Page 10 of 63 FirstFirst ... 891011122060 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 629

Thread: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

  1. #91
    Basketball Nerd
    StillBallin75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vilseck, Germany
    Last Seen
    12-10-17 @ 07:52 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Progressive
    Posts
    21,896

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverDad View Post
    Different stereotypes apply to women than to men.


    More black US men 'in jail than college'

    There are more black men in jail in the United States than there are in higher education, a new study has found.

    The report, by the Washington-based Justice Policy Institute, says the number of black men behind bars has grown by more than five times in the past 20 years.

    According to the study, there were 791,600 black men imprisoned in America in the year 2000, compared to 603,032 enrolled in college or university.
    your information is dated.

    More black men in jail or college? An old “fact” revisited – Martin's Gumbo Ya-Ya

  2. #92
    User Crown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Seen
    11-21-11 @ 10:43 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    2

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathematician View Post
    Well, IMO, if the school is having the more influential role then the parent isn't doing their job in some sense. The teachers can teach and try to motivate these students, but parents are the only ones allowed to discipline them for lack of effort. I'll teach people fairly, but if a student chooses to slack then I'm not going to slow down for them because it hurts those students who are paying attention and can excel.

    If the parents are poor then you'd think they'd emphasize hard study to their kids to get them out of lower-class. My mother had me less than two months after HS graduation and was kicked out of the house by my grandfather. I promise you that getting where I am wasn't luck. I had made my career plans by 14 and stuck to them. Instead of playing Nintendo, I put in extra study time to get ahead.

    I want to see the much of what you stated, and it starts with the parents.
    Yes, ideally the parents should be the ultimate motivators and disciplinarians of their children. And poor parents do have a greater incentive to take this role seriously, stressing the value of education to their children and being active in their academic lives, so that they can also have a better life when their child becomes a successful and wealthy doctor/engineer etc. This attitude is prevalent among many immigrant families I know, and it is admirable -- they enter the U.S poor and become comfortably upper-middle class in 20-30 years simply by drilling the value of education into their children and refusing to accept less than excellent grades on their report cards.
    But this culture, of utmost appreciation for education, doesn't exist among African American families. Most black children are now raised by single mothers who are often too busy trying to make ends meet for themselves and their children to pay attention to how their children are getting along in school. Even in two parent households, it is often the case that one parent has to work two jobs to meet the needs of the family and has no time to monitor their children. For this reason, so many black children don't get the support they need at home in order to succeed in school and are more likely to be influenced by negative peer pressure. This is where schools should step in. Instead of condemning black parents for being absent from their children's educational development, we would better off looking at where schools can fill that void. One program, KIPP, has made strides in this regard. With longer school days and significant teacher involvement in student's lives, they've increased test scores and college attendance rates in some low-income communities. Expanding this sort of service to more at-risk students would present some major challenges, especially in the current public education environment. But we can at least learn a thing or two from programs like KIPP and work through those some of those challenges, thus creating a more positive, productive culture among future black adults instead of vilifying their parents for their shortcomings.

  3. #93
    Sage
    RiverDad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Seen
    04-20-14 @ 02:16 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    5,039

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by ric27 View Post
    I'd like see kids graduate from high school knowing how to read and write at the college level, speak multiple languages in addition to English, understand math up through algebra, and be able to manage their own personal finances. I'd like them to understand civics and history to the point where they become critical thinking, active members of our political system. I'd like them to be able to successfully participate in some sort of extra curricular activity that enriches their childhood experience and teaches them character and maturity. In short, I'd be really happy if an American kid could graduate high school and be prepared to either continue on to college or successfully enter the job market. And I'd like to see a culture within the school system that promotes these behaviors and outcomes. Conversely, I'd also like that culture to be intolerant of behaviors that are detrimental to these goals. A culture were it doesn't seem like a reasonable choice to act like a thug, get your girlfriend pregnant, etc, etc...
    It won't happen. Everyone is not like you. Half the nation has an IQ below 98. Many quite far below 98. You're setting your expectations based on your life and what you see in the social circles you travel through. Most people's social circles are bounded by IQ, that is they don't interact much with people 2o point above and 20 points below their own IQ.

  4. #94
    Basketball Nerd
    StillBallin75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vilseck, Germany
    Last Seen
    12-10-17 @ 07:52 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Progressive
    Posts
    21,896

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by ric27 View Post
    Can't let this slide.....

    You have a kid that shows up to school wearing a Mohawk haircut that's been dyed green. No big deal right? Kids will be kids and all of that. Except for the fact that by allowing that sort of behavior at school, you've told him and everyone else that it's "normal" and by normalizing that admittedly harmless behavior now it seems reasonable to show up at say, ...a job interview with the same look. So by allowing a counter culture haircut, in effect you've maybe set that kid up for failure later in life.
    All of this may be true. Nothing here, however, contradicts what i've stated in my post - which is that social norms and social expectations too often focus on the surface, rather than on the substance. I'm not encouraging an employer to hire someone regardless of how he or she dresses (although ideally i believe how someone looks should be irrelevant to their job performance). I was merely making an observation.

  5. #95
    Sage
    RiverDad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Seen
    04-20-14 @ 02:16 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    5,039

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by StillBallin75 View Post
    your information is dated.]
    A one year blip. That's fine. Notice how close the numbers are. Whether it's "more" or "less" is not as important as the fact that the two categories are fluctuating around parity. It's the parity balance that speaks volumes. Things are not suddenly brighter if the year to year numbers slip and suddenly there are 1,234 more black men in college than in prison at any given moment.

    What happens when you look at the numbers of college graduates versus ex-cons in the total black male population? This takes the analysis away from a momentary snapshot in time and looks at life histories.

    The stereotype is not inaccurate.

  6. #96
    Sage

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:58 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    89,819

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by ric27 View Post
    Pity you can't answer the question though. Instead, you attack the questioner and portray yourself as the martyr. Looks like political lockstep with the left to me.


    the real pity is that just because you prostrate yourself before the same altar as River - you dare not tell him that his comments are just so much double talk and malarkey.
    __________________________________________________ _
    There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.... John Rogers

  7. #97
    Professor
    Mathematician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Last Seen
    09-22-17 @ 09:35 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    2,147

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Crown View Post
    Yes, ideally the parents should be the ultimate motivators and disciplinarians of their children. And poor parents do have a greater incentive to take this role seriously, stressing the value of education to their children and being active in their academic lives, so that they can also have a better life when their child becomes a successful and wealthy doctor/engineer etc. This attitude is prevalent among many immigrant families I know, and it is admirable -- they enter the U.S poor and become comfortably upper-middle class in 20-30 years simply by drilling the value of education into their children and refusing to accept less than excellent grades on their report cards.
    But this culture, of utmost appreciation for education, doesn't exist among African American families. Most black children are now raised by single mothers who are often too busy trying to make ends meet for themselves and their children to pay attention to how their children are getting along in school. Even in two parent households, it is often the case that one parent has to work two jobs to meet the needs of the family and has no time to monitor their children. For this reason, so many black children don't get the support they need at home in order to succeed in school and are more likely to be influenced by negative peer pressure. This is where schools should step in. Instead of condemning black parents for being absent from their children's educational development, we would better off looking at where schools can fill that void. One program, KIPP, has made strides in this regard. With longer school days and significant teacher involvement in student's lives, they've increased test scores and college attendance rates in some low-income communities. Expanding this sort of service to more at-risk students would present some major challenges, especially in the current public education environment. But we can at least learn a thing or two from programs like KIPP and work through those some of those challenges, thus creating a more positive, productive culture among future black adults instead of vilifying their parents for their shortcomings.
    I don't buy that the parents see their kids so little that they can't emphasize education.
    "With me everything turns into mathematics."
    "It is not enough to have a good mind. The main thing is to use it well."
    "It is truth very certain that, when it is not in one's power to determine what is true, we ought to follow what is more probable." -- Rene Descartes

  8. #98
    Sage
    RiverDad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Seen
    04-20-14 @ 02:16 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    5,039

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Invisible View Post
    EDIT: Also when one looks at education, we must look at the a phenomenon which has been called "The Dumbing Down of America" (Commentary: The dumbing down of America | McClatchy) (The Dumbing-Down of America - HUMAN EVENTS) (The Dumbing Down of America | Common Dreams) which efffects all people as it leaves kids memorizing facts and regurgitating them on paper and the kids then think that they are smart. The game has been changed from one of actual knowledge to one of memorization. If you can memorize the most information and regurgitate it the correct way, then you are considered "smart." However, many of these kids that can do that cannot think independently or critically.
    I think that your comment is quite interesting. It would be good if we could develop the skills that you mention but the problem is that schools don't know how to teach independent thinking and critical thinking. Secondly, when we analyze how critical thinking actually operates we find that much of it is based on analytic reasoning where "fact" are compared and differences spotted. For this to occur one needs a solid base of knowledge, you know, those memorized facts. Here's an example - memorize your times tables. Once you've got them committed to memory then you are equipped to detect patterns and tricks which allow you to extend your knowledge beyond what you've memorized. If you know your #10 times table then you'll have no problem with the #100 times table and the #1,000 times table. If you don't know your #10 times table, then you're going to stumble around trying to do multiplication calculations based on 100 and 1,000.

  9. #99
    Sage
    ric27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Last Seen
    06-15-17 @ 02:57 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    7,539

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by haymarket View Post
    the real pity is that just because you prostrate yourself before the same altar as River - you dare not tell him that his comments are just so much double talk and malarkey.
    Hmmmm....Our public education system aka "government schools" is nothing more than a shifty pyramid scheme bent on Marxist socialization.

    The only tangible things that are accomplished in K-12 today is teaching kids how to vote for democrats and fornicate with one another. I guess in some places they still teach kids how to play sports, but to my mind that's not remotely enough to redeem the evils of the system.

    Double talk and malarkey??

  10. #100
    Professor

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Dakota
    Last Seen
    09-02-17 @ 08:22 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    2,357

    Re: Black unemployment: Highest in 27 years

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverDad View Post
    It's funny that you mention stereotypes, in that stereotypes are the victim of stereotyping, as you've described stereotyping. Do you follow? You claim that stereotype are inaccurate most of the time and people believe the stereotypes. Well, research shows that most stereotypes are true and yet believe believe the opposite of them. From the American Psychological Association comes this research-based textbook:
    Stereotype Accuracy: Toward Appreciating Group Differences

    Social psychology has been dominated over the past 20 years with a focus on error and bias in social perception. By psychologists and lay people alike, stereotypes are assumed to be bad and inaccurate. The idea that stereotypes may have some degree of accuracy has been seen as anathema, and those raising the question of stereotype accuracy have been viewed as racist, sexist, or worse.

    Stereotype Accuracy breaks this taboo by presenting research related to stereotype accuracy, arguing that understanding stereotype accuracy is crucial to both social psychology and to its applications (e.g., to improving intergroup relations). The goals of this volume are to reduce commonplace errors in modern social science by challenging the off-hand and undocumented claims appearing in the scholarly literature that stereotypes are "typically" inaccurate, resistant to change, overgeneralized, exaggerated, and generally destructive.
    Yes, I follow what you are saying. However, whether a stereotype is accurate or not does not really affect my argument. There are more negative stereotypes put forth about blacks and some other minorities in America than whites, and I think that contributes to blacks having a lower amount of success in the Labor markets. Personally, I think that using stereotypes accuracy as a way to defend the status quo would be incorrect. While you could say that SOME stereotypes are accurate on the average, and some are more accurate than others, you also have to take into account that with these broad generalities there is a high degree of variability. Lets say for arguements sake, and this is pure speculation, that the reason for the stereotype of most blacks being lazy is really because most of them really are lazy, and this means that they SHOULD have more people unemployed, this is unacceptable to me because this stereotype while accurate of the group would lack any sort of precision if you applied it to an individual. One black person could be living as a bum on the street on food stamps while one could be president of the country. Its really a case of accuracy vs. precision.

Page 10 of 63 FirstFirst ... 891011122060 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •