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Thread: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy Creek View Post
    There's no rehabilitation going on in prisons now. They lack funds to do it, is the excuse right before the state privatizes and then pays the private corporations three times the amount the state was paying to actually rehabilitate prisoners before the cutbacks.
    There is no rehabilitation.... If rehabilitation was the focus than why the hell do they give people 100 years in prison or 500 years in prison?

    Prison is a punishment - not a rehabilitation program.

    Besides, half the fools in prison are there for stupid reasons like drugs or were wrongfully convicted in the first place. So I don't understand how one "rehabilitates" an individual whos only crime is smoking/selling weed considering they're not criminals in the first place...

    The only people who have a chance at "rehabilitation" are young people (or first timers), however young people are only "rehabilitated" because prison is a "scared straight" place/program and they learn the risk of reward of a crime is not worth the time.

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by poweRob View Post
    Major kudos to the New Hampshire House. Hopefully this will push through the rest of the state government and then go viral to other states.


    House votes to prohibit prison privatization, bill moves to Senate for review

    The House on Thursday voted to forbid the executive branch from privatizing the state prison system, saying that to do so would shirk the state’s constitutional responsibility to rehabilitate inmates.

    The 197-136 roll call by the Democratic -controlled House sent House Bill 443 to the Senate, where Republicans hold a slim, 13-11 majority and the bill’s fate is uncertain, at best.

    I never heard much from the pro-side on this issue.

    What are the supposed benefits besides immediate cost savings?

    PS Rob, how do you feel about the effect prison guard unions in California had on issues like three strikes, strict sentencing guidelines, and the decriminalization of soft drugs? Honestly many of the same issues that have been made about private prisons seem to often apply to strong public unions

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Nick View Post
    I agree with you but prison is not a "rehabilitation center" it's punishment. If it wasn't people wouldn't use language like "you need to pay your debt to society."
    That is what it is today, mostly just punishment, and it is not working. "Prisons" should be places where criminals get the education, training and counseling to become good productive citizens when they are released.

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    That is what it is today, mostly just punishment, and it is not working. "Prisons" should be places where criminals get the education, training and counseling to become good productive citizens when they are released.
    I agree with you but you cant force someone to become educated or even change their ways - they have to make that decision for themselves...

    It's up to the individual to change (or rehabilitate) not the state/fed...

    There is nothing the state/fed can do to change someone.

    I think the biggest problem is that once a person spends 10-15+ years in prison they become "institutionalized" and are beyond "rehabilitation."

    Also, some people are just way beyond repair and they belong locked away for life...

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Chuckles View Post
    .....PS Rob, how do you feel about the effect prison guard unions in California had on issues like three strikes, strict sentencing guidelines, and the decriminalization of soft drugs? Honestly many of the same issues that have been made about private prisons seem to often apply to strong public unions
    I don't support taking away union's right to organize and present their views to legislators. We need politicians with the guts and integrity to prioritize the public interest over that of that one interest group. That requires informed voters who support politicians willing and able to do the right thing instead of pimping themselves out for a law enforcement endorsement.

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Nick View Post
    I agree with you but you cant force someone to become educated or even change their ways - they have to make that decision for themselves...

    It's up to the individual to change (or rehabilitate) not the state/fed...

    There is nothing the state/fed can do to change someone.

    I think the biggest problem is that once a person spends 10-15+ years in prison they become "institutionalized" and are beyond "rehabilitation."

    Also, some people are just way beyond repair and they belong locked away for life...
    I disagree, people can be made to change, it just takes significant time and effort. These efforts will take an investment, but it is one that will pay off in the future. Unfortunately, politicians don't care about the long-term since it doesn't help them get re-elected in two years. The public needs to create the pressure for this change. Our society has never made a full on commitment to rehabilitation because too many people are only interested in punishing criminals and don't consider what happens when they are released. Punishment should be a means to an end to the extent it is proven effective, punishment should not be an end to itself.

    The most important thing is to make sure that opportunities for education, training, work opportunities and counseling are available to all prisoners. That is not the current situation. We can also create powerful incentives for prisoners to take advantage of these opportunities such as improved living conditions or earlier release. We should also improve the supervision and assistance for released prisoners.

    My observation is that many convicts over 40 or so are tired of the criminal/prisoner life and are ready for a change. The handful that aren't may need more intensive mental health care to deal with their problems. Those that need to be incarcerated for public saftey should still be made as productive and harmless to other prisoners and guards as possible, with more of a mental hospital type of care than the brutality of prisons.

    Another thing that would help is to change the drug laws so that ex-cons don't get sent back to prison just because they smoked a joint while on probation.
    Last edited by Hard Truth; 03-24-13 at 03:46 PM.

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Chuckles View Post
    I never heard much from the pro-side on this issue.

    What are the supposed benefits besides immediate cost savings?

    PS Rob, how do you feel about the effect prison guard unions in California had on issues like three strikes, strict sentencing guidelines, and the decriminalization of soft drugs? Honestly many of the same issues that have been made about private prisons seem to often apply to strong public unions
    I honestly would have a hard time commenting on prision guard unions' effect on policy. I don't know much about their stances and whatnot. For myself, I'm against three strikes very much so and harsh punishments on pot and such.

    Thing is, with private prisons we still tax the public to pay for it and they throw in a profit margin on top of it all which always needs to grow.
    Quote Originally Posted by Moderate Right View Post
    The sad fact is that having a pedophile win is better than having a Democrat in office. I'm all for a solution where a Republican gets in that isn't Moore.

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by poweRob View Post
    I honestly would have a hard time commenting on prision guard unions' effect on policy. I don't know much about their stances and whatnot. For myself, I'm against three strikes very much so and harsh punishments on pot and such.

    Thing is, with private prisons we still tax the public to pay for it and they throw in a profit margin on top of it all which always needs to grow.
    Sorry, I should have been more clear. I'm generally against prison privitization. I was just interesting hearing if there was a more in depth argument for it beyond citing immediate cost savings.

    The reason I asked about public sector unions, is that I think they function differently than their cousins in the private sector, and the CCPOA has done many of the same things people are citing here as the potential dangers of privitization.

    Which makes sense, being that both have financial interest in maintaining a high number of incarcerations

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    I don't support taking away union's right to organize and present their views to legislators. We need politicians with the guts and integrity to prioritize the public interest over that of that one interest group. That requires informed voters who support politicians willing and able to do the right thing instead of pimping themselves out for a law enforcement endorsement.
    I generally don't have issues with unions. But its hard to argue that entities like the ccpoa should be aloud to function as they have in the recent past

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    Re: New Hampshire House Votes To Prohibit Private Prisons

    I am leery of something that would come between me and the justice system when I would be at my most vulnerable place in society.

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