Page 23 of 26 FirstFirst ... 132122232425 ... LastLast
Results 221 to 230 of 252

Thread: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

  1. #221
    Sage
    Boo Radley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Seen
    11-22-17 @ 04:22 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    36,858

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by ReformCollege View Post
    Please find me an African American who thinks we should return to slavery.
    I said where he was. And you can find such thoughts in past slave writings. Don't go wild with it though. It's not mainstream and I don't agree with. But the fact remains there is net to nothing you can't ind if you look for it.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

  2. #222
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Seen
    01-22-17 @ 09:27 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    4,136

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    I said where he was. And you can find such thoughts in past slave writings. Don't go wild with it though. It's not mainstream and I don't agree with. But the fact remains there is net to nothing you can't ind if you look for it.
    Rhetorical question. But here's my thing, if this woman had been a champion of women in the infantry (even if she never served in the infantry herself), saying "yeah we can do it! look at me!" the left would be all over her as a hero and champion of feminism. But she's not seeking to be a symbol, she's seeking to be a realist. And the argument she makes is very powerful, "As a young lieutenant, I fit the mold of a female who would have had a shot at completing IOC, and I am sure there was a time in my life where I would have volunteered to be an infantryman. I was a star ice hockey player at Bowdoin College, a small elite college in Maine, with a major in government and law. At 5 feet 3 inches I was squatting 200 pounds and benching 145 pounds when I graduated in 2007. I completed Officer Candidates School (OCS) ranked 4 of 52 candidates, graduated 48 of 261 from TBS, and finished second at MOS school. I also repeatedly scored far above average in all female-based physical fitness tests (for example, earning a 292 out of 300 on the Marine physical fitness test). Five years later, I am physically not the woman I once was and my views have greatly changed on the possibility of women having successful long careers while serving in the infantry. I can say from firsthand experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, and not just emotion, that we havenít even begun to analyze and comprehend the gender-specific medical issues and overall physical toll continuous combat operations will have on females.

    I was a motivated, resilient second lieutenant when I deployed to Iraq for 10 months, traveling across the Marine area of operations (AO) and participating in numerous combat operations. Yet, due to the excessive amount of time I spent in full combat load, I was diagnosed with a severe case of restless leg syndrome. My spine had compressed on nerves in my lower back causing neuropathy which compounded the symptoms of restless leg syndrome. While this injury has certainly not been enjoyable, Iraq was a pleasant experience compared to the experiences I endured during my deployment to Afghanistan. At the beginning of my tour in Helmand Province, I was physically capable of conducting combat operations for weeks at a time, remaining in my gear for days if necessary and averaging 16-hour days of engineering operations in the heart of Sangin, one of the most kinetic and challenging AOs in the country. There were numerous occasions where I was sent to a grid coordinate and told to build a PB from the ground up, serving not only as the mission commander but also the base commander until the occupants (infantry units) arrived 5 days later. In most of these situations, I had a sergeant as my assistant commander, and the remainder of my platoon consisted of young, motivated NCOs. I was the senior Marine making the final decisions on construction concerns, along with 24-hour base defense and leading 30 Marines at any given time. The physical strain of enduring combat operations and the stress of being responsible for the lives and well-being of such a young group in an extremely kinetic environment were compounded by lack of sleep, which ultimately took a physical toll on my body that I couldnít have foreseen." .....


    "I understand that everyone is affected differently; however, I am confident that should the Marine Corps attempt to fully integrate women into the infantry, we as an institution are going to experience a colossal increase in crippling and career-ending medical conditions for females."

    But to completely ignore her argument, and to completely ignore the real life implications of this in favor of symbolism is completely absurd.

  3. #223
    Sage
    Boo Radley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Seen
    11-22-17 @ 04:22 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    36,858

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by ReformCollege View Post
    Rhetorical question. But here's my thing, if this woman had been a champion of women in the infantry (even if she never served in the infantry herself), saying "yeah we can do it! look at me!" the left would be all over her as a hero and champion of feminism. But she's not seeking to be a symbol, she's seeking to be a realist. And the argument she makes is very powerful, "As a young lieutenant, I fit the mold of a female who would have had a shot at completing IOC, and I am sure there was a time in my life where I would have volunteered to be an infantryman. I was a star ice hockey player at Bowdoin College, a small elite college in Maine, with a major in government and law. At 5 feet 3 inches I was squatting 200 pounds and benching 145 pounds when I graduated in 2007. I completed Officer Candidates School (OCS) ranked 4 of 52 candidates, graduated 48 of 261 from TBS, and finished second at MOS school. I also repeatedly scored far above average in all female-based physical fitness tests (for example, earning a 292 out of 300 on the Marine physical fitness test). Five years later, I am physically not the woman I once was and my views have greatly changed on the possibility of women having successful long careers while serving in the infantry. I can say from firsthand experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, and not just emotion, that we haven’t even begun to analyze and comprehend the gender-specific medical issues and overall physical toll continuous combat operations will have on females.

    I was a motivated, resilient second lieutenant when I deployed to Iraq for 10 months, traveling across the Marine area of operations (AO) and participating in numerous combat operations. Yet, due to the excessive amount of time I spent in full combat load, I was diagnosed with a severe case of restless leg syndrome. My spine had compressed on nerves in my lower back causing neuropathy which compounded the symptoms of restless leg syndrome. While this injury has certainly not been enjoyable, Iraq was a pleasant experience compared to the experiences I endured during my deployment to Afghanistan. At the beginning of my tour in Helmand Province, I was physically capable of conducting combat operations for weeks at a time, remaining in my gear for days if necessary and averaging 16-hour days of engineering operations in the heart of Sangin, one of the most kinetic and challenging AOs in the country. There were numerous occasions where I was sent to a grid coordinate and told to build a PB from the ground up, serving not only as the mission commander but also the base commander until the occupants (infantry units) arrived 5 days later. In most of these situations, I had a sergeant as my assistant commander, and the remainder of my platoon consisted of young, motivated NCOs. I was the senior Marine making the final decisions on construction concerns, along with 24-hour base defense and leading 30 Marines at any given time. The physical strain of enduring combat operations and the stress of being responsible for the lives and well-being of such a young group in an extremely kinetic environment were compounded by lack of sleep, which ultimately took a physical toll on my body that I couldn’t have foreseen."

    But to completely ignore her argument, and to completely ignore the real life implications of this in favor of symbolism is completely absurd.
    I'm not the left. And I said we could find such a person. But absent some real data, one would be better than he other.

    As for hardship stories, no one suggest anything is easy. I only question the claim that it cannot be handled by a woman.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

  4. #224
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Seen
    01-22-17 @ 09:27 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    4,136

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    I'm not the left. And I said we could find such a person. But absent some real data, one would be better than he other.

    As for hardship stories, no one suggest anything is easy. I only question the claim that it cannot be handled by a woman.
    Maybe if you read the article, you would get such data.


    "There is a drastic shortage of historical data on female attrition or medical ailments of women who have executed sustained combat operations. This said, we need only to review the statistics from our entry-level schools to realize that there is a significant difference in the physical longevity between male and female Marines. At OCS the attrition rate for female candidates in 2011 was historically low at 40 percent, while the male candidates attrite at a much lower rate of 16 percent. Of candidates who were dropped from training because they were injured or not physically qualified, females were breaking at a much higher rate than males, 14 percent versus 4 percent. The same trends were seen at TBS in 2011; the attrition rate for females was 13 percent versus 5 percent for males, and 5 percent of females were found not physically qualified compared with 1 percent of males. Further, both of these training venues have physical fitness standards that are easier for females; at IOC there is one standard regardless of gender. The attrition rate for males attending IOC in 2011 was 17 percent. Should female Marines ultimately attend IOC, we can expect significantly higher attrition rates and long-term injuries for women."

  5. #225
    Sewer Rat
    Risky Thicket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    23,799

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by ReformCollege View Post
    I would like to think we can avoid unnecessary combat intervention by using rational discretion.
    I would like to think that too. Experience and history has taught me that we cannot. The ones who give the orders are not the ones who die - and nor do their families.










    "When Faith preaches Hate, Blessed are the Doubters." - Amin Maalouf

    When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often, that person is crazy. ~Dave Barry



  6. #226
    Sage
    Boo Radley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Seen
    11-22-17 @ 04:22 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    36,858

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by ReformCollege View Post
    Maybe if you read the article, you would get such data.


    "There is a drastic shortage of historical data on female attrition or medical ailments of women who have executed sustained combat operations. This said, we need only to review the statistics from our entry-level schools to realize that there is a significant difference in the physical longevity between male and female Marines. At OCS the attrition rate for female candidates in 2011 was historically low at 40 percent, while the male candidates attrite at a much lower rate of 16 percent. Of candidates who were dropped from training because they were injured or not physically qualified, females were breaking at a much higher rate than males, 14 percent versus 4 percent. The same trends were seen at TBS in 2011; the attrition rate for females was 13 percent versus 5 percent for males, and 5 percent of females were found not physically qualified compared with 1 percent of males. Further, both of these training venues have physical fitness standards that are easier for females; at IOC there is one standard regardless of gender. The attrition rate for males attending IOC in 2011 was 17 percent. Should female Marines ultimately attend IOC, we can expect significantly higher attrition rates and long-term injuries for women."
    Notice the words "shortage of."

    Women have for a long time been treated differently in this country, thus trained to be a certain way. Look at athletics for example. Prior to title 9 female athletes were far inferior to what we re seeing recently. I would suspect that like with athletics, once more was expected, improvement would come. Currently it s not shocking that men would do better, in time that my change.

    However, the point us she is not even challenged. The poster merely accepts it. While we don't really know if her numbers are correct or how representative they are of all females, no questions re ask, n review of data sought, no effort to proved data. Just an opinion piece.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

  7. #227
    Sage
    Boo Radley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Seen
    11-22-17 @ 04:22 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    36,858

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by Risky Thicket View Post
    I would like to think that too. Experience and history has taught me that we cannot. The ones who give the orders are not the ones who die - and nor do their families.
    Sadly, this is too true.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

  8. #228
    Sage
    cpwill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USofA
    Last Seen
    Today @ 12:01 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    57,057

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo Radley View Post
    Well there you go. I know an African American who thinks we should return to slavery. Based on your logic here, we should. When will you learn this type of tactic is ineffective?
    So, no. You didn't read it.

  9. #229
    Sage
    cpwill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USofA
    Last Seen
    Today @ 12:01 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    57,057

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by ReformCollege View Post
    Maybe if you read the article, you would get such data.


    "There is a drastic shortage of historical data on female attrition or medical ailments of women who have executed sustained combat operations. This said, we need only to review the statistics from our entry-level schools to realize that there is a significant difference in the physical longevity between male and female Marines. At OCS the attrition rate for female candidates in 2011 was historically low at 40 percent, while the male candidates attrite at a much lower rate of 16 percent. Of candidates who were dropped from training because they were injured or not physically qualified, females were breaking at a much higher rate than males, 14 percent versus 4 percent. The same trends were seen at TBS in 2011; the attrition rate for females was 13 percent versus 5 percent for males, and 5 percent of females were found not physically qualified compared with 1 percent of males. Further, both of these training venues have physical fitness standards that are easier for females; at IOC there is one standard regardless of gender. The attrition rate for males attending IOC in 2011 was 17 percent. Should female Marines ultimately attend IOC, we can expect significantly higher attrition rates and long-term injuries for women."
    After she wrote this, we sent females, carefully selecting the fittest, most ready, bad-assesst of the lieutenants out of OCS to IOC. They broke in the first few weeks.

  10. #230
    Sage
    Boo Radley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Seen
    11-22-17 @ 04:22 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    36,858

    Re: Pentagon to overturn ban on women in military combat roles

    Quote Originally Posted by cpwill View Post
    So, no. You didn't read it.
    Yes I did.

    AUSTAN GOOLSBEE: I think the world vests too much power, certainly in the president, probably in Washington in general for its influence on the economy, because most all of the economy has nothing to do with the government.

Page 23 of 26 FirstFirst ... 132122232425 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •