histoplasmosis fungus. Bat droppings do not need to come into contact with soil to be a source of the disease.
    http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbb&bdrp.htm
    When it comes to matters of reproduce health, Politicians and the religious dogma of another faith should never interfere with religious liberty of an individual or her faith.

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    Re: Ebola’s ground zero: This bat-filled tree may be where the outbreak started

    Quote Originally Posted by minnie616 View Post
    Thank you for your kind thoughts also.
    However ,
    fresh bat droppings can contain the histoplasmosis fungus.

    From the same Illinois website.



    HEALTH HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH BIRD AND BAT DROPPINGS
    I wonder if they get it by preening their fur and birds by preening their feathers? Otherwise I dont know how or why they would be ingesting a fungus.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have felt pain when I was in the womb. So when you say they are incapable of feeling pain, that is based on junk science.
    Quote Originally Posted by applejuicefool View Post
    A murderer putting a bullet through someone's brain is a medical procedure too.

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    Re: Ebola’s ground zero: This bat-filled tree may be where the outbreak started

    Quote Originally Posted by Lursa View Post
    I wonder if they get it by preening their fur and birds by preening their feathers? Otherwise I dont know how or why they would be ingesting a fungus.
    I have not found the source yet.

    But this was on the CDC link


    Histoplasmosis is another disease associated with bats. Its symptoms vary greatly, but the disease primarily affects the lungs. Occasionally, other organs are affected. When this happens it can be fatal if untreated.


    In addition, Histoplasmosis is caused by a fungus that grows in soil and material contaminated with droppings from animals, including bats. Droppings, also known as bat guano, can contaminate the soil and cause infectious spores to be released when the soil is disturbed.

    Even though it can be found throughout the world, it is widespread in certain areas of the U.S. and can be found in places that harbor large populations of bats, including caves.

    While most infected persons have no apparent ill effects, antifungal medications are used to treat many forms of the disease.

    Bats and Diseases around the World

    Even though rabies and histoplasmosis can be found all over the world, some diseases associated with bats are found exclusively in certain regions of the world. Notably, research suggests that bats might be the source of several hemorrhagic fevers, which affect multiple organ systems in the body and often lead to life-threatening diseases.

    One of these diseases is Marburg hemorrhagic fever, which is found exclusively in Africa. Past outbreaks have shown that Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever kills up to 90% of those infected.

    While the natural host had for years been unknown, new research suggests that fruit bats are a natural source of this virus, and the virus has been isolated repetitively from fruit bats in Uganda.

    The same may be true for Ebola hemorraghic fever.
    The virus that causes this disease is often referred to as the "cousin" of Marburg virus, since they are the only distinct viruses that belong to a group of viruses known as filoviruses. Like Marburg, Ebola is highly fatal and is found mostly in Africa. Recent studies indicate that, as with Marburg, bats are likely to be a natural source of this virus, although no Ebola virus has been isolated from bats.

    Two other viruses - Nipah (which causes Nipah virus encephalitis) and Hendra (which causes Hendra virus disease) - are also associated with bats. Research suggests that Hendra virus is associated with fruit bats (commonly called flying foxes) in Australia. Nipah and related viruses are also associated with the same group of bats in Southeast Asia and parts of Africa, although outbreaks of disease in humans have so far been limited to Malaysia, Singapore, India, and Bangladesh. Both viruses can cause severe respiratory and neurologic disease in humans.

    Another group of viruses known as coronaviruses have been detected in multiple species of bats. Coronavirus infection can sometimes cause mild respiratory illness in humans, but these viruses were also implicated in the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Southeast Asia. While bats do not carry or transmit SARS, research has linked coronaviruses to bats in countries all over the world.

    In addition, Lyssaviruses have been discovered on every inhabited continent. This group of viruses causes rabies, in addition to other diseases that can be fatal to humans. While current rabies vaccines are effective against many of the viruses in this group, several Lyssaviruses identified in Africa and Asia primarily associated with bats cannot be prevented with current rabies vaccines.

    Further studies may shed light on the role of bats as the source of these viruses and their ability to transmit diseases caused by these viruses to humans.
    Take Caution When Bats Are Near | Features | CDC
    When it comes to matters of reproduce health, Politicians and the religious dogma of another faith should never interfere with religious liberty of an individual or her faith.

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