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Thread: Democrats Turn to Online Sales Tax for New Revenues Following Debt Battle

  1. #11
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    Re: Democrats Turn to Online Sales Tax for New Revenues Following Debt Battle

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Perry View Post
    Then the solution is obvious. Make it tax free for both.
    Sure, no problem. Then you can run your own police department, fire department, road construction crews, schools, hospitals, etc., etc.

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    Re: Democrats Turn to Online Sales Tax for New Revenues Following Debt Battle

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamT View Post
    Indeed. The "little guy" in this story is the in-state brick and mortar store that's at a competitive disadvantage because it has to charge sales tax on the exact item that an online retailer can sell tax free.
    The box seller however doesn't pay shipping charges or bundles the shipping charges into the cost of the item. Any advantage an online seller has by not charging taxes is quickly erased by having to pay shipping to get the item to the buyer.
    I think if Thomas Jefferson were looking down, the author of the Bill of Rights, on whats being proposed here, hed agree with it. He would agree that the First Amendment cannot be absolute. - Chuck Schumer (D). Yet, Madison and Mason wrote the Bill of Rights, according to Sheila Jackson Lee, 400 years ago. Yup, it's a fact.


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    Re: Democrats Turn to Online Sales Tax for New Revenues Following Debt Battle

    Quote Originally Posted by Ockham View Post
    The box seller however doesn't pay shipping charges or bundles the shipping charges into the cost of the item. Any advantage an online seller has by not charging taxes is quickly erased by having to pay shipping to get the item to the buyer.
    No, not really. The online retailer saves a ton of money by not having to maintain an expensive retail establishment, sales staff, and all the rest of it. They can locate themselves in the cheapest possible place and save all that money. In any case, shipping costs are the price of convenience. I don't buy stuff online to avoid sales tax; I buy stuff online because I can do it from my keyboard.

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    Re: Democrats Turn to Online Sales Tax for New Revenues Following Debt Battle

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamT View Post
    No, not really. The online retailer saves a ton of money by not having to maintain an expensive retail establishment, sales staff, and all the rest of it. They can locate themselves in the cheapest possible place and save all that money. In any case, shipping costs are the price of convenience. I don't buy stuff online to avoid sales tax; I buy stuff online because I can do it from my keyboard.
    How inexpensive -- that's subjective. No sales staff but certainly a web staff to make sure their point of sale (the Website) is open and working and updated. They also have to have staff for packing and shipping for if they did not, they'd have to pay a company to pack and ship for them increasing the costs. Granted the overhead of brick and mortar is higher and must include losses for in store breakage (depending on the type of store) but chains can buy in bulk and get discounts smaller online stores cannot. It's probably closer in costs at the end of the day - the area where it may be wider is in the profit margins.
    I think if Thomas Jefferson were looking down, the author of the Bill of Rights, on whats being proposed here, hed agree with it. He would agree that the First Amendment cannot be absolute. - Chuck Schumer (D). Yet, Madison and Mason wrote the Bill of Rights, according to Sheila Jackson Lee, 400 years ago. Yup, it's a fact.


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