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Thread: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    Considering it was run by the American community and companies, with American teachers and textbooks and an American curriculum... then yes! Hell my first English teacher came from Austin, Texas and had a very thick accent.. which later on pissed off my English Oxford trained teachers at the British school heh because I had learned that accent.
    I think you should go take a class on statistics.
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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    Nope, an American International School in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia... was lonnnnng ago though.
    LOL. OK, I'm sure that's right in line with your typical suburban school in Denver. Wow.

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    OK, let's pretend that French schools are in session for 9.5 hours/day (8:30 - 6) for 4 days a week, US is 8-4 (8 hours/day) 5 days a week. That's 38 hours/week in France and 40 hours/week in the US.

    Ahh math, how I love you.
    Average school hours in the US is about 6.7 hours a day.

    Average length of school year and average length of school day, by selected characteristics: United States, 2003–04

    or

    Chicago pushes longer school days as key to achievement: 'We had to do something' - U.S. News

    The national average is 6.7 hours in school.
    That gives 33,5 hours a week on a 5 day week.

    Yes I love math and the internet.

    American school children on average leave school by 3pm. Now there are some schools who have longer hours, but they are not the average.
    PeteEU

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by Erod View Post
    LOL. OK, I'm sure that's right in line with your typical suburban school in Denver. Wow.
    So now because the school was in another country, but run by Americans including the American government .. then suddenly it is not as good as some random school in the US? Talk about arrogance. Guess all those US expats and military personnel around the world with kids in local schools are screwing over their kids with sub-standard schooling because the school is not located in the US, but still uses American teachers, text-books and curriculum.
    PeteEU

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    Eh? Who is artificially hindering anything? All he wants to do is not give homework to children who have a long ass day as it is! Like it or not, in Europe, we work to live, not live to work.

    And who is going to prevent that by not giving out homework? Nothing is preventing parents or the students themselves to read books or learn after school..

    Get a grip, this is nothing but another typical France bashing bull**** thread started because someone does not understand how things are done outside the good old USA.
    First, your French apologism is clearly clouding your comprehension and judgment skills. I cannot speak for others, but my post was about concept, not nationalism. France is merely the example at hand. Nothing more, nothing less.

    Second, if you cannot see that lowering the bar for those who want to excel is the same as lowering the bar for everybody, then maybe you are a good example why other parts of the world are catching up to, and surpassing, Europe in many areas.

    I'm very much a "work to live" person myself, probably to my own detriment at times, but I don't begrudge those who wish to go the extra step and scheme to pull them back to my level.
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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    People need to understand what kind of government was just elected in France. I'm not surprised at this at all. This is how they tear at the fabric, a little nudge at a time. This isn't some typical PC going on, this is outright communistic principles in play. The goal is to develop a mindset among the masses that if you suck, don't worry, no one will ever know because the government will make it so that everyone else sucks right along with you.

    Tim-
    “When buying and selling are controlled by legislation, the first things to be bought and sold are legislators.” - P. J. O’Rourke
    “Socialism is great until you run out of someone elses money” Margaret Thatcher

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    So now because the school was in another country, but run by Americans including the American government .. then suddenly it is not as good as some random school in the US? Talk about arrogance. Guess all those US expats and military personnel around the world with kids in local schools are screwing over their kids with sub-standard schooling because the school is not located in the US, but still uses American teachers, text-books and curriculum.
    "American teachers, textbooks, and curriculum".

    There is no such thing. That's what socialists don't understand about capitalistic countries. There is no mandated official textbook or curriculum (at least not yet, God help us).

    People here have the choice, opportunity, and freedom to seek out an advanced, stringent, specific, and family-driven approach to education, which does create a difference in graduates in the end. It's called competition, and if your parents, and you, don't give a crap about your education, you're going to be left behind by some. Your education won't be equal to others, regardless of what "diploma" you are given.

    Capitalists focus on encouraging the achievers. Others focus on bringing everyone to the same level as the lowest common denominator.

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    So now because the school was in another country, but run by Americans including the American government .. then suddenly it is not as good as some random school in the US? Talk about arrogance. Guess all those US expats and military personnel around the world with kids in local schools are screwing over their kids with sub-standard schooling because the school is not located in the US, but still uses American teachers, text-books and curriculum.
    It's one data point for a school not even in the US.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

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    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    So now because the school was in another country, but run by Americans including the American government .. then suddenly it is not as good as some random school in the US? Talk about arrogance. Guess all those US expats and military personnel around the world with kids in local schools are screwing over their kids with sub-standard schooling because the school is not located in the US, but still uses American teachers, text-books and curriculum.
    you are correct
    the American schools in foreign countries tend to be quite good
    The school day in France typically runs from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a half day on Saturday, although students do not attend school on Wednesday or Sunday. Lunch is a two-hour break for public school students. Students usually attend school from ages 6 to 18. The average number of students per class is 23. Uniforms are not required, but religious dress of any kind is banned. The school year for this country in the northern hemisphere stretches from August to June, and is divided into four seven-week terms, with one to two weeks of vacation in between.


