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Thread: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by X Factor View Post
    I've never denied my own hackish tendencies
    Quote Originally Posted by Pin dÁr View Post
    scientific by itself isn't enough of course.
    Quote Originally Posted by blaxshep View Post
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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by zgoldsmith23 View Post
    He can't win with you, can he?
    So, to the left, Obama gets all kinds of praise for things like this, and none of the blame for our weak economy, high unemployment numbers, low business start up numbers, etc etc...

    How anyone can say he's good for America is beyond me. Honestly.

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by Masada View Post
    So, to the left, Obama gets all kinds of praise for things like this, and none of the blame for our weak economy, high unemployment numbers, low business start up numbers, etc etc...

    How anyone can say he's good for America is beyond me. Honestly.
    There's a difference in legitimate criticism and just being a hack who despises anything someone on the Left does.
    Quote Originally Posted by X Factor View Post
    I've never denied my own hackish tendencies
    Quote Originally Posted by Pin dÁr View Post
    scientific by itself isn't enough of course.
    Quote Originally Posted by blaxshep View Post
    Not all Nazis were bad people

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by zgoldsmith23 View Post
    It doesn't strike you as amazing that in the [20,000 years modern Humans (agricultural capabilities)] or [50,000 years modern Humans (tools were first constructed)] or [200,000 years modern Humans (first Homo)] we have explored other planets? In 50 years we've gone from the moon to Mars. That doesn't appeal to you? Doesn't excite you?
    It did the first time yes, the thrill is gone and it's just a waste of money now.

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by sawyerloggingon View Post
    It did the first time yes, the thrill is gone and it's just a waste of money now.
    Thrill? Knowledge was and continues to be the motivating factor behind expeditions such as these, at least among serious circles.

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by sawyerloggingon View Post
    Does the term, "been there done that" ring a bell?
    We haven't "been there, done that". Curiosity is a portable laboratory on wheels, capable of not only retreiving soil, atmosphere and rock samples, but also capable of performing sophisticated testing and sending the results back to earth. This is the first time a robotic space device has been landed in a pin-pointed location for specific targeted testing protocols, and the first time a robotic space device can perform those targeted testing protocols itself.

    No, we haven't "been there, done that". And it's awesome.

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    I never thought id see it....a landing on mars

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by DiAnna View Post
    We haven't "been there, done that". Curiosity is a portable laboratory on wheels, capable of not only retreiving soil, atmosphere and rock samples, but also capable of performing sophisticated testing and sending the results back to earth. This is the first time a robotic space device has been landed in a pin-pointed location for specific targeted testing protocols, and the first time a robotic space device can perform those targeted testing protocols itself.

    No, we haven't "been there, done that". And it's awesome.
    Yes we really have been there done that.

    "The Mars Pathfinder conducted different investigations on the Martian soil using three scientific instruments. The lander contained a stereoscopic camera with spatial filters on an expandable pole called Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP),[5][6] and the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET)[7] which acts as a Mars meteorological station, collecting data about pressure, temperature, and winds. The MET structure included three windsocks mounted at three heights on a pole, the topmost at about one meter (yard) and generally registered winds from the West.[8]

    The Sojourner rover had an Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer (APXS),[9] which was used to analyze the components of the rocks and soil.
    The rover also had two black-and-white cameras and a color one. These instruments could investigate the geology of the Martian surface from just a few millimeters to many hundreds of meters, the geochemistry and evolutionary history of the rocks and surface, the magnetic and mechanical properties of the land, as well as the magnetic properties of the dust, atmosphere and the rotational and orbital dynamics of the planet. The rover had two black and white 0.3-megapixel cameras on the front (768 horizontal pixels × 484 vertical pixels configured in 4×4 pixel blocks), coupled with five laser stripe projectors, which enabled stereoscopic images to be taken along with measurements for hazard detection on the rover's path. On the back, near the APXS and rotated by 90°, there was a third camera of the same specifications which supported taking colour images. This back colour camera provided images of the APXS's target area and the rover's tracks on the ground, and had sensitivity to green (12 pixels out of the 16 total pixels in each 4×4 pixel block), red (2 pixels), and blue (2 pixels), with the blue-sensitive pixels being sensitive to infrared as well. However, all cameras had zinc-selenide lens which blocked blue light below 500 nm, thus only allowing infrared wavelengths to reach the blue pixels. All three cameras were CCDs manufactured by Eastman Kodak Company, and were controlled by the rover's CPU. They all had auto-exposure and bad pixel handling capabilities, and the image parameters (exposure time, compression used, etc.) were included in the transmitted images as part of the image header. The rover could compress the front cameras' images using the block truncation coding (BTC) algorithm, but it could only do the same for the back camera's images if the colour information was discarded. The cameras' optical resolution was sufficient to resolve 0.6 cm details across a 0.65 m range.[10]
    "

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    The MSL mission also implemented a new landing system capable of delivering the MSL to the surface of Mars. I'm totally stoked to hear about any kind of biological signals or signs of past life on the Planet. One theory suggests that Mars used to have liquid oceans composed of water, which would be amazing. Astronomy is my second favorite science behind biology. Both of them fascinate me.
    When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. -Socrates
    Tired of elections being between the lesser of two evils.

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    re: NASA's rover Curiosity lands on Mars [W:206]

    Quote Originally Posted by sawyerloggingon View Post
    Yes we really have been there done that.

    "The Mars Pathfinder conducted different investigations on the Martian soil using three scientific instruments. The lander contained a stereoscopic camera with spatial filters on an expandable pole called Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP),[5][6] and the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET)[7] which acts as a Mars meteorological station, collecting data about pressure, temperature, and winds. The MET structure included three windsocks mounted at three heights on a pole, the topmost at about one meter (yard) and generally registered winds from the West.[8]

    The rover also had two black-and-white cameras and a color one. These instruments could investigate the geology of the Martian surface from just a few millimeters to many hundreds of meters, the geochemistry and evolutionary history of the rocks and surface, the magnetic and mechanical properties of the land, as well as the magnetic properties of the dust, atmosphere and the rotational and orbital dynamics of the planet. The rover had two black and white 0.3-megapixel cameras on the front (768 horizontal pixels × 484 vertical pixels configured in 4×4 pixel blocks), coupled with five laser stripe projectors, which enabled stereoscopic images to be taken along with measurements for hazard detection on the rover's path. On the back, near the APXS and rotated by 90°, there was a third camera of the same specifications which supported taking colour images. This back colour camera provided images of the APXS's target area and the rover's tracks on the ground, and had sensitivity to green (12 pixels out of the 16 total pixels in each 4×4 pixel block), red (2 pixels), and blue (2 pixels), with the blue-sensitive pixels being sensitive to infrared as well. However, all cameras had zinc-selenide lens which blocked blue light below 500 nm, thus only allowing infrared wavelengths to reach the blue pixels. All three cameras were CCDs manufactured by Eastman Kodak Company, and were controlled by the rover's CPU. They all had auto-exposure and bad pixel handling capabilities, and the image parameters (exposure time, compression used, etc.) were included in the transmitted images as part of the image header. The rover could compress the front cameras' images using the block truncation coding (BTC) algorithm, but it could only do the same for the back camera's images if the colour information was discarded. The cameras' optical resolution was sufficient to resolve 0.6 cm details across a 0.65 m range.[10]
    "
    I missed the part about having wheels, a complete robotic laboratory and the ability to scoop up soil samples, then do a series of complex, sophisticated testing procedures to analyze the samples, including searches for evidence of biological activity. And of course, digitized b/w and color cameras and video capability far beyond anything we've ever shipped into space before.

    That's a bit more exciting than a windsock.

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