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Thread: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

  1. #171
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker View Post
    I think it's unwise to just assume 9 year olds don't know what guns are, what they can do, and what might happen if they hurt someone seriously.

    There are countless 9 year olds who are well versed in weaponry and all things injury and death - maybe this one individual did kid not know. But I don't know - we don't know him well enough. That's something we can't determine on our own here.
    This is one reason to properly educate and train all children about firearms, especially those who live in a home where guns are owned.

    When my son was about 3 or 4, I took him outside and shot a 2liter jug of water with a 12 gauge shotgun at close range while he stood beside me. It appeared to explode and spewed water everywhere, dramatically making an impression. I showed him the shotgun and said "Now remember: guns have no brain. They will destroy whatever is in front of them, so the person operating the gun had better use his brain about where he points it." I went on to tell him that he was not to touch any gun without my permission and presence, and that to do otherwise would be Big Trouble... but that if he wanted to shoot, all he had to do was ask me and we'd go outside and shoot guns. This got the point across while allowing him a means of satisfying his curiosity safety, removing the "allure of the taboo" from guns.

    I did something very similar with power tools and a circular saw, to educate him on their dangers.

    Any time he wanted to shoot, I'd make time for us to go out to the backyard range. At 4 I let him shoot 22's, I'd kneel behind him and keep my hands on the weapon as he fired it. I constantly repeated the three fundamental rules of safety (don't point, finger off trigger, assume loaded) until he could recite them verbatim.

    Later I began more seriously training him in safe gunhandling methods and marksmanship, and let him shoot anything I own. I also started filling him in on the basic legalities surrounding guns as soon as he could understand.

    At 13 I gave him the combination to the gun safe, but told him never to open it without me unless there was a bona-fide emergency and I wasn't there to handle it. By this point guns were no mystery to him and there was no reason to "sneak a peak" or "play with them" ... he knew all he had to do to handle or shoot any gun in there was to ask me.

    We hunt. By the time you've killed a few rabbits and skinned them and cleaned them, you have no illusions about what guns do to living beings.

    He was also raised to respect human life and hold it as sacred, as part of our religious beliefs; and that human life must never be taken except in dire necessity.

    We've never had an accidental discharge and he's never done anything stupid with guns. At 16 he's a pretty good shot and very meticulous about safe gun handling.
    Last edited by Goshin; 02-25-12 at 08:52 AM.

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  2. #172
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Goshin View Post
    This is one reason to properly educate and train all children about firearms, especially those who live in a home where guns are owned.

    When my son was about 3 or 4, I took him outside and shot a 2liter jug of water with a 12 gauge shotgun at close range while he stood beside me. It appeared to explode and spewed water everywhere, dramatically making an impression. I showed him the shotgun and said "Now remember: guns have no brain. They will destroy whatever is in front of them, so the person operating the gun had better use his brain about where he points it." I went on to tell him that he was not to touch any gun without my permission and presence, and that to do otherwise would be Big Trouble... but that if he wanted to shoot, all he had to do was ask me and we'd go outside and shoot guns. This got the point across while allowing him a means of satisfying his curiosity safety, removing the "allure of the taboo" from guns.

    I did something very similar with power tools and a circular saw, to educate him on their dangers.

    Any time he wanted to shoot, I'd make time for us to go out to the backyard range. At 4 I let him shoot 22's, I'd kneel behind him and keep my hands on the weapon as he fired it. I constantly repeated the three fundamental rules of safety (don't point, finger off trigger, assume loaded) until he could recite them verbatim.

    Later I began more seriously training him in safe gunhandling methods and marksmanship, and let him shoot anything I own. I also started filling him in on the basic legalities surrounding guns as soon as he could understand.

    At 13 I gave him the combination to the gun safe, but told him never to open it without me unless there was a bona-fide emergency and I wasn't there to handle it. By this point guns were no mystery to him and there was no reason to "sneak a peak" or "play with them" ... he knew all he had to do to handle or shoot any gun in there was to ask me.

    We hunt. By the time you've killed a few rabbits and skinned them and cleaned them, you have no illusions about what guns do to living beings.

    He was also raised to respect human life and hold it as sacred, as part of our religious beliefs; and that human life must never be taken except in dire necessity.

    We've never had an accidental discharge and he's never done anything stupid with guns. At 16 he's a pretty good shot and very meticulous about safe gun handling.
    I think I shot Pellet guns at age 6-7 but a 22 for the first time at age 9-10 at a summer camp. I grew up around guns and our house-starting at age 8 was filled with an ever expanding collection of animal heads my father collected on safaris in Kenya. So I knew about guns. At age ten or so my father took me to my godfather's home that was located on a fair amount of land and had a cornfield where they would hunt dove and quail. He took an old 410 bore Iver Johnson side by side shotgun for me to try. Didn't hit the clay pigeons thrown with a hand launcher. Before we got there we stopped at a roadside farm stand and my dad bought a pumpkin.

    before we started shooting, he put the pumpkin on a post on a fence and noted -a pumpkin is about the size of someone's head

    he took the little shotgun-not much bigger than the pellet rifle I had become fairly proficient with and from about 5-6 feet away he shot the pumpkin. It blew up. He looked at me and said-this is what a shotgun can do to your head or someone else's head if you are careless with it. That lesson took place in 1969 or so. 11 years later I was at the Olympic trials trying to make the shooting team. I remember loading my several thousand dollar perazzi Mirage Shotgun after pulling out a couple shells from my vest that had USA sewn across the back of it thinking about that pumpkin. Its a lesson I never forgot.

  3. #173
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Goshin View Post
    This is one reason to properly educate and train all children about firearms, especially those who live in a home where guns are owned.

    When my son was about 3 or 4, I took him outside and shot a 2liter jug of water with a 12 gauge shotgun at close range while he stood beside me. It appeared to explode and spewed water everywhere, dramatically making an impression. I showed him the shotgun and said "Now remember: guns have no brain. They will destroy whatever is in front of them, so the person operating the gun had better use his brain about where he points it." I went on to tell him that he was not to touch any gun without my permission and presence, and that to do otherwise would be Big Trouble... but that if he wanted to shoot, all he had to do was ask me and we'd go outside and shoot guns. This got the point across while allowing him a means of satisfying his curiosity safety, removing the "allure of the taboo" from guns.

    I did something very similar with power tools and a circular saw, to educate him on their dangers.

    Any time he wanted to shoot, I'd make time for us to go out to the backyard range. At 4 I let him shoot 22's, I'd kneel behind him and keep my hands on the weapon as he fired it. I constantly repeated the three fundamental rules of safety (don't point, finger off trigger, assume loaded) until he could recite them verbatim.

    Later I began more seriously training him in safe gunhandling methods and marksmanship, and let him shoot anything I own. I also started filling him in on the basic legalities surrounding guns as soon as he could understand.

    At 13 I gave him the combination to the gun safe, but told him never to open it without me unless there was a bona-fide emergency and I wasn't there to handle it. By this point guns were no mystery to him and there was no reason to "sneak a peak" or "play with them" ... he knew all he had to do to handle or shoot any gun in there was to ask me.

    We hunt. By the time you've killed a few rabbits and skinned them and cleaned them, you have no illusions about what guns do to living beings.

    He was also raised to respect human life and hold it as sacred, as part of our religious beliefs; and that human life must never be taken except in dire necessity.

    We've never had an accidental discharge and he's never done anything stupid with guns. At 16 he's a pretty good shot and very meticulous about safe gun handling.
    Quote Originally Posted by TurtleDude View Post
    I think I shot Pellet guns at age 6-7 but a 22 for the first time at age 9-10 at a summer camp. I grew up around guns and our house-starting at age 8 was filled with an ever expanding collection of animal heads my father collected on safaris in Kenya. So I knew about guns. At age ten or so my father took me to my godfather's home that was located on a fair amount of land and had a cornfield where they would hunt dove and quail. He took an old 410 bore Iver Johnson side by side shotgun for me to try. Didn't hit the clay pigeons thrown with a hand launcher. Before we got there we stopped at a roadside farm stand and my dad bought a pumpkin.

