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Thread: Signs of declining economic security

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by windowdressing View Post
    Oh, these are equivalents?
    Those are examples of the other side accusing the other falsely of something. Again, they are different in nature, but the tactic is the same, try and discredit the opponent through lies.

    The right isn't going after Obama because he is black, they are going after him because he is ideology different than they are. Same as when the left did that to Bush. Is it right to do that? Of course not, but racism is not in play for the majority.

    Do you REALLY think that the right would do anything differently if Obama was white? No, they wouldn't. Race has nothing to do with this as a whole. Yes, there are some that don't like Obama because he is black, they are a minority.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNextEra View Post
    Those are examples of the other side accusing the other falsely of something. Again, they are different in nature, but the tactic is the same, try and discredit the opponent through lies.

    The right isn't going after Obama because he is black, they are going after him because he is ideology different than they are. Same as when the left did that to Bush. Is it right to do that? Of course not, but racism is not in play for the majority.

    Do you REALLY think that the right would do anything differently if Obama was white? No, they wouldn't. Race has nothing to do with this as a whole. Yes, there are some that don't like Obama because he is black, they are a minority.
    as I said, Libetarians and race ... and Ron Paul's newsletters weren't racist ... I really do have to go ... stay in that bubble ... it's more confusing out here and not as nice ... take care ...

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by windowdressing View Post
    as I said, Libetarians and race ... and Ron Paul's newsletters weren't racist ... I really do have to go ... stay in that bubble ... it's more confusing out here and not as nice ... take care ...
    Yet again, do you think the GOP would go "lock in step" with Obama on Obamacare if he were white? Do you think they would go along with all of Obama's decisions if he were white? Do you think the GOP would not smear Obama if he were white?

    If you think so, I'd love to hear your reasoning on that.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNextEra View Post
    Yet again, do you think the GOP would go "lock in step" with Obama on Obamacare if he were white? Do you think they would go along with all of Obama's decisions if he were white? Do you think the GOP would not smear Obama if he were white?

    If you think so, I'd love to hear your reasoning on that.
    I will say this, the rhetoric would have been different. No birther stuff. No shouting lie in congress. It would have been along the lines of what we usually see. Things have been over the top concerning Obama. So, while I agree with your that most are not racist, there has been a racist element in all lot this.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    <

    No my point is, the overseers of government is the politicians. But in the US and ALL other countries, it is the politicians that are the problem and do not do their jobs and instead use government as an ATM for them and their financial backers. Hence the problem is not government but the elected politicians and the system it self.
    Corrected it for you.
    "He who does not think himself worth saving from poverty and ignorance by his own efforts, will hardly be thought worth the efforts of anybody else." -- Frederick Douglass, Self-Made Men (1872)
    "Fly-over" country voted, and The Donald is now POTUS.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    I will say this, the rhetoric would have been different. No birther stuff. No shouting lie in congress. It would have been along the lines of what we usually see. Things have been over the top concerning Obama. So, while I agree with your that most are not racist, there has been a racist element in all lot this.
    That wasn't racist, wtf are you talking about? No one ever questioned Jesse Jackson when he ran.
    "He who does not think himself worth saving from poverty and ignorance by his own efforts, will hardly be thought worth the efforts of anybody else." -- Frederick Douglass, Self-Made Men (1872)
    "Fly-over" country voted, and The Donald is now POTUS.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by American View Post
    That wasn't racist, wtf are you talking about? No one ever questioned Jesse Jackson when he ran.
    Not about birth, but certainly many over the top allegations. Also, Jessie really never came close to winning, so it wasn't so threatening.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    The challenges related to economic security are, in part, the result of broad forces and developments that have largely reshaped the economic realm. That process is continuing.

    A few decades ago, the economic realm was more static. Limitations in flows of trade, capital, and information served as “speed bumps” that tended to dampen the rate at which societies and economies changed. Today, that is no longer the case. Trade liberalization grants access to world-class products in most of the world’s economies. Technological advances and reduction in illiberal capital regimes have made it possible for capital to flow rapidly across national boundaries throughout most of the world where the safety-returns balance is most attractive. Technology has decimated barriers that once impeded the flow of ideas, now allowing societies in much of the world to leverage those ideas in myriad fields in building competitive firms, industries, and economies.

    That landscape now requires emphasis on knowledge, flexibility, and continual improvement and innovation. In a growing level of occupations, the need for competence has been replaced by the need for excellence. What one knows today is less important than whether one will know what is needed for tomorrow. Firms increasingly look to their employees not as inputs for production, but as sources of human capital that could allow them to develop difficult- or costly-to-imitate processes that are essential to building sustainable competitive advantages. To gain security, employees increasingly need to adapt and re-adapt their skills and expand their knowledge. Otherwise, their value in the human capital framework can only depreciate relative that of their international counterparts in a dynamic world where the education/skills disparities have been closing fast.

    The transition from yesterday’s economy to today’s economy and that of the foreseeable future is not easy. That transition has been made more difficult from a lack of a “big picture” approach in which investment has often been viewed by policy makers as just another discretionary expense. The difference is that a dollar invested yields future returns while a dollar spent on an expense does not.

    In 2009, a National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Working Paper asked whether the U.S. is losing its preeminence in higher education. The paper noted that scientific research in Europe and East Asia has been expanding rapidly since the 1980s (not a bad thing). At the same time, it observed that U.S. publication rates since the 1990s had been slowing and that slowdown could not simply be attributed to trends in Europe and East Asia. Instead, the paper revealed that the slowdown resulted from underinvestment in public institutions. The slowdown of funding for research translated into falling research output in public universities, with many of those institutions seeing their research output tumble into the middle- and bottom-40% of their disciplines.

    A 2012 NBER Working Paper observed a slowdown in U.S. innovation. The paper attributed that development to demography (aging U.S. population), education (stagnant outcomes), inequality, among other factors. Based on its findings, the paper warned that “future growth in consumption per capita for the bottom 99 percent of the income distribution could fall below 0.5 percent per year for an extended period of decades.” The results of the AP survey offer a hint of that outcome.

    There are no quick fixes. Moreover, the President’s planned address on a new "grand bargain" seeks, in part, to emphasize increased funding for community colleges to reduce barriers to opportunity. Unfortunately, the plan as it has been reported, appears poised to fall far short of what is needed.

    First, even as community colleges have a role to play, one must look beyond technical training. Their most productive role in a long-term investment strategy might well entail preparing their students for 4-year and advanced degrees. BLS employment data and Census incomes data show that technical training is not where the greatest job and income security lie. The real value added depends more and more on advanced knowledge far more than it does technical training. Second, without an aggressive approach to increase the value added from elementary and secondary educations (knowledge, progress, timely graduation), students will not be academically-ready for college curricula, which also needs to grow more demanding. Third, a national program would need to be sustained with progress informed by critical indicators and be accompanied by an objective process to make adjustments as needed.

    If news reports are accurate, what is being proposed is largely yet another minimalist “plan du jour.” The description suggests that it is largely tactical and reactive. Instead, the nation needs an economic and investment strategy that is coherent, proactive, and strategic. The strategy needs to address how the nation will dramatically expand its pool of knowledge workers in particular, and broaden its pool of human capital in general.

    To be sure, government can’t do everything, nor should it. Much of what is required will depend on the private sector. Indeed, the private sector should largely handle technical training. Government should focus its investments on developing high-skilled labor where overall returns would be maximized.

    In that context, government needs to give much greater attention to the future value its investments can yield. All expenditures are not created equal. A coherent, proactive, and strategic framework can help it do so. A tactical and reactive approach will likely continue to yield low returns at high cost with little tangible contribution toward addressing the nation’s big challenges.
    Last edited by donsutherland1; 07-30-13 at 12:40 PM.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNextEra View Post
    There is no Bush hatred in my comments,
    only facts. Under Bush the economy got worse than when Clinton was president. Just as with Obama, the economy has gotten worse than Bush. I've criticzed Obama plenty.

    The average "Obama" voter is no different than the average "GOP" voter. Both sides think "their" guys are the solution. They aren't, they are the problem.
    Wrong....the Clinton economy was a economy based on bubbles as he set the stage for the Sub-Prime Collapse through his corrupt appointments and his mandates that lowered standards that had been in place for decades.

    Trust me, you have no bussines critiquing the average voter in this Country let alone the average GOP voter.

    All you've got is a opinion based on a talking points and I have yet to see you post any evidence to the contrary.

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    Re: Signs of declining economic security

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    Not about birth, but certainly many over the top allegations. Also, Jessie really never came close to winning, so it wasn't so threatening.
    Come on, if it was a racist tactic, it would have been used immediately whether he was winning or not. Anyway, I don't racism in this. The guy came out of nowhere with a tiny resume compared to most presidential candidates. If it weren't for the fawning of the press he may never had made it. He was up against Hillary you know?
    "He who does not think himself worth saving from poverty and ignorance by his own efforts, will hardly be thought worth the efforts of anybody else." -- Frederick Douglass, Self-Made Men (1872)
    "Fly-over" country voted, and The Donald is now POTUS.

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