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Thread: Acidic ocean blamed for scallop die-off

  1. #51
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    Re: Acidic ocean blamed for scallop die-off

    Quote Originally Posted by NIMBY View Post
    To edit, 'p' means ' -Log ' in Chemistry.
    pH = the negative log of the Hydronium/Hydogen ion concentration, as I showed in #11.
    Something caused the Hydrogen ion concentration to increase OR the Hydoxide ion concentration to decrease or both.
    The 'product' of the two conc. is a constant, 1.0 x 10-14.
    pH + pOH add to 14, showing their inverse relation in another math way.

    This 7.2 pH is now slightly less than our blood--at 7.4--but above natural rainfall--at 6.5--just below neutral at 7.
    Conc. is measured in MOLES of Hydrogen ion per liter of solution,
    with moles coming from mass in grams divided by molar mass, which comes from the Periodic table.

    There are probably several hypotheses just hitting the table of investigation.

    'Addendum'
    The 6 or 7 in pH readings is not a "significant figure", since they are exponential place-holders.
    A Hydrogen ion concentration of 0.000 0010, or 1.0 x 10 -6 , yields a pH of 6.00.
    pH of 7.00 comes from 1.0 x 10 -7 .
    The concentration of Hydrogen ion is TEN times less at 7.00 vs. 6.00 .
    And is the relationship direct? I.E. ten times the hydrogen in the water would require ten times the CO2 in the atmosphere?
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  2. #52
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    Re: Acidic ocean blamed for scallop die-off

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    And is the relationship direct? I.E. ten times the hydrogen in the water would require ten times the CO2 in the atmosphere?
    No

    At some point the water would reach a saturation point (which changes at different temperatures) Also it would depend on how much aeration the water is getting. During a storm with lots of waves the water will also absorb more atmospheric gases ( at least for a period of time
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