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Thread: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

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    Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    It does look that way.

    Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother? - Red Tape
    When the Olympic flame is doused on Sunday, we know the cheers will quiet, the athletes will move on and fans will go home. But will Big Brother stay behind?
    Every Olympics host city goes through it: the Olympic hangover. When the athletes step off the medal podiums, the city must clean up, pay the bills and figure out how to monetize a series of shiny new venues. The most important decision, however, might seem much more subtle: What happens to all those new security cameras and other surveillance technologies that were installed for the Games? Privacy experts fret that, as with Athens, Beijing and Vancouver, the Olympics means a steep ratcheting up of security that never really gets ratcheted down.
    "It would be a tragedy if the most visible legacy of the Games in London was a huge increase in the amount of surveillance people are subjected to in their everyday lives," said Nick Pickles, director of London-based Big Brother Watch.
    Host cities tolerate massive shows of security that would otherwise be unimaginable. In London, which already has more CCTV security cameras than any other city in the world, 2,000 new cameras were installed in the Olympic Village, while nearly 2,000 more were installed around the city, according to Big Brother Watch. License plate recognition systems have been installed throughout London. There are even surface-to-air missiles atop apartment buildings and more military troops on the ground than Britain has in Afghanistan. An $877 million effort, it's been called the largest peacetime deployment of security forces in history, but the question remains: Will there be mission creep? How much of that infrastructure and the publicís newfound tolerance for being watched will remain after the Games are finished?
    Earlier this year, the Electronic Frontier Foundation published an analysis of all recent Games and says the results are disheartening. It should come as no surprise that the Beijing Summer Games were used as an excuse to install thousands of cameras that are still in operation, said the reportís author, Rebecca Bowe. But other cities have suffered similar fates, too.
    "The Games bring a legacy that lives well beyond the prestige," Bowe said. "We've witnessed time and again, the security infrastructure lives on well beyond the Games."
    Concrete concerns
    The concerns aren't merely theoretical. Athens officials installed about 1,000 cameras for the 2004 Summer Games. In 2007, Greece amended its national data protection law to exempt the cameras; Greek privacy commissioner Dimitris Gourgourakis resigned over the incident. The cameras have since been used during protests following economic unrest there.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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    Re: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    The Olympics are corrupt, money oriented and almost always cost taxpayers of the host country tens of billions of dollars.

    They should be completely removed from ANYTHING to do with the government and become strictly private enterprises - just like most other sporting events.

    And if that means scaling back the hoopla - so be it.

    No one is going to die if the Olympics are not as grandiose as they presently are.

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    Re: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    Quote Originally Posted by DA60 View Post
    The Olympics are corrupt, money oriented and almost always cost taxpayers of the host country tens of billions of dollars.

    They should be completely removed from ANYTHING to do with the government and become strictly private enterprises - just like most other sporting events.

    And if that means scaling back the hoopla - so be it.

    No one is going to die if the Olympics are not as grandiose as they presently are.
    The Olympics would die, and with that I would die a little inside. The Olympics give me the opportunity to pretend to be interested in professional trampolining once every four years!

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    Re: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    As long as the security cameras keep feeding me pictures like this, Iím addicted and need another ďBig BrotherĒ security camera fix:

    448018852_2006jdantzscher05_122_618lo.jpg448019451_2006jdantzscher07_122_485lo.jpg448020381_2007jdantzscher05_122_895lo.jpg448022863_janelledantzscher_122_506lo.jpg719419562_sm002_122_147lo.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    It would seem that the constitution is just a god damn piece of paper, to be trotted out when expedient.

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    Re: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    Quote Originally Posted by GPS_Flex View Post
    As long as the security cameras keep feeding me pictures like this, I’m addicted and need another “Big Brother” security camera fix:
    Big brother is feeding those kinds of pictures.That is either photographers or news outlets taking those photos.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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    Re: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    It does look that way.

    Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother? - Red Tape
    When the Olympic flame is doused on Sunday, we know the cheers will quiet, the athletes will move on and fans will go home. But will Big Brother stay behind?
    Every Olympics host city goes through it: the Olympic hangover. When the athletes step off the medal podiums, the city must clean up, pay the bills and figure out how to monetize a series of shiny new venues. The most important decision, however, might seem much more subtle: What happens to all those new security cameras and other surveillance technologies that were installed for the Games? Privacy experts fret that, as with Athens, Beijing and Vancouver, the Olympics means a steep ratcheting up of security that never really gets ratcheted down.
    "It would be a tragedy if the most visible legacy of the Games in London was a huge increase in the amount of surveillance people are subjected to in their everyday lives," said Nick Pickles, director of London-based Big Brother Watch.
    Host cities tolerate massive shows of security that would otherwise be unimaginable. In London, which already has more CCTV security cameras than any other city in the world, 2,000 new cameras were installed in the Olympic Village, while nearly 2,000 more were installed around the city, according to Big Brother Watch. License plate recognition systems have been installed throughout London. There are even surface-to-air missiles atop apartment buildings and more military troops on the ground than Britain has in Afghanistan. An $877 million effort, it's been called the largest peacetime deployment of security forces in history, but the question remains: Will there be mission creep? How much of that infrastructure and the public’s newfound tolerance for being watched will remain after the Games are finished?
    Earlier this year, the Electronic Frontier Foundation published an analysis of all recent Games and says the results are disheartening. It should come as no surprise that the Beijing Summer Games were used as an excuse to install thousands of cameras that are still in operation, said the report’s author, Rebecca Bowe. But other cities have suffered similar fates, too.
    "The Games bring a legacy that lives well beyond the prestige," Bowe said. "We've witnessed time and again, the security infrastructure lives on well beyond the Games."
    Concrete concerns
    The concerns aren't merely theoretical. Athens officials installed about 1,000 cameras for the 2004 Summer Games. In 2007, Greece amended its national data protection law to exempt the cameras; Greek privacy commissioner Dimitris Gourgourakis resigned over the incident. The cameras have since been used during protests following economic unrest there.
    No, Big Brother already exists to the extent, it just becomes a bit more obvious for large, public events like the Olympics. Big Brother got its Trojan Horse quite some time ago.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

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    Re: Are Olympics a Trojan horse for Big Brother?

    Interesting - I don't think this point has been raised in the UK as of yet (and it's a typically American thing to worry about...) As you said, Londoners are already pretty much the most-watched people on the Earth. Licence plate recognition exists into and out of the centre anyway, because of our congestion charge. The roof-top missiles will, obviously, go.

    Giving this some more thought, the article's pretty misleading. A massive industrial wasteland, and a few housing and small shopping streets, are being replaced with a huge shopping centre, and several large stadia. It's only to be expected that there will be more cameras; busy areas all have them. Excess cameras are, perhaps, an issue here, but this doesn't really make a difference.
    Last edited by Londoner; 08-12-12 at 12:31 PM.

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