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Thread: American soldier pleads guilty in Afghan massacre, describes killings Read more: htt

  1. #11
    Sage

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    Re: American soldier pleads guilty in Afghan massacre, describes killings Read more:

    obama in berlin: an important first step...

    today:

    AP: Karzai backs out of peace talks

    are you sure this white house knows what it's doing

    ap adds: "also tuesday, five afghan police officers were killed at a security outpost in helmand province by five of their comrades, officials said, the latest in a string of so-called 'insider attacks' that have shaken the confidence of the nascent afghan security forces"

  2. #12
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    Re: American soldier pleads guilty in Afghan massacre, describes killings Read more:

    Established precedent says neither.

    Lt William Calley did basically the same thing in Vietnam...he ordered the execution 104 civilians...he said he did what he was ordered to do by Capt Medina to..."kill the enemy", an order corroborated by 21 members of Charlie Co...that's what he did...he got a limited Presidential Pardon from Nixon...he served 3 1/2 years of house arrest.

    BTW: The execution of Gen Yama****a after WWII established the following:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomoyuki_Yama****a

    "The U.S. Supreme Court has never overruled its 1946 Yama****a decision. The precedent the decision established was that a commander can be held accountable before the law for the crimes committed by his troops even if he did not order them, did not stand by to allow them, or possibly even know about them or have the means to stop them.
    This doctrine of command accountability has been added to the Geneva Conventions and was applied to dozens of trials in the international tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. It has also been adopted by the International Criminal Court established in 2002."

    One could, using the above, argue responsibly that Gen John Allen should also have been tried and convicted of a war crime...Sgt. Robert Bales d was ultimately subordinate to Allen as were all combat troops in Afghanistan...

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