    before we started shooting, he put the pumpkin on a post on a fence and noted -a pumpkin is about the size of someone's head

    he took the little shotgun-not much bigger than the pellet rifle I had become fairly proficient with and from about 5-6 feet away he shot the pumpkin. It blew up. He looked at me and said-this is what a shotgun can do to your head or someone else's head if you are careless with it. That lesson took place in 1969 or so. 11 years later I was at the Olympic trials trying to make the shooting team. I remember loading my several thousand dollar perazzi Mirage Shotgun after pulling out a couple shells from my vest that had USA sewn across the back of it thinking about that pumpkin. Its a lesson I never forgot.
    My best friend is a juvinile probation officer. When he was going to firearms training there was a sheriff's deputy who was using ill fitting ear protection, she didn't want to lose time so adjusted it between shots with a her loaded .40. A couple of the fellow class attendees were rushing to stop her and then thought better of it because if they spooked her she could have pulled the trigger with the gun to her head. The next day the instructor told her to load full mag. and told everyone "See this mud pile? It's roughly the consistency of the human brain." He shot the entire magazine into it splashing mud on everyone and then goes "If I EVER see anyone put a loaded gun to their head again they'll do pushups until they puke".
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  4. #174
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    This is not a simple case of intentionally throwing a rock through someone's house window because of an impulse control problem. The kid a brought a gun to school. He belongs in a mental institution until he's adult because only insane people would bring a gun to scholl until the age of 9.

    Why do you think this child should get a harsher sentence than an adult?

    I am not an expert but 9 years for a gun going off accidentally sounds like a lot for an adult. He didn't even have it in his hands at the time.

    Can one of the law enforcement officers here tell us how much time an adult would get for a similar charge?

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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by danarhea View Post
    This is not a case for gun control at all. You don't punish the rest of us because of what some jackass did.... Or maybe you do. Some people drive recklessly, and cause accidents. That's it!! BAN ALL CARS NOW!!
    Most laws protecting the publics safety stem from 1 incident that set the wheels in motion. It happens all the time.

  6. #176
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    Intentions with the gun are irrelevant. He brought a gun to school. That is not normal behavior. He belongs in a psych ward til the age of 18.
    Do youthink this kid understood the remifications of his action, bringing the gun to school, or do you think, like most 9 year old, the gun was more of a toy to him than a weapon.

    Why, in your opinion should he beheld only until he is 18? What is special about that number?

  7. #177
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Mason66 View Post
    Why do you think this child should get a harsher sentence than an adult?

    I am not an expert but 9 years for a gun going off accidentally sounds like a lot for an adult. He didn't even have it in his hands at the time.

    Can one of the law enforcement officers here tell us how much time an adult would get for a similar charge?
    yes really - stupidity is not the same as insanity.
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  8. #178
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    You claim she shouldn't be held responsible for his actions. Which is insane since had she not left an illegal loaded 45 where a child could get to it this would never have happened.

    You seriously can't connect the dots there?

    Wow, just wow.
    I can connect dots just fine. She did not harm another individual. Her negligence maybe had led to a situation in which another caused harm; but she cannot be held legally responsible for that since she didn't do it. Less there is extenuating evidence to show that she knew the kid had it on him when he went to school, or purposefully gave him the gun for this purpose, etc. There are ways in which she could be held legally responsible. But if this is just a kid grabbing a gun without her knowledge, then while she can certainly be held financially responsible, she cannot (or rather should not) be found legally responsible since she had no hand in the actual act.

    This is all about proper limitations of government force. Its the dots the rest of yall refuse to connect.
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  9. #179
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    I can connect dots just fine. She did not harm another individual. Her negligence maybe had led to a situation in which another caused harm; but she cannot be held legally responsible for that since she didn't do it. Less there is extenuating evidence to show that she knew the kid had it on him when he went to school, or purposefully gave him the gun for this purpose, etc. There are ways in which she could be held legally responsible. But if this is just a kid grabbing a gun without her knowledge, then while she can certainly be held financially responsible, she cannot (or rather should not) be found legally responsible since she had no hand in the actual act.

    This is all about proper limitations of government force. It’s the dots the rest of y’all refuse to connect.
    Well - then you're just not realizing that if you just create a situation in which someone is harmed then you can be held at fault.
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  10. #180
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    Re: Father says son who took gun to school 'made a bad mistake'

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker View Post
    Yes - obviously the mother doesn't have a single braincell left in her head after all that meth she's done.

    I'd be surprised if it was a legal firearm at all.
    The so called mother could not have been in possession of a firearm legally as convicted felons are barred from possession.

    BTW, this is an isolated incident. What is missing from this discussion is the number of children alive because of a legal firearm. I remember a few incidences where a young person defended themselves with a firearm, and thousands more occur where a parent defended their children.

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