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Thread: He cannot be serious?

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    User paraclete's Avatar
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    He cannot be serious?

    Personally lobbying the head of a nation to approve a resources project by blocking judicial revue. Why should a national of another country have personal access to the PM to lobby him?

    Gautum Adani makes special request to Malcolm Turnbull over $15b deal
    Date December 9, 2015 - 9:47AM 1515 reading now (29) Read later


    Malcolm Turnbull's 'exciting times' mash-up

    The Resources Minister tells ABC Insiders there is a 'moral imperative' to push ahead with the Adani coal mine. Courtesy ABC News 24.

    Billionaire businessman Gautum Adani has personally asked Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to frame a special law that prohibits activist groups from seeking judicial review of environmental approvals for major projects such as Adani's proposed $15 billion coal mine, rail and port project in Queensland.

    Mr Adani said the proposal was placed before the Australian government during an hour-long meeting with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on 4 December.


    "Now it is enough. They cannot continue to challenge the project. They cannot go for judicial review all the time. In OECD countries, you are not given approvals with closed eyes," he said.


    Advertisement In 2010, the Adani Group acquired the rights to develop the Carmichael coal mine in Galilee Basin of Queensland and a rail link with Abbot Point Port to ship the coal, but the project has been opposed by green groups.

    "They are finding some technicality to seek review; that anyone can do. Some technical mistake here and there and they go to court. That will not help the larger interest," Adani said in an interview in Thiruvananthapuram on 5 December.


    Adani said the project was "very important" from the point of view of both India and Australia.

    "It's the world's largest coal reserve which will support a minimum 100 million people to have electricity and light and for 100 years," he said.

    "Ultimately, a decision lies with the politicians. They have to go Parliament for enacting a special law which says that once government gives approval, no one can challenge it. That is what our request is to the Australian government. You come up with a special legislation which they have done in the past also.

    "The challenge we are facing in Australia right now is on the one side government is giving all approvals and on the other side, environment activists groups are seeking judicial review and that derails the whole project."

    Fairfax Media put questions to Mr Turnbull's office on Tuesday about his meeting with Mr Adani.

    The Prime Minister's office refused to comment on what was discussed at the meeting or give a response to Mr Adani's proposal, which is similar to the so-called "lawfare" amendments proposed under former prime minister Tony Abbott.

    A spokesman for Mr Turnbull confirmed the pair had met last week.

    A spokeswoman for Environment Minister Greg Hunt said the government still planned to pursue amendments to Australia's environment laws that would restrict the ability for green and community groups to object to major developments.

    "Australia has very strong environmental laws which apply to everyone, and the government will not diminish any environmental protections or the penalties for breaking them," she said.

    "The government has sought to ensure that American style serial litigation is not adopted in Australia, and that once the stringent environmental requirements are met, projects should not be subject to continuing stalling litigation.

    "The proposed legislative amendments, which are not project specific, are currently before the Senate and won't be considered until the Parliament resumes next year."

    Cross benchers, Labor and the Greens have previously indicated they would block the amendments.

    The project has been the subject of sustained debate with the Queensland Treasury describing the project as unbankable.

    In August, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia role as a financial adviser ended. Several banks have also ruled out lending to the project.

    Mr Adani said ongoing court cases were hurting Adani's ability to raise money.

    "Even though there is no stay, because of the judicial review, no lender will finance the project. They do not know what will be the outcome," he said.

    The controversy has delayed the project by one and half years over which time the price of coal has slumped drastically and other mines on the east coast are being closed or facing production cuts.

    "In the meanwhile, coal prices have also slumped. We have to revive to the next cycle," he said.​

    with Bloomberg

    Read more: Gautum Adani makes special request to Malcolm Turnbull over $15b deal

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    Re: He cannot be serious?

    As a followup it is unlikey this project will go ahead for environmental reasons

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