    Students in the primary grades, from age’s 6 to 11, learn basic skills in reading, writing, and math, as well as participate in exercises to develop observation, reasoning, imagination, and physical abilities. Older students study French, math, physical and natural sciences, foreign language, history and geography, economics, and civics.
    now let's look at who we are competing against:
    The school year in South Korea typically runs from March to February. The year is divided into two semesters (March to July and September to February). School days are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., but many stay later into the evening. In addition, students help clean up their classroom before leaving. Most students remain in the same room while their teachers rotate throughout the day. Each room has about thirty students with ten computers for them to share.


    After 5 p.m. students have a short dinner at home, or eat at school, before study sessions or other activities begin in the evening. Students attend school Monday to Friday, with some Saturday classes scattered throughout the year. Their classes cover the Korean language, math, science, physical education, social studies, moral education, music, fine and practical arts. In third grade students begin receiving English instruction for two hours a week.
    Most Japanese schools run on a trimester schedule. The academic year begins in April and ends the following March, with breaks for summer, winter and spring separating the three terms. Uniforms are required and there are extensive rules for hair styles, shoes, socks, skirt length, make-up, accessories, and more.


    In each classroom, the average number of students is 29 with five or six computers to share between them. Students in Japan study academic subjects, such as Japanese language, math, reading, social studies, music, and art, and they also receive moral education. Moral education involves teaching students about health and safety, living a disciplined life, courtesy, understanding and confidence, public manners, and environmental awareness.
    Because China is in the northern hemisphere, its summer months are in line with Asia, Europe, and North America. The school year in China typically runs from the beginning of September to mid-July. Summer vacation is generally spent in summer classes or studying for entrance exams. The average school day runs from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a two-hour lunch break. Formal education in China lasts for nine years. China provides all students with uniforms, but does not require they be worn.


    There are about 21 students in each classroom. All Chinese students study from textbooks that emphasize China’s unity, past and present accomplishments, and its future. Students in China also have great access to computer technology, with a computer to student ratio of 1:2. Chinese language and math skills are tested at the end of each year. Math is typically taught by drill, which means students are repeatedly taught the basics of math until they are able to demonstrate comprehension. Education in China since the turn of the 21st century has been undergoing reform, with curriculum being redesigned to emphasize group activities and other methods believed to foster creativity and innovation.
    School Years around the World — Infoplease.com
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    Re: French president pushing homework ban as part of ed reforms

    I found this (it's actually hard to find one source for world school day comparisons)

    China and India are important comparisons, but other countries could provide even greater insight into whether U.S. students are spending as much time in school, particularly countries that typically score high on international assessments, such as Korea, Japan, Finland, and Canada, as well as economic competitors such as England, France, Germany, and Italy. The data set that allows us to do this comes from the OECD. It does not include the number of school days, but looks directly at required instructional hours.

    According to the OECD, the hours of compulsory instruction per year in these countries range from 608 hours in Finland (a top performer) to 926 hours in France (average) at the elementary level, compared to the over 900 hours required in California, New York, Texas, and Massachusetts. Of particular note, no state requires as few hours as Finland, even though Finland scores near the top of nearly every international assessment. As a matter of fact, Vermont – a high-performing state7 -- requires the fewest number of hours (700 hours) for its elementary students (grades 1-2) than any other state, and it still requires more than Finland. Vermont’s requirement is also more than the 612 hours high-achieving Korea requires of its early elementary students. Moreover, all but 5 states require more hours of instruction at the early elementary school level than the OECD countries8 average of 759 hours.

    At the middle school level, total hours of instruction range from 777 hours in Finland (a top performer) to 1001 in Italy (an average performer). Three of our 5 large states, New York (990 hours), Texas (1,260 hours), and Massachusetts (990 hours) would rank near the top of all industrialized nations in number of hours required. California and Florida would rank near the middle at 900 hours but still above the OECD average of 886 hours. It should be noted that even at the middle school level, countries like Japan and Korea require fewer hours (868 and 867 respectively) than most U.S. states. So by the 8th grade, students in most U.S. states have been required to receive more hours of instruction than students in most industrialized countries, including high-performing Finland, Japan, and Korea.

    In most countries, there is a significant increase in the time students are required to be in school at the high school level. In the U.S., most states require the same number of hours in high school as in middle school. Just as they did at middle school level, Finland (856 hours) and Italy (1,089 hours) required the fewest and most hours of instruction respectively. Italy’s 1,089 hours surpasses all but 2 out of our 5 selected states. Texas requires 1,260 hours of instruction at the high school level, while California requires 1,080 hours. Korea requires 1,020 hours of instruction at the high school level. Nearly half (22) the states require more instructional hours than Korea. Moreover, the vast majority of states (42) require more hours of instruction than the OECD average of 902 hours. Again, there’s no evidence that students in other countries are required to receive more instruction than students in the United States.
    Time in school: How does the U.S. compare?
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

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