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Thread: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

  1. #101
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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies


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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    That has nothing to do with anything I've ever said. I'll take that to be your concession post.

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    Is prof still talking about politics instead of operations? how weird
    The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected.
    -GK Chesterton

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    Quote Originally Posted by OldWorldOrder View Post
    Is prof still talking about politics instead of operations? how weird
    Honestly, I have no idea what prof is trying to talk about, aside from continuously posting links. I'm not sure if he/she even knows at this point.

    This a pretty simple case. Government is collecting data which is being provided to them. It is not illegal, even though myself and other people have been desiring it to be so for over a decade.

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    cherry picking:

    obama in san jose friday "argued that some have overstated the impact of the programs"

    obama in january 08: "violation of the basic civil liberties of the american people"

    links above

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    lol, he keeps talking about obama or something?
    The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected.
    -GK Chesterton

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    ops:

    The National Security Agency has obtained direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other US internet giants, according to a top secret document obtained by the Guardian.

    The NSA access is part of a previously undisclosed program called Prism, which allows officials to collect material including search history, the content of emails, file transfers and live chats, the document says.

    The Guardian has verified the authenticity of the document, a 41-slide PowerPoint presentation classified as top secret with no distribution to foreign allies which was apparently used to train intelligence operatives on the capabilities of the program. The document claims "collection directly from the servers" of major US service providers.

    Although the presentation claims the program is run with the assistance of the companies, all those who responded to a Guardian request for comment on Thursday denied knowledge of any such program.

    Several senior tech executives insisted that they had no knowledge of Prism or of any similar scheme. They said they would never have been involved in such a program. "If they are doing this, they are doing it without our knowledge," one said.

    An Apple spokesman said it had "never heard" of Prism.

    The program facilitates extensive, in-depth surveillance on live communications and stored information. The law allows for the targeting of any customers of participating firms who live outside the US, or those Americans whose communications include people outside the US.

    It also opens the possibility of communications made entirely within the US being collected without warrants.

    The participation of the internet companies in Prism will add to the debate, ignited by the Verizon revelation, about the scale of surveillance by the intelligence services. Unlike the collection of those call records, this surveillance can include the content of communications and not just the metadata.

    Companies are legally obliged to comply with requests for users' communications under US law, but the Prism program allows the intelligence services direct access to the companies' servers. The NSA document notes the operations have "assistance of communications providers in the US".

    When the FAA was first enacted, defenders of the statute argued that a significant check on abuse would be the NSA's inability to obtain electronic communications without the consent of the telecom and internet companies that control the data. But the Prism program renders that consent unnecessary, as it allows the agency to directly and unilaterally seize the communications off the companies' servers.

    A chart prepared by the NSA, contained within the top-secret document obtained by the Guardian, underscores the breadth of the data it is able to obtain: email, video and voice chat, videos, photos, voice-over-IP (Skype, for example) chats, file transfers, social networking details, and more.

    The document is recent, dating to April 2013. Such a leak is extremely rare in the history of the NSA, which prides itself on maintaining a high level of secrecy.

    The Prism program allows the NSA, the world's largest surveillance organisation, to obtain targeted communications without having to request them from the service providers and without having to obtain individual court orders.

    With this program, the NSA is able to reach directly into the servers of the participating companies and obtain both stored communications as well as perform real-time collection on targeted users.

    The presentation claims Prism was introduced to overcome what the NSA regarded as shortcomings of Fisa warrants in tracking suspected foreign terrorists. It noted that the US has a "home-field advantage" due to housing much of the internet's architecture. But the presentation claimed "Fisa constraints restricted our home-field advantage" because Fisa required individual warrants and confirmations that both the sender and receiver of a communication were outside the US.

    "Fisa was broken because it provided privacy protections to people who were not entitled to them," the presentation claimed. "It took a Fisa court order to collect on foreigners overseas who were communicating with other foreigners overseas simply because the government was collecting off a wire in the United States. There were too many email accounts to be practical to seek Fisas for all."

    The new measures introduced in the FAA redefines "electronic surveillance" to exclude anyone "reasonably believed" to be outside the USA a technical change which reduces the bar to initiating surveillance.

    The act also gives the director of national intelligence and the attorney general power to permit obtaining intelligence information, and indemnifies internet companies against any actions arising as a result of co-operating with authorities' requests.

    In short, where previously the NSA needed individual authorisations, and confirmation that all parties were outside the USA, they now need only reasonable suspicion that one of the parties was outside the country at the time of the records were collected by the NSA.

    It boasts of what it calls "strong growth" in its use of the Prism program to obtain communications. The document highlights the number of obtained communications increased in 2012 by 248% for Skype leading the notes to remark there was "exponential growth in Skype reporting; looks like the word is getting out about our capability against Skype". There was also a 131% increase in requests for Facebook data, and 63% for Google.

    The NSA document indicates that it is planning to add Dropbox as a PRISM provider. The agency also seeks, in its words, to "expand collection services from existing providers".

    Senator Christopher Coons of Delaware specifically warned that the secrecy surrounding the various surveillance programs meant there was no way to know if safeguards within the act were working.

    "The problem is: we here in the Senate and the citizens we represent don't know how well any of these safeguards actually work," he said.

    "The law doesn't forbid purely domestic information from being collected. We know that at least one Fisa court has ruled that the surveillance program violated the law. Why? Those who know can't say and average Americans can't know."

    Other senators also raised concerns. Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon attempted, without success, to find out any information on how many phone calls or emails had been intercepted under the program.

    When the law was enacted, defenders of the FAA argued that a significant check on abuse would be the NSA's inability to obtain electronic communications without the consent of the telecom and internet companies that control the data. But the Prism program renders that consent unnecessary, as it allows the agency to directly and unilaterally seize the communications off the companies' servers.

    When the NSA reviews a communication it believes merits further investigation, it issues what it calls a "report". According to the NSA, "over 2,000 Prism-based reports" are now issued every month. There were 24,005 in 2012, a 27% increase on the previous year.

    Jameel Jaffer, director of the ACLU's Center for Democracy, that it was astonishing the NSA would even ask technology companies to grant direct access to user data.

    "It's shocking enough just that the NSA is asking companies to do this," he said. "The NSA is part of the military. The military has been granted unprecedented access to civilian communications.

    "This is unprecedented militarisation of domestic communications infrastructure. That's profoundly troubling to anyone who is concerned about that separation."
    the guardian above

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    Quote Originally Posted by OldWorldOrder View Post
    lol, he keeps talking about obama or something?
    He just keeps regurgitating the same thing over and over, I suppose ascribing to the idea if you say something lacking in logic and/or intelligence enough times, people will eventually believe it.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Prof View Post
    ops:



    the guardian above
    Again, understand technology...

    An Apple spokesman said it had "never heard" of Prism.

    the Prism program allows the intelligence services direct access to the companies' servers.
    Impossible. A government law/mandate/operation doesn't magically open holes in a company's security. They have to be allowed in. Which, coincidentally, is exactly what was said:

    The NSA document notes the operations have "assistance of communications providers in the US".
    Even by your own post, I have been proven correct. Now, this is where you post the same irrelevant article you've already posted again.

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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    "the prism program allows the intelligence services direct access to the companies' servers"

    link above

  10. #110
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    Re: U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies

    Quote Originally Posted by OldWorldOrder View Post
    You said the system was corrupted by money and power, did you not?
    I was referring to the overall system... your political system

    The system is trying to prevent attacks. I didn't need to twist anything...
    Yes you did.... but lets put it down to the language barrier.

    Should there be a referendum on it? I'm reminded of the failure of collective security in the 1930s, writ small: collective security internationally fails because not everyone feels as threatened by certain things and thus doesn't respond equally. Likewise, of course, the average person doesn't feel much responsibility for preventing attacks; they assume someone else will do that for them. That's why that "someone else" should be involved in the decision making regarding that stuff, not the average person.
    Not the point... point is that complaining about Obama only while ignoring those that actually approved the system is pathetic. I agree we elected our politicians to make the hard calls, but that also means that we cant come and complain after the fact.. especially when it has been known for so long that it was happening.
    PeteEU

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