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Thread: Gay marriage: MPs debate and vote, The Ayes have it!

  1. #111
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    Re: Gay marriage: MPs debate and vote, The Ayes have it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Omgitsme View Post
    How am I supposed to show if it exists or not if I dont even know what poll your exactly talking about? The burden of proof is on you here. You made the claim you present the poll or else you have nothing.

    Marriage is a word yes but its a word that describes an institution. And your saying that same sex couples cannot take part in it. So the only way you could possibly extend the same rights and privileges to same sex couples is by creating a separate institution such as civil unions. And separate is not equal so those institutions would be unequal even if they had the exact same rights and privileges.
    Correct. Under federal law, civil unions do not have the same privileges as marriages.

  2. #112
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    Re: Gay marriage: MPs debate and vote, The Ayes have it!

    Somebody call the Word Police and have them change these words back to their original meaning:

    ".....Awful—Originally meant "inspiring wonder (or fear)". Used originally as a shortening for "full of awe", in contemporary usage the word usually has negative meaning.

    Demagogue—Originally meant "a popular leader". It is from the Greek dēmagōgós "leader of the people", from dēmos "people" + agōgós "leading, guiding". Now the word has strong connotations of a politician who panders to emotions and prejudice.

    Egregious—Originally described something that was remarkably good. The word is from the Latin egregius "illustrious, select", literally, "standing out from the flock", which is from ex—"out of" + greg—(grex) "flock". Now it means something that is remarkably bad or flagrant.

    Guy—Guy Fawkes was the alleged leader of a plot to blow up the English Houses of Parliament on 5 Nov. 1605. The day was made a holiday, Guy Fawkes day, commemorated by parading and burning a ragged, grotesque effigy of Fawkes, known as a Guy. This led to the use of the word guy as a term for any "person of grotesque appearance" and then by the late 1800s—especially in America—for "any man", as in, e.g., "Some guy called for you." Over the 20th century, guy has replaced fellow in America, and, under the influence of American popular culture, has been gradually replacing fellow, bloke, chap and other such words throughout the rest of the English-speaking world. In the plural, it can refer to a mixture of genders (e.g., "Come on, you guys!" could be directed to a group of men and women).

    Gay—Originally meant (13th c.) "lighthearted", "joyous" or (14th c.) "bright and showy", it also came to mean "happy"; it acquired connotations of immorality as early as 1637, either sexual e.g., gay woman "prostitute", gay man "womanizer", gay house "brothel", or otherwise, e.g., gay dog "over-indulgent man" and gay deceiver "deceitful and lecherous". In America by 1897 the expression gay cat referred to a hobo, especially a younger hobo in the company of an older one; by 1935, it was used in prison slang for a homosexual boy; and by 1951 and clipped to gay, referred to homosexuals....

    Semantic change (also semantic shift or semantic progression) is the evolution of word usage — usually to the point that the modern meaning is radically different from the original usage. In diachronic (or historical) linguistics, semantic change is a change in one of the meanings of a word. Every word has a variety of senses and connotations, which can be added, removed, or altered over time, often to the extent that cognates across space and time have very different meanings....."
    Wikipedia

  3. #113
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    Re: Gay marriage: MPs debate and vote, The Ayes have it!

    "Artificial
    This originally meant ‘full of artistic or technical skill’. Now its meaning has a very different slant.

    Nice
    This comes from the Latin ‘not to know’. Originally a ‘nice person’ was someone who was ignorant or unaware.....

    Brave
    This once was used to signify cowardice. Indeed, its old meaning lives on in the word ‘bravado’.

    Manufacture
    From the Latin meaning ‘to make by hand’ this originally signified things that were created by craftsmen. Now the opposite, made by machines, is its meaning..........."

    Read more: Eight Words Which Have Completely Changed Their Meaning Over Time | Writinghood

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