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Thread: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the Republican Party's strategy of gaining political support or winning elections in the Southern United States by appealing to racism against African Americans.[1][2][3][4][5]

    Though the "Solid South" had been a longtime Democratic Party stronghold due to the Democratic Party's defense of slavery before the American Civil War and segregation for a century thereafter, many white Southern Democrats stopped supporting the party following the civil rights plank of the Democratic campaign in 1948 (triggering the Dixiecrats), the African-American Civil Rights Movement, the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, and desegregation.

    The strategy was first adopted under future Republican President Richard Nixon and Republican Senator Barry Goldwater[6][7] in the late 1960s.[8] The strategy was successful in many regards. It contributed to the electoral realignment of Southern states to the Republican Party, but at the expense of losing more than 90 percent of black voters to the Democratic Party. As the twentieth century came to a close, the Republican Party began trying to appeal again to black voters, though with little success.[8]

    Although the phrase "Southern strategy" is often attributed to Nixon's political strategist Kevin Phillips, he did not originate it,[9] but merely popularized it.[10] In an interview included in a 1970 New York Times article, he touched on its essence:

    From now on, the Republicans are never going to get more than 10 to 20 percent of the Negro vote and they don't need any more than that...but Republicans would be shortsighted if they weakened enforcement of the Voting Rights Act. The more Negroes who register as Democrats in the South, the sooner the Negrophobe whites will quit the Democrats and become Republicans. That's where the votes are. Without that prodding from the blacks, the whites will backslide into their old comfortable arrangement with the local Democrats.[2]
    While Phillips sought to polarize ethnic voting in general, and not just to win the white South, the South was by far the biggest prize yielded by his approach. Its success began at the presidential level, gradually trickling down to statewide offices, the Senate, and the House, as some legacy segregationist Democrats retired or switched to the GOP. In addition, the Republican Party worked for years to develop grassroots political organizations across the South, supporting candidates for local school boards and offices.......

    In 1980, Republican candidate Ronald Reagan's proclaiming "I believe in states' rights" at his first Southern campaign stop was cited as evidence that the Republican Party was building upon the Southern strategy again.[5][12] Reagan launched his campaign at the Neshoba County Fair[13] near Philadelphia, Mississippi, the county where the three civil rights workers were murdered during 1964's Freedom Summer......
    Bob Herbert, a New York Times columnist, reported a 1981 interview with Lee Atwater, published in Southern Politics in the 1990s by Alexander P. Lamis, in which Lee Atwater discussed politics in the South:

    Questioner: But the fact is, isn't it, that Reagan does get to the Wallace voter and to the racist side of the Wallace voter by doing away with legal services, by cutting down on food stamps?

    Atwater: You start out in 1954 by saying, "Nigger, nigger, nigger." By 1968 you can't say "nigger" — that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states' rights and all that stuff. You're getting so abstract now [that] you're talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you're talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is [that] blacks get hurt worse than whites. And subconsciously maybe that is part of it. I'm not saying that. But I'm saying that if it is getting that abstract, and that coded, that we are doing away with the racial problem one way or the other. You follow me — because obviously sitting around saying, "We want to cut this," is much more abstract than even the busing thing, and a hell of a lot more abstract than "Nigger, nigger."[4]

    Herbert wrote in the same column, "The truth is that there was very little that was subconscious about the G.O.P.'s relentless appeal to racist whites. Tired of losing elections, it saw an opportunity to renew itself by opening its arms wide to white voters who could never forgive the Democratic Party for its support of civil rights and voting rights for blacks."[1]
    Southern strategy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the Republican Party's strategy of gaining political support or winning elections in the Southern United States by appealing to racism against African Americans.[1][2][3][4][5]

    Though the "Solid South" had been a longtime Democratic Party stronghold due to the Democratic Party's defense of slavery before the American Civil War and segregation for a century thereafter, many white Southern Democrats stopped supporting the party following the civil rights plank of the Democratic campaign in 1948 (triggering the Dixiecrats), the African-American Civil Rights Movement, the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, and desegregation.

    The strategy was first adopted under future Republican President Richard Nixon and Republican Senator Barry Goldwater[6][7] in the late 1960s.[8] The strategy was successful in many regards. It contributed to the electoral realignment of Southern states to the Republican Party, but at the expense of losing more than 90 percent of black voters to the Democratic Party. As the twentieth century came to a close, the Republican Party began trying to appeal again to black voters, though with little success.[8]

    Although the phrase "Southern strategy" is often attributed to Nixon's political strategist Kevin Phillips, he did not originate it,[9] but merely popularized it.[10] In an interview included in a 1970 New York Times article, he touched on its essence:

    From now on, the Republicans are never going to get more than 10 to 20 percent of the Negro vote and they don't need any more than that...but Republicans would be shortsighted if they weakened enforcement of the Voting Rights Act. The more Negroes who register as Democrats in the South, the sooner the Negrophobe whites will quit the Democrats and become Republicans. That's where the votes are. Without that prodding from the blacks, the whites will backslide into their old comfortable arrangement with the local Democrats.[2]
    While Phillips sought to polarize ethnic voting in general, and not just to win the white South, the South was by far the biggest prize yielded by his approach. Its success began at the presidential level, gradually trickling down to statewide offices, the Senate, and the House, as some legacy segregationist Democrats retired or switched to the GOP. In addition, the Republican Party worked for years to develop grassroots political organizations across the South, supporting candidates for local school boards and offices.......

    In 1980, Republican candidate Ronald Reagan's proclaiming "I believe in states' rights" at his first Southern campaign stop was cited as evidence that the Republican Party was building upon the Southern strategy again.[5][12] Reagan launched his campaign at the Neshoba County Fair[13] near Philadelphia, Mississippi, the county where the three civil rights workers were murdered during 1964's Freedom Summer......
    Bob Herbert, a New York Times columnist, reported a 1981 interview with Lee Atwater, published in Southern Politics in the 1990s by Alexander P. Lamis, in which Lee Atwater discussed politics in the South:

    Questioner: But the fact is, isn't it, that Reagan does get to the Wallace voter and to the racist side of the Wallace voter by doing away with legal services, by cutting down on food stamps?

    Atwater: You start out in 1954 by saying, "Nigger, nigger, nigger." By 1968 you can't say "nigger" — that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states' rights and all that stuff. You're getting so abstract now [that] you're talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you're talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is [that] blacks get hurt worse than whites. And subconsciously maybe that is part of it. I'm not saying that. But I'm saying that if it is getting that abstract, and that coded, that we are doing away with the racial problem one way or the other. You follow me — because obviously sitting around saying, "We want to cut this," is much more abstract than even the busing thing, and a hell of a lot more abstract than "Nigger, nigger."[4]

    Herbert wrote in the same column, "The truth is that there was very little that was subconscious about the G.O.P.'s relentless appeal to racist whites. Tired of losing elections, it saw an opportunity to renew itself by opening its arms wide to white voters who could never forgive the Democratic Party for its support of civil rights and voting rights for blacks."[1]
    Southern strategy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    And yet, in 1968, as George Wallace's poll numbers declined late in the Presidential race, Wallace's voters went to Humphrey, not Nixon.
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    the Libs hate Clarence Thomas because he is a black man that doesn't tow the "party line", that he should "think like a black man".

    It makes them crazy when latinos, blacks or women, take typically conservative stands on a subject. That is simply not politically correct.

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    Then I guess Jesse Helms and Strom Thurmond must typify the Republicans.
    Although some of their positions were not to be admired neither were ever members of the KKK. Also the Republican Party was the party of freedom for minorities, despite members like Jesse Helms.

    Here's Bill Clinton. Clinton Defends Byrd's KKK Ties: "He Was Trying To Get Elected"

    Well Robert Byrd had more than a 'fleerting' interest in the KKK. He arose to become a "Kleagle", responsible for enlisting other bigots (Democrats) into his organization.

    "The Klan is needed today as never before and I am anxious to see its rebirth here in West Virginia. It is necessary that the order be promoted immediately and in every state in the Union". Naturally he voted against both Thurgood |Marshall and Clarence Thomas.

    Of course Strom Thurmond was a Democrat when he voted against the Civil Rights Act, the same Act Robert Byrd filibustered.

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the Republican Party's strategy of gaining political support or winning elections in the Southern United States by appealing to racism against African Americans.[1][2][3][4][5]
    Here are the facts, not hearsay

    The Nixon years witnessed the first large-scale integration of public schools in the South.[174] Nixon sought a middle way between the segregationist Wallace and liberal Democrats, whose support of integration was alienating some Southern whites.[175] Hopeful of doing well in the South in 1972, he sought to dispose of desegregation as a political issue before then. Soon after his inauguration, he appointed Vice President Agnew to lead a task force, which worked with local leaders—both white and black—to determine how to integrate local schools. Agnew had little interest in the work, and most of it was done by Labor Secretary George Shultz. Federal aid was available, and a meeting with President Nixon was a possible reward for compliant committees. By September 1970, less than ten percent of black children were attending segregated schools. By 1971, however, tensions over desegregation surfaced in Northern cities, with angry protests over the busing of children to schools outside their neighborhood to achieve racial balance. Nixon opposed busing personally but enforced court orders requiring its use.[176]

    In addition to desegregating public schools, Nixon implemented the Philadelphia Plan in 1970—the first significant federal affirmative action program.[177] He also endorsed the Equal Rights Amendment after it passed both houses of Congress in 1972 and went to the states for ratification.[178] Nixon had campaigned as an ERA supporter in 1968, though feminists criticized him for doing little to help the ERA or their cause after his election. Nevertheless, he appointed more women to administration positions than Lyndon Johnson had.[179]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Nixon

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hays View Post
    And yet, in 1968, as George Wallace's poll numbers declined late in the Presidential race, Wallace's voters went to Humphrey, not Nixon.
    Of course they would. Why would the Democrats vote for a Republican?

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    Re: Democratic lawmaker hits justice as ‘Uncle Thomas’

    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    Looks like it will prevent possible voter fraud. That's a good thing.


    Like there is a whole lot of voter fraud these days--another conservative myth.....

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