Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 33 of 33

Thread: U.S. holds talks about Yemen detention center for Guantanamo inmates

  1. #31
    Guru
    annata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    beneath the bodi tree
    Last Seen
    02-16-17 @ 12:52 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    3,163

    Re: U.S. holds talks about Yemen detention center for Guantanamo inmates

    Quote Originally Posted by MMC View Post
    Like I said Annata if they can break into and out of Military Prisons that have more firepower.....I don't think they would have any trouble going after a State Prison. same deal with them going after any guarded installations. They don't have tanks.....and they weren't afraid to take on US Special Forces and the Brits. Some Prisons guards who aren't use to those fighting back. Easy pickins.

    They would have to keep those Terrorists doped up on the Thorazine 24/7......wherein they see all in black and white and do nothing but the Drugged mans shuffle. Sentencing them to life isn't going to work. Not with them. Again they are willing to die and eagerly as well as with any coverage they can get.
    thise prison breaks are not US prisons /though I take your point. we'll have to agree to disagree on this one my friend
    Oṃ maṇi padme hūṃ

  2. #32
    Iconoclast
    DaveFagan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    wny
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:17 PM
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    7,311

    Re: U.S. holds talks about Yemen detention center for Guantanamo inmates

    Quote Originally Posted by annata View Post
    thise prison breaks are not US prisons /though I take your point. we'll have to agree to disagree on this one my friend
    You need to think more about Guantanamo.

    The CIA

    "That’s according to a ruling by Army colonel and military commission judge James Pohl, who issued a “protective order” in January of 2013 that, in effect, classified the memories of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and the other four defendants—Walid Bin Attash and Ramzi bin al Shibh of Yemen, Ammar al Baluchi of Pakistan, and Mustafa al Hawsawi of Saudi Arabia.

    Their names remain opaque to most Americans, as do the legal proceedings based on their torturous experiences during “enhanced interrogation” at various “black sites.” Now, defense attorneys for the five men would like to file suit under the U.N. Convention Against Torture, which the United States signed in 1988 and ratified in 1994.

    They cannot.

    All legal claims of torture at the hands of the CIA during “extraordinary rendition” fall under the restrictive blanket of secrecy issued by Col. Pohl, who claims he is only empowered to classify material, not vice-versa."

    "In response to recent defense challenges to Pohl’s protective order, the prosecution countered with a rationale for secrecy drawn, it seems, from the pages of George Orwell or Philip K. Dick. According to Carol Rosenberg of the Miami Herald, one government prosecutor argued that “… the United States government has absolute control of U.S. captive’s CIA memories because where they were held and what was done to them is classified as ‘sources and methods’ used by the CIA in the now defunct Rendition, Detention and Interrogation program.”

    Essentially, the memories of their treatment by the CIA have become the proprietary possession of the CIA. It is the ultimate application of “national security” as a legal fig leaf. And it illustrates the reality that “national security” classification often does more to protect people in the national security business than it does to protect the security of the nation.

    Yet, it doesn’t always help in a criminal prosecution—which is why Mohammed al Qahtani remains in perpetual limbo in Gitmo’s memory hole. One of the men accused of being “The 20th Hijacker,” the case against al Qahtani was finally dropped in January of 2009 by retired judge Susan Crawford, the military commission’s Convening Authority. Why? Because Judge Crawford determined that his handling by the military was, in fact, torture."

    Admittedly, these specific scumbags genuinely qualify as scumbags, but it appears there are just as many scumbags on the prosecution side. Slippery slopes or flagrant illegality. What's that bout liberty, freedom, democracy, justice, Bill Of Rights, etc. In your imagination, eh?

  3. #33
    Guru
    annata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    beneath the bodi tree
    Last Seen
    02-16-17 @ 12:52 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    3,163

    Re: U.S. holds talks about Yemen detention center for Guantanamo inmates

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveFagan View Post
    You need to think more about Guantanamo.

    The CIA

    "That’s according to a ruling by Army colonel and military commission judge James Pohl, who issued a “protective order” in January of 2013 that, in effect, classified the memories of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and the other four defendants—Walid Bin Attash and Ramzi bin al Shibh of Yemen, Ammar al Baluchi of Pakistan, and Mustafa al Hawsawi of Saudi Arabia.

    Their names remain opaque to most Americans, as do the legal proceedings based on their torturous experiences during “enhanced interrogation” at various “black sites.” Now, defense attorneys for the five men would like to file suit under the U.N. Convention Against Torture, which the United States signed in 1988 and ratified in 1994.

    They cannot.

    All legal claims of torture at the hands of the CIA during “extraordinary rendition” fall under the restrictive blanket of secrecy issued by Col. Pohl, who claims he is only empowered to classify material, not vice-versa."

    "In response to recent defense challenges to Pohl’s protective order, the prosecution countered with a rationale for secrecy drawn, it seems, from the pages of George Orwell or Philip K. Dick. According to Carol Rosenberg of the Miami Herald, one government prosecutor argued that “… the United States government has absolute control of U.S. captive’s CIA memories because where they were held and what was done to them is classified as ‘sources and methods’ used by the CIA in the now defunct Rendition, Detention and Interrogation program.”

    Essentially, the memories of their treatment by the CIA have become the proprietary possession of the CIA. It is the ultimate application of “national security” as a legal fig leaf. And it illustrates the reality that “national security” classification often does more to protect people in the national security business than it does to protect the security of the nation.

    Yet, it doesn’t always help in a criminal prosecution—which is why Mohammed al Qahtani remains in perpetual limbo in Gitmo’s memory hole. One of the men accused of being “The 20th Hijacker,” the case against al Qahtani was finally dropped in January of 2009 by retired judge Susan Crawford, the military commission’s Convening Authority. Why? Because Judge Crawford determined that his handling by the military was, in fact, torture."

    Admittedly, these specific scumbags genuinely qualify as scumbags, but it appears there are just as many scumbags on the prosecution side. Slippery slopes or flagrant illegality. What's that bout liberty, freedom, democracy, justice, Bill Of Rights, etc. In your imagination, eh?
    no of course not ( to your bolded part). I'd only want them in prison with due process, no more indefinate detentions.
    No more black prisons. No more CIA run "signature strikes".
    If we cannot capture, and try them ( and I'd prefer a civilian court), we have no business holding anyone.
    Oṃ maṇi padme hūṃ

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •