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Thread: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

  1. #21
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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    There are so many laws on the books no one can even count them. Why do we need to judge Congress by how many new ones they pass?

    "There is no one in the United States over the age of 18 who cannot be indicted for some federal crime," said John Baker, a retired Louisiana State University law professor who has also tried counting the number of new federal crimes created in recent years. "That is not an exaggeration."

    The Many Failed Efforts to Count Nation's Federal Criminal Laws - WSJ.com
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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    15 bills the House passed, but Reid refuses to schedule for votes

    Here are the 15 bills sitting on Harry Reid's desk because he can't bring himself to schedule them for a vote in the Senate. God forbid they should pass... that would put Obama in the untenable position of either signing REPUBLICAN legislation (can't have that, now can we?) or vetoing REPUBLICAN measures that could help to improve the jobs picture in this country. Either way, Obama would lose. The fact that these measures would help this country, well, who really gives a ****, right?


    H.R. 872, the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act

    The bill would amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) to clarify that the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a state may not require a permit under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act for the application of pesticides regulated under FIFRA. The Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act would ensure that pesticide users are not faced with unnecessary regulations that harm job growth.
    H.R. 910, the Energy Tax Prevention Act

    The bill would strip the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of its ability to use the Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases. Without this legislation, the agency will continue with its plan to implement burdensome new rules and regulations on American businesses that will have a significant negative impact on America’s economy while having virtually no positive impact on global temperatures.
    H. J. Res. 37, Disapproval of FCC’s Net Neutrality Act

    H.J. Res 37 would prohibit the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from imposing net neutrality regulations on Internet providers. Net neutrality is likely to cripple competition, restrict innovation, reduce employment and raise costs for all consumers—all of which would only exacerbate the current economic downturn. These job-killing regulations would involve significant new controls on the Internet that would have significant implications for investing in innovation and broadband deployment.

    H.R. 2018, the Clean Water Cooperative Federalism Act

    The bill would amend the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to preserve the authority of each State to make determinations relating to the State's water quality standards. This would reduce the federal government’s power over individual state’s water quality standards to help increase job growth.
    H.R. 1315, Consumer Financial Protection & Soundness Improvement Act

    This bill is will amend the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act to strengthen the review authority of the Financial Stability Oversight Council of regulations issued by the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. The increased accountability will help to prevent harmful job-killing regulations.
    H.R. 2587, Protecting Jobs from Government Interference Act

    The bill would prohibit the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) from ordering any employer to close, relocate or transfer employment under any circumstance. Federal bureaucrats should not be reversing the business decisions of private employers. Washington already has too many harmful regulations that hurt job growth. The Protecting Jobs from Government Interference Act would help ensure that the government agency does not over step their bounds by dictating decisions made by private sector companies.
    H.R. 2401, Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation (TRAIN ACT)

    The TRAIN Act would establish an 11-member committee, chaired by the Department of Commerce, to analyze the impacts of a number of major Environment Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. The agency often understates the negative impact its rules will have on jobs and energy prices. This is why we need a committee whose sole purpose is to analyze the cumulative impacts of EPA regulations. The TRAIN Act would push back against the EPA's unconstitutional, outrageous rules and regulations that raise energy prices for consumers, destroy jobs and increase our dependence on foreign sources of energy.
    H.R. 2681, Cement Sector Regulatory Relief Act

    The bill would prohibit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations from coming into effect which would place burdensome regulations on the cement industry. The cement industry estimates that the rule could destroy as many as 4,000 jobs. The Cement Sector Regulatory Relief Act would stop the unnecessary cement MACT rule which will cost thousands of jobs and hamper economic growth.
    H.R. 2250, EPA Regulatory Relief Act

    The bill would help to curtail the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Boiler MACT regulations on boilers and industrial incinerators. The Council of Industrial Boiler Owners estimates that the regulations will cost 244,000 jobs. The EPA Regulatory Relief Act would help to roll back unreasonable regulations and save thousands of American jobs
    .

    H.R. 2273, Coal Residuals Reuse and Management Act

    The bill would prohibit the EPA from regulating coal ash as a toxic waste in any state which prefers to develop its own plans in that regard. This bill would further slow the EPA’s Regulatory Trainwreck and could save thousands of jobs in coal-rich states such as West Virginia and Ohio.
    H.R. 1230, Restarting American Offshore Leasing Now Act

    The Restarting American Offshore Leasing Now Act (H.R. 1230) would establish statutory deadlines for sales of certain oil and gas leases in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). CBO estimates that enacting this legislation would reduce net direct spending by $25 million over the 2011-2016 period and about $40 million over the 2011-2021 period. Restarting offshore leasing will help restore thousands of jobs.
    H.R. 1229, Putting the Gulf of Mexico Back to Work Act

    The bill would amend the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to facilitate the production of American energy resources from the Gulf of Mexico. The Obama administration has delayed or canceled offshore lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico. The bill would jump start offshore oil drilling by implementing a 30-day deadline in which the secretary of the U.S. Interior Department would have to make a decision on the Gulf of Mexico drilling permit applications. The bill would likely help to create tens of thousands of jobs and strengthen the economy.
    H.R. 1231, Reversing President Obama’s Offshore Moratorium Act

    The bill would reverse President Obama's Offshore Moratorium Act and amend the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to require that each 5-year offshore oil and gas leasing program offer leasing in the areas with the most prospective oil and gas resources and would establish a domestic oil and natural gas production goal. Reversing the offshore moratoriums will help restore thousands of jobs.
    H.R. 2021, the Jobs and Energy Permitting Act of 2011

    The bill would eliminate needless permitting delays that have stalled important energy production opportunities off the coast of Alaska. Rather than having exploration air permits repeatedly approved and rescinded by the agency and its review board, the EPA will be required to take final action – granting or denying a permit – within six months. The Jobs and Energy Permitting Act of 2011 would speed up the permit process to help create jobs.
    H.R. 1938, North American-Made Energy Security Act

    The bill would require the President to issue a final order granting or denying the Presidential Permit for Keystone XL 30 days after the issuance of the final environmental impact statement, but in no event later than November 1, 2011. A Canadian pipeline company, TransCanada, has long sought to increase the capacity of its Keystone pipeline system in order to bring more Canadian crude oil to American refineries. The North American-Made Energy Security Act would boost jobs and lower the price of gasoline for all Americans
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    Last edited by trfjr; 07-11-13 at 11:15 AM.

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by Unitedwestand13 View Post
    it will be too late to fix the problems now if we wait until the next election.

    THis gridlock has to stop. we have to convince the congress we have now to fix the problems we have now.
    I love gridlock. It is the only thing we have left to protect ourselves from government since we can't have single term limits. I can only hope the gridlock gets worse. That last place you want problems fixed is the US Congress.

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by Heebie Jeebie View Post
    There are so many laws on the books no one can even count them. Why do we need to judge Congress by how many new ones they pass?

    "There is no one in the United States over the age of 18 who cannot be indicted for some federal crime," said John Baker, a retired Louisiana State University law professor who has also tried counting the number of new federal crimes created in recent years. "That is not an exaggeration."

    The Many Failed Efforts to Count Nation's Federal Criminal Laws - WSJ.com
    I'm sure I break laws every day. I just don't know which ones. I'm long past caring.

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    I have to agree with others on several points.

    Grid lock is not necessarily bad, as it protects us from one side passing burdensome, unnecessary and damaging laws. The Dems have not, since first taking control of the Senate in 2007, offered up a single law that would help job growth and reduce spending debt in any realistic fashion. They have however proposed many, many laws that would damage business and growth. We have no real idea of what the Reps would/could do as they are hampered by trying to stave off the lunatic fringe of the left while showing signs of severe fracturing within their own ranks.

    It is not only the fault of the people in congress, it is more the fault of the people who put them in congress. What we are seeing is the inevitable results of open representative democracy when the ignorant, stupid and selfish are given the ability to vote their ignorance, stupidity and selfishness with absolutely no balance to their power.
    Only a fool measures equality by results and not opportunities.

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Invisible View Post
    Are you seriously asking what the dysfunctional institution is going to do to fix itself? How does that make any sense?
    i know one way the senate can fix itself.

    implement filibuster reform.

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by trfjr View Post
    15 bills the House passed, but Reid refuses to schedule for votes

    Here are the 15 bills sitting on Harry Reid's desk because he can't bring himself to schedule them for a vote in the Senate. God forbid they should pass... that would put Obama in the untenable position of either signing REPUBLICAN legislation (can't have that, now can we?) or vetoing REPUBLICAN measures that could help to improve the jobs picture in this country. Either way, Obama would lose. The fact that these measures would help this country, well, who really gives a ****, right?



















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    many of those bills i notice attack EPA regulations, and the frank-dodd act.

    in other words, gut government protections and let companys run wild. i think the deepwater horrizon disaster is enough proof to keep oil company regulations up to date.

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by Unitedwestand13 View Post
    a snapshot of how gridlocked our congress has become

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/08/us...2&ref=politics



    15 laws. 15 laws in 2013 so far compared to the 23 laws passed at this same point in time in 2011.



    WHAT THE IS THIS CONGRESS DOING TO FIX THIS!!!!!!! box
    Passing laws should not be the measure of success.
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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by Unitedwestand13 View Post
    i know one way the senate can fix itself.

    implement filibuster reform.
    And how is the dysfunctional Senate going to agree on how to implement filibuster reform?
    "And in the end, we were all just humans, drunk on the idea that love, only love, could heal our brokenness."

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    Re: New York times times: in congress gridlock and harsh consequnces

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Invisible View Post
    And how is the dysfunctional Senate going to agree on how to implement filibuster reform?
    I'd like to see them launch a 15 year filibuster. That would leave us alone for at least a while.

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