Page 11 of 26 FirstFirst ... 91011121321 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 110 of 260

Thread: US military cutbacks

  1. #101
    Sage
    apdst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bagdad, La.
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:46 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    76,219

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by ecofarm View Post
    1 enlistment 11H(a), now finishing phd. 3/505, 90-94
    You were in the Army way back when, if you were a hotel.
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

  2. #102
    global liberation

    ecofarm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami
    Last Seen
    Today @ 03:12 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    66,313

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by MarineTpartier View Post
    Good on you brother.
    Anyone at Bragg same time?

  3. #103
    Sage
    apdst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bagdad, La.
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:46 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    76,219

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by ecofarm View Post
    Anyone at Bragg same time?
    I never went to Ft. Bragg. Spent most of my time in a real unit.
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

  4. #104
    Cheese
    Aunt Spiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sasnakra
    Last Seen
    09-10-16 @ 06:10 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    28,433

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by Gonzo Rodeo View Post
    I was in the Air Scouts as an intel puke. Thank you for doing the real work.

    I'm going to break ranks for a minute and admit a dirty secret - not everyone keeps (or sometimes even had in the first place) their military bearing. Employers know this. Vets aren't necessarily a sure thing. I know you know a couple "dirt bags" from your time in. Every unit had them. Those guys usually get after after one enlistment, and end up back in the real world. They are still vets, in every sense of the word, and must be counted when talking about vets in general.

    Also, the PTSD thing is real concern for many employers. Not that a vet will necessarily go to work with a weapon or kill themselves or anything like that, but it can make someone "less than motivated." They need help, and employment is part of them regaining some sense of purpose.

    I took a job in a warehouse for a satellite dish installation sub-contractor who pretty much exclusively hired vets. The thing is, though, they didn't hire many of them full time. Some sneaky work around for maximizing tax breaks. We had more than our share of dirt bags... and I was one of them When I got out, I was clearing $60k a year after taxes, as a single E-5, with my flight and specialty and reenlistment bonus figured in. A $10/hr warehouse gig just didn't hold my attention, and I devolved into the worst type of human being I have ever been in my life. This is also a problem worth mentioning, that people in the service are paid like professionals and sometimes even treated like professionals. Now, I don't consider myself "above" certain types of work (although I would rather not work in food service ever again in my life), but vets do take a step down the ladder when they get out... unless they go back to work for the government as some type of contractor. Private industry really doesn't have an answer for that. I'm just lucky I found a gig with the county. I'm putting school on hold for the moment (I did my my Associate's degree right before I got out), and I'm going to do full-time work/new career with school on the side from now on.
    Absolutely.

    My husband has 3 years left - he earns a significant amount and once he's out (if they don't find a reason to let him go before his time is really up) he won't be able to find a job that comes close to his pay and utilizes his skills he's learned in his field.

    We're hoping - against hope - that he can hang on long enough for me to finish my college so we can shift duties carefully.
    A screaming comes across the sky.
    It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now.
    Pynchon - Gravity's Rainbow

  5. #105
    Sage

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL (USA)
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 10:11 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    9,762

    Re: US military cutbacks

    I understand people's concerns where cut backs in military spending are concerned, but we're been through these kind of adjustments before, i.e., right after WWII and Vietnam. Someone asked if a poster was reciting his commentary from a book. One such source would be "Your Government Failed You," by Richard A. Clarke. He explains in great detail many changes the Defense Dept. made immediately after Vietnam and again after 9/11. We're talking fundamental changes, such as some major universities ending their ROTC programs, how the Army began to recruite far more high school graduates rather than accept recruits with drug or other legal problems (Anyone remember how local judges gave convicts charged with misdemeaner offenses a choice between jail time or military services? That stopped for a time and didn't begin to pick back up again in earnest until after 9/11.), changes in the way our military trained, i.e., each branch once training separately but Vietnam forced the difference branches to start working together more, logicstics - how our military equipment moves or is staged around the world in theater, etc., etc. Even the National Guard which once limited its duties to domestic issues, i.e., crowd control or handling national disasters, became the reserve force to our active duty forces. I can't tell you how many of my former co-workers who were National Guardsmen/women got called to served in Iraq.

    Our military has gone through significant changes before either due to world changes or changes in attitude from the American people or for political reasons, but we've withstood such changes at every turn due most from clear, well thoughout out restructuring concepts orginating either from DoD itself, supported by the Joint Chiefs or as initiated by such great military minds such as retired Gen. Patreaus. We've succeeded in recent military campaigns such as Granada, Bosnia and the Gulf War, and in a post-9/11 world we've faired well in the War in Iraq, the War on Terror (in Afghanistan) and saw success using a smaller military footprint even in Lybia combining our Special Operations forces with our Naval forces to attain our military (and some would say a political) objective. And let's not forget how technology through innovative ideas from DARPA has also helped make our military leaner but still pack a devastating punch! Smart-bombs anyone?

    So, I wouldn't worry too much about the spending cuts in defense as this article from theHill.com attempts to elude to. We've adapted well before and I confident we'll adapt again and remain one of, if not, the most formidable military power on the planet!
    Last edited by Objective Voice; 01-07-12 at 06:52 PM.

  6. #106
    Sage
    apdst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bagdad, La.
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:46 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    76,219

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by Objective Voice View Post
    I understand people's concerns where cut backs in military spending are concerned, but we're been through these kind of adjustments before, i.e., right after WWII and Vietnam. Someone asked if a poster was reciting his commentary from a book. One such source would be "Your Government Failed You," by Richard A. Clarke. He explains in great detail many changes the Defense Dept. made immediately after Vietnam and again after 9/11. We're talking fundamental changes, such as some major universities ending their ROTC programs, how the Army began to recruite far more high school graduates rather than accept recruits with drug or other legal problems (Anyone remember how local judges gave convicts charged with misdemeaner offenses a choice between jail time or military services? That stopped for a time and didn't begin to pick back up again in earnest until after 9/11.), changes in the way our military trained, i.e., each branch once training separately but Vietnam forced the difference branches to start working together more, logicstics - how our military equipment moves or is staged around the world in theater, etc., etc. Even the National Guard which once limited its duties to domestic issues, i.e., crowd control or handling national disasters, became the reserve force to our active duty forces. I can't tell you how many of my former co-workers who were National Guardsmen/women got called to served in Iraq.

    Our military has gone through significant changes before either due to world changes or changes in attitude from the American people or for political reasons, but we've withstood such changes at every turn due most from clear, well thoughout out restructuring concepts orginating either from DoD itself, supported by the Joint Chiefs or as initiated by such great military minds such as retired Gen. Patreaus. We've succeeded in recent military campaigns such as Granada, Bosnia and the Gulf War, and in a post-9/11 world we've faired well in the War in Iraq, the War on Terror (in Afghanistan) and saw success using a smaller military footprint even in Lybia combining our Special Operations forces with our Naval forces to attain our military (and some would say a political) objective. And let's not forget how technology through innovative ideas from DARPA has also helped make our military leaner but still pack a devastating punch! Smart-bombs anyone?

    So, I wouldn't worry too much about the spending cuts in defense as this article from theHill.com attempts to elude to. We've adapted well before and I confident we'll adapt again and remain one of, if not, the most formidable military power on the planet!
    Spending cuts between the world wars, created a scenario where our soldiers had to train with wooden rifles. So, spending cuts have damaged our readiness at times, too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

  7. #107
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Last Seen
    12-29-15 @ 10:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    3,747

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by ecofarm View Post
    1 enlistment 11H(a), now finishing phd. 3/505, 90-94
    Hey, I was 11H once. Ever fire a 106mm Recoiless ?

  8. #108
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Last Seen
    12-29-15 @ 10:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    3,747

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by ecofarm View Post
    Anyone at Bragg same time?
    Left there in '80.

  9. #109
    better late than pregnant
    Gonzo Rodeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Here
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 07:35 PM
    Lean
    Private
    Posts
    4,130

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by MarineTpartier View Post
    Some employers will value the experience in the civilian sector, some will value the military experience. Just depends on the employer. It's up to them to find the ones that value the second one more. I'm not saying we should be disadvantaged. I am saying we should he on a level playing field. With that tax cut, the gov't is playing favorites. I also come from the school of thought that politicians, whether they have an (R) or (D) by their name, do whatever they can to make more and more people depend on the gov't so they can control them. Like I said in my earlier post, they already have minorities, gays, illegal immigrants, environmentalists, the jobless, pro-choicers, etc depending upon them because they make programs that give handouts or preferential treatment to all of them. If they can vets to suck on the nipple of big gov't as well, that is a very loud group that few people will stand against. Look what happened when they threatened to alter our retirement. Everybody was yelling about that. Imagine what would happen if someone tried to take that tax cut back. The more special programs given out, the more the party that started it has to throw in the face of the party trying to abolish it. I personally think that our retirement should begin at 55 instead of when you get out after 20 or 30. Why 55? Because I think we rate 7 years earlier than a civilian. Don't see many guys getting shot at in the civilian sector while paying on their 401k lol. I would make that concession without a complaint, as long as other people were doing it too. The Senate and House retirements programs come to mind.
    That is a very good point, and one I can respect. I too am tired of the constant suckle-from-the-teat temptation wagged in front of everybody nowadays. But it needs to be acknowledged that most vets are disadvantaged when it comes to reentering the civilian workforce. It has nothing to do with creed, color, national origin, religion, etc., but these people have given anywhere from two to twenty (or more) years of their life to serve the national good while simultaneously sitting out the career game back home. If you happen to not make twenty and retire, your livelyhood is directly disadvantaged compared with someone who has been doing the a given job longer than you. I could be an absolutely perfect, ideal employee in every conceivable way, but there's not necessarily limited to the military. Someone else who may be just as good as me, or even not as good, will have years ahead of me in line at whatever my next gig is. There is simply no getting around that. A twenty-four year old kid with a college degree and zero industry experience isn't much competition with a thirty-two year old vet with the same degree and industry experience, but that same kid with eight years under his belt will blow the vet out of the water every time. Employers want specific experience, and the vet's can't compete.

    And also, think about this - those Occupy protesters were largely made up of college kids who are pissed off about school and the lack of available employment for college graduates and the like.... would you rather see them replaced by a sea of combat veterans? Something to ponder.
    "Political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible. . . . Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness."
    ~Orwell, Politics and the English Language

  10. #110
    Sage
    apdst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bagdad, La.
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:46 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    76,219

    Re: US military cutbacks

    Quote Originally Posted by Eighty Deuce View Post
    Hey, I was 11H once. Ever fire a 106mm Recoiless ?
    OMG! That was a looooong time ago!
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    At least Bill saved his transgressions for grown women. Not suggesting what he did was OK. But he didn't chase 14 year olds.

Page 11 of 26 FirstFirst ... 91011121321 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •