Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 103

Thread: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

  1. #31
    Sage
    VanceMack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:28 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    54,677

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by cpwill View Post
    Nah, Blue State is right. Bin Laden originally offered his services to the Saudis, but they turned him down in favor of the U.S. (it seemed they preferred to depend upon "tanks and airplace" vice depending on "the avenging wind of Allah" ). There is no hell like a woman (Islamist, whatever) scorned.
    Perhaps

    Formation and structuring of al-Qaeda
    Main article: Al-Qaeda
    By 1988, bin Laden had split from Maktab al-Khidamat. While Azzam acted as support for Afghan fighters, bin Laden wanted a more military role. One of the main points leading to the split and the creation of al-Qaeda was Azzam's insistence that Arab fighters be integrated among the Afghan fighting groups instead of forming a separate fighting force.[75] Notes of a meeting of bin Laden and others on August 20, 1988 indicate that al-Qaeda was a formal group by that time: "Basically an organized Islamic faction, its goal is to lift the word of God, to make his religion victorious." A list of requirements for membership itemized the following: listening ability, good manners, obedience, and making a pledge (bayat) to follow one's superiors.

  2. #32
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Chicago Illinois
    Last Seen
    10-14-15 @ 09:28 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Private
    Posts
    56,981

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by cpwill View Post
    You may enjoy this.
    This may be better.


    Obama's deputy national security adviser, Tony Blinken, picked up the sales pitch for the absent president Thursday, appearing on several morning news shows.

    In an appearance on MSNBC, Blinken said he believes the American people will be more supportive of Obama's request once they see the Syrian situation as a separate and distinct problem as opposed to viewing it "in the prism of the last decade" of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    "This is not open-ended. This is not boots on the ground. This is not Afghanistan. This is not Iraq. This is not even Libya," Blinken said.

    He said that if the United States does not stand up to Assad and against the use of chemical weapons, some world figures will believe "it's OK to use them with impunity."

    Secretary of State John Kerry, testifying for the second consecutive day before Congress, insisted that the U.S. military response would be restricted as Americans fatigued by more than a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan show little inclination to get involved in Syria.

    "I don't believe we're going to war, I just don't believe that," Kerry told the House Foreign Affairs Committee, citing the ground troops and long-term commitment that he said wars entail. "That's not what we're doing here. The president is asking for permission to take a limited military action, yes, but one that does not put Americans in the middle of the battle."

    Paul, a Kentucky conservative with strong tea party ties, has threatened a filibuster, although he acknowledged that proponents have the votes to prevail in the Senate, and he pinned his hopes on the House.

    The notion of a contained operation has failed to sway many Republicans and Democrats in the House, who question why the U.S. should get involved now in a Syrian civil war that has killed an estimated 100,000, displaced millions and is in its third year. While House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., have expressed support for military action, but rank-and-file Republicans remain reluctant or outright opposed.

    Speaking in Sweden on Wednesday, Obama left open the possibility he would order retaliation for the deadly chemical weapons attack even if Congress withheld its approval.

    "I always preserve the right and responsibility to act on behalf of America's national security," he told a news conference. In a challenge to lawmakers back home, he said Congress' credibility was on the line, not his own, despite saying a year ago that the use of chemical weapons would cross a "red line."

    Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., a proponent of aggressive U.S. military action in Syria, joined forces with Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware to add a provision calling for "decisive changes to the present military balance of power on the ground in Syria.".....snip~

    Divided vote foreshadows Obama challenge on Syria


    Funny Guy that Johnny Quest McCain......we need some decisive changes here at home too. Like Johnny B Good here.....being told, that's it you're done. Time to meet up with that Cow Goomi. See that Pasture. That's your new home.

    To Bad Obama can't fall back on National Security for this one.....interests yes. National Security.....not even close. Moreover nothing but a false excuse and one where Direct Confrontation Needs to be brought to bare. As the American people are tired of that Lame ass excuse.

    See what we have here is Obama thinking he can put the Blame on Congress now. His hope and way out. At least in his mind.
    Last edited by MMC; 09-05-13 at 10:16 AM.

  3. #33
    Sage
    Montecresto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Seen
    03-13-16 @ 11:59 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    24,561

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by MMC View Post
    This may be better.


    Obama's deputy national security adviser, Tony Blinken, picked up the sales pitch for the absent president Thursday, appearing on several morning news shows.

    In an appearance on MSNBC, Blinken said he believes the American people will be more supportive of Obama's request once they see the Syrian situation as a separate and distinct problem as opposed to viewing it "in the prism of the last decade" of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    "This is not open-ended. This is not boots on the ground. This is not Afghanistan. This is not Iraq. This is not even Libya," Blinken said.

    He said that if the United States does not stand up to Assad and against the use of chemical weapons, some world figures will believe "it's OK to use them with impunity."

    Secretary of State John Kerry, testifying for the second consecutive day before Congress, insisted that the U.S. military response would be restricted as Americans fatigued by more than a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan show little inclination to get involved in Syria.

    "I don't believe we're going to war, I just don't believe that," Kerry told the House Foreign Affairs Committee, citing the ground troops and long-term commitment that he said wars entail. "That's not what we're doing here. The president is asking for permission to take a limited military action, yes, but one that does not put Americans in the middle of the battle."

    Paul, a Kentucky conservative with strong tea party ties, has threatened a filibuster, although he acknowledged that proponents have the votes to prevail in the Senate, and he pinned his hopes on the House.

    The notion of a contained operation has failed to sway many Republicans and Democrats in the House, who question why the U.S. should get involved now in a Syrian civil war that has killed an estimated 100,000, displaced millions and is in its third year. While House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., have expressed support for military action, but rank-and-file Republicans remain reluctant or outright opposed.

    Speaking in Sweden on Wednesday, Obama left open the possibility he would order retaliation for the deadly chemical weapons attack even if Congress withheld its approval.

    "I always preserve the right and responsibility to act on behalf of America's national security," he told a news conference. In a challenge to lawmakers back home, he said Congress' credibility was on the line, not his own, despite saying a year ago that the use of chemical weapons would cross a "red line."

    Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., a proponent of aggressive U.S. military action in Syria, joined forces with Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware to add a provision calling for "decisive changes to the present military balance of power on the ground in Syria.".....snip~

    Divided vote foreshadows Obama challenge on Syria


    Funny Guy that Johnny Quest McCain......we need some decisive changes here at home too. Like Johnny B Good here.....being told, that's it you're done. Time to meet up with that Cow Goomi. See that Pasture. That's your new home.

    To Bad Obama can't fall back on National Security for this one.....interests yes. National Security.....not even close. Moreover nothing but a false excuse and one where Direct Confrontation Needs to be brought to bare. As the American people are tired of that Lame ass excuse.

    See what we have here is Obama thinking he can put the Blame on Congress now. His hope and way out. At least in his mind.
    The morning shows where the brain numb get their information. The show is on, the propaganda machine facilitated by the networks which are owned in large part by defence contractors as willing accomplices will be persuading the dumb and gullible Americans, AGAIN, that this is in their best interests. If you keep on buying this **** over and over, I'm uncertain as to who is worse, the retailer or the consumer!

  4. #34
    Global Moderator
    Moderator

    Zyphlin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    NoMoAuchie
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    47,971

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by Slyhunter View Post
    [/FONT][/COLOR]The House’s Syria hearing: Live updates
    This might change things.
    Is our Army for hire?
    Sounds a lot like "The war will pay for itself".

    Unless the money was handed over up front, I don't buy it. Even then, I'm not sure how much this should really impact the decision to go or not.

  5. #35
    Sage
    Montecresto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Seen
    03-13-16 @ 11:59 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    24,561

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    Sounds a lot like "The war will pay for itself".

    Unless the money was handed over up front, I don't buy it. Even then, I'm not sure how much this should really impact the decision to go or not.
    We haven't heard who's compensating the loss of blood, both to the civilians that will be killed by our assault as well as any of our soldiers!

  6. #36
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Chicago Illinois
    Last Seen
    10-14-15 @ 09:28 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Private
    Posts
    56,981

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    The morning shows where the brain numb get their information. The show is on, the propaganda machine facilitated by the networks which are owned in large part by defence contractors as willing accomplices will be persuading the dumb and gullible Americans, AGAIN, that this is in their best interests. If you keep on buying this **** over and over, I'm uncertain as to who is worse, the retailer or the consumer!

    Well the Progressives are trying to tell Obama themselves. From Salon.

    The real reason not to intervene in Syria



    Demands by politicians and pundits for intervention in Syria have become so strong that they now seem to be influencing U.S. policy. But are they right? The most emotionally powerful arguments came from the State Department former policy planning head Anne-Marie Slaughter. The Obama administration is in danger of letting genocide akin to the one in Rwanda in the 1990s occur, she wrote, in the Washington Post. The case of Rwanda haunts Democrats. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright called not saving Rwandans her “greatest regret” from her time in office, “something that sits very heavy on all our souls.” U.N. ambassador Susan Rice has similarly expressed agony over U.S. failure to intervene in Rwanda.

    Why are humanitarian interventions so difficult? Kuperman theorizes that when rebels are assisted by outside forces, they are unintentionally encouraged to become more reckless in fighting a regime or provoking it, resist negotiations, and expand their ambitions. Intervention can thereby produce a perverse situation of prolonging a conflict that results in more deaths. He calls this the “moral hazard of humanitarian intervention.” Even the expectation or the mistaken belief of outside support can encourage rebels to continue fighting or resist settlements.

    Right now, the U.S. public is overwhelmingly hostile to military intervention in Syria. Kuperman speculates that what had previously been a nonviolent uprising in Syria in early 2011 became an armed rebellion when Syrians saw that the U.S. supported Libyan rebels. “I think the Syrians were looking at this and saying, ‘Hey, we’ve been peaceful and getting nothing while the Libyans got outside help,’” he says. As a result of the Syrian opposition transforming their methods from nonviolent to an armed rebellion, the death toll has increased approximately 15 times per week, estimates Kuperman.

    It should also be noted that these are purely discussions of humanitarian interventions, divorced from considerations about American interests. For the U.S. in the Middle East, there are no good options: Non-intervention spurs resentment at perceived American indifference to suffering; intervention spurs resentment at perceived American meddling. Encouraging negotiations means discouraging grand ambitions; supporting one side means alienating another. The toxic history of American and Western imperialism in the Middle East means that for a long time, the U.S. is simply going to be disliked in the Middle East. As George Washington University professor Marc Lynch puts it in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs, “In the Middle East, haters gonna hate.”

    The humanitarian impulse is a noble one, spurred by good intentions. But good intentions, even if they don’t pave the road to hell, can sometimes take us a good way there. Those calling for intervention in Syria should seriously consider the possibility that outside interference may be counterproductive.....snip~

    The real reason not to intervene in Syria - Salon.com

  7. #37
    Sage
    Montecresto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Seen
    03-13-16 @ 11:59 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    24,561

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Anne Marie SLAUGHTER! What a fitting name.

    Btw MMC, do you think I blame unprovoked aggression on righties only?

  8. #38
    Be different, be honest
    EdwinWillers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Divided States of Kardashia
    Last Seen
    12-25-15 @ 04:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    4,361

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by EdwinWillers View Post
    They've got our money. They've got our weapons. What we don't have that they do is the common sense to stay out of fights like this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Medusa View Post
    Originally Posted by EdwinWillers
    They've got our money:. They've got our weapons. What we don't have that they do is the common sense to stay out of fights like this.
    Well, they don't give us their oil for free.
    Who chimes "No Absolutes!" chimes absolutely.

    zoom zoom

  9. #39
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Chicago Illinois
    Last Seen
    10-14-15 @ 09:28 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Private
    Posts
    56,981

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    Anne Marie SLAUGHTER! What a fitting name.

    Btw MMC, do you think I blame unprovoked aggression on righties only?
    Looks like to me you have been hitting up both sides like I am. Course many don't go all into the threads on this issue. Also which then they will fall back to which News Source is telling the truth or and facts. Who is writing what etc etc.

    Ive gone after those Neo Cons myself.....see if they want to be about War. Well something has to come home in return for a change. Moreover it has to be done.....where something is taken. As well as something that would be a threat to our National Security.

  10. #40
    Be different, be honest
    EdwinWillers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Divided States of Kardashia
    Last Seen
    12-25-15 @ 04:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    4,361

    Re: Kerry: Arab countries offered to pay for invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by calamity View Post
    Kerry is a first class idiot.
    Agreed, though considering the context, I'd replace "first" with "world"
    Who chimes "No Absolutes!" chimes absolutely.

    zoom zoom

